Will you work during a Pandemic? - page 31

admin note: we just added a poll to this thread today, april 25, 2008, please take a second and vote in the poll so we can have a graphical representation of the responses. thanks scenario: ... Read More

  1. by   typoagain
    How about this: Terrorist attack the US and the government is in total disarray. Military unit are unable to get enough food, ammo and fuel. Would you expect the military to show up and protect your hometown from attack?

    One is the same as the other in my book. We are nurses, and WE ARE the health care system. Good or bad, dangerous or even deadly, it is the job we signed on for.

    I would try to be the first one there. And there I would stay until it is over.

    By the way-first responders and health care workers will be the first people to get any immunizations that come along. If I am passing out these meds, you can bet my family will be covered too. They will also be at the hospital working with me. You can stay at home and hide in your hole-and wait in line for your meds with everybody else.
    Last edit by typoagain on Apr 29, '09 : Reason: Over looked one point-
  2. by   DeepFriedRN
    i suppose that if i had an ample stock of ppe, and a total assurance that i AND my family will get both anti-virals and a vaccine (when available) then i might go. But there is no way in heck I'd work without those things. I have asthma, so flu and stuff settles in my lungs. I can't help anyone if I'm sick. So I have to take care of myself first. Which means I need PPE, and anti-virals if I get it, and prophylactic anti-virals for my fam so I don't spend all my time worrying about them and can do my job.(though I get vaccinated every year, so if possible would rather go that route and avoid sickness)I'd need proof in hand before I would. Although that said, I'm in SoCal, and I'm going to work tomorrow, so who's to say I'm not walking in to the lion's den at 7 am tomorrow morning? Hopefully not. Nobody can really say for sure either way. My guess would be that there are a lot more cases than anyone fully appreciates..Wash, wash, wash..
  3. by   lamazeteacher
    Deep Fried RN, be sure to have your properly fitted N95 mask with you at all times, and use it when a coughing person approaches you (although that person should be wearing the mask); and avoid crowds.

    Yes, I'd find a place to work, as I'm retired now.
    Last edit by lamazeteacher on Apr 29, '09 : Reason: addition
  4. by   MAISY, RN-ER
    Someone mentioned a ventilator....I will assume that flu or any pandemic emergency would be similar to the disaster plans we have for mass casualty burns. Anyone 55 yo or older automatically placed on comfort care, then it goes by severity and beds. Forget anyone needing maitenance care, dialysis or anything else. They will die....plain and simple.

    It isn't going to be about caring for anyone, I truly believe it will be mass chaos with those who "know somebody" getting VIP care first and the hell with everyone else!

    After Katrina, I have no doubt that we will be let down in more ways than one as citizens of this country. That was just a hurricane affecting one area of the country, not a pandemic event. Seeing the response to Swine Flu, I have no doubt the populace would go wild in a true deadly epidemic.

    M
  5. by   cardiacRN2006
    Quote from rockenmomRN
    just noticed that the majority of people who voted on the pole said they would go to work, yet in going through all these posting; there are only a handful that say they would go. in fact the overwhelming majority is that they wouldn't go to work.

    Without even a second guess-I'd work. That is our job. I can't imagine saying, "I'll work on regular days, but when I'm needed the most I'll stay home"

    That is perplexing to me.

    But to each his own.
  6. by   indigo girl
    Quote from DeepFriedRN
    i suppose that if i had an ample stock of ppe, and a total assurance that i AND my family will get both anti-virals and a vaccine (when available) then i might go. But there is no way in heck I'd work without those things. I have asthma, so flu and stuff settles in my lungs. I can't help anyone if I'm sick. So I have to take care of myself first. Which means I need PPE, and anti-virals if I get it, and prophylactic anti-virals for my fam so I don't spend all my time worrying about them and can do my job.(though I get vaccinated every year, so if possible would rather go that route and avoid sickness)I'd need proof in hand before I would. Although that said, I'm in SoCal, and I'm going to work tomorrow, so who's to say I'm not walking in to the lion's den at 7 am tomorrow morning? Hopefully not. Nobody can really say for sure either way. My guess would be that there are a lot more cases than anyone fully appreciates..Wash, wash, wash..
    Good post, DeepFriedRN.

    Was the US DHS Release of 12 Million Treatment Doses from the National Strategic Stockpile Appropriate?

    http://www.flutrackers.com/forum/sho...69&postcount=1

    These words were just posted yesterday by a physician. He's an interesting man, best known for his commonsense approach to teaching lay people how to care for their sick loved ones at home during an influenza outbreak. Just basic info for HCW perhaps, but taking care of the sick for some people could be challenging.

    ftp://wikimember:wiki123@singtomeohm...nza%2016pt.pdf

    Is he right about the release of the stockpile being inappropriate? Maybe.

    He says that it was supposed to be for reserved for critical workers who are needed to serve the community, people like us. I don't know if he is correct in supposition, but if he is, then this is food for thought.

    Originally Posted by www.flutrackers.com

    Quote from www.flutrackers.com

    It was not a strategic deployment. It was a politically motivated tactical deployment and an entirely inappropriate use of a strategic resource in my view.

    The National Strategic Stockpile of materials is just that; strategic. What Sec. Napolitano did was deploy a strategic resource for a politically tactical reason. This is very worrisome because it shows that she does not have a grasp of just how severe the current situation is.

    Why? Simply put strategic resources must be maintained in reserve for use in as a last resort. They are resources that a country reserves for use when its very existence is threatened. The anti-viral drugs maintained in the National Strategic Stockpile have already been designated for use by the CDC's updated rationing plan, one I support. The diversion of a quarter of this precious resource for non-targeted civilian use for treatment of those with influenza within the states most affected by the virus is a violation of the policy adopted by the CDC .

    This is an important issue because the doses released by DHS from the strategic stockpile have been earmarked for use by fireman, policeman, EMS, the political leadership, nurses, doctors, pharmacists and many others responsible for maintaining our critical infrastructure including electric power, clean water and food on the table. While the drugs diverted by the Secretary for general use will save lives and all lives have great value, her choice to do so was not a humane one in the long run.
    I don't know if he is correct in saying that is what this was reserved for, or if that is not the current intended use, but if he is then this is food for thought.
  7. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from multicollinearity
    yesterday in clinical one of my classmates said that if a big pandemic hits, nurses without children should work 7 days a week to staff the hospitals, and nurses with children should be excused from working. she said this looking at me, knowing i don't have children. i had to control myself to not say something vulgar.
    unfortunately, that's a common attitude. i've also heard that nurses without children should work all the nights, weekends and holidays, too, so that the parents can be home with their children. to which i say "you chose to have children; you chose to work in a hospital. step up and deal."
  8. by   dotherightthing
    Yes, I would.

    First, I'm not independently wealthy and would have to work.
    Second, I've learned to take care of myself. Though not invincible, I would rather work with what I know rather than what I don't. I worked primarily with patients with active pulmonary TB for a year and my TB skin test didn't convert.
    Third, at the moment, I'm working as a school nurse. I feel super-exposed to everything in that setting. There's little equipment, no proper access to handwashing and you're looked at strangely if you decide to use what's there.

    If I were working with people with the Swine Flu, like in the early days of HIV/AIDS, you know what you know. It's what you don't know that trips you up.

    Just my opinion and I welcome yours.
  9. by   HippyGreenPeaceChick
    I do not have a respirator, nor do I particularly feel like giving into the overbaked drama and carrying one with me. I am young, fit, very healthy. I eat well, rest well, take my vitamins, and drink lots of water. Am I invulnerable---NO. However I trust my health enough to take care of myself.
  10. by   robrtp
    seems kind of cowardly to me to not.

    nurses will be on the front line of STOPPING the pandemic. if 30 percent of the work force just stayed home, that will be crippling to the healthcare system. what modern hospital these days does not stock plenty of PPEs to deal with a crisis like this and protect it's workers. who will stop the pandemic if the nurses won't?
    isn't it honorable to rise to the spirit of the challenge and do that which you are trained to do.

    maybe that's too cavalier, but come on. if you don't care about the people you work for and on enough to respond to them in their greatest hour of need, then maybe you are in the wrong industry.

    just some controversial thoughts.
  11. by   ktwlpn
    We had a nasty norovirus this winter and staff and residents alike were pooping their guts out.We were really unable to enforce the quarantine-every time some stoopid visitor/significant other called the admin with a complaint they were allowed to come in.And staff continued to be pulled from unit to unit depending upon need. It just went on and on .If we get this flu it's going to be oogly..We have plenty of food-I am going to get some extra pet food tomorrow.
    Years ago during a bout with flu I took an anti viral.I was still as sick as a dog and had vertigo with the med on board.I went back to work a day or so sooner then I normally would have-got there,got dizzy and passed out while transferring a fresh amputee....Won't do that again...
  12. by   cardiac mama
    I agree with you 100%, as nurses it is our job to help especially in times of need and emergency situations. It's what we do everyday, however, we really do have to have some PPE who knows maybe we will invent some new ones, and just protect ourselves as we try to protect those around us.
  13. by   rockenmomRN
    Quote from goju
    admin note: we just added a poll to this thread today, april 25, 2008, please take a second and vote in the poll so we can have a graphical representation of the responses. thanks

    scenario:

    h5n1 (the bird flu) mutates to become efficient at transmitting human to human causing a pandemic, with a case fatality rate of 60% and with 80% of the cases in the 0-40 year old age range.

    see:
    http://www.wpro.who.int/nr/rdonlyres.../0/s4_1113.jpg

    hospitals will be quickly overrun. hospital staff shortages are 50%. the government orders all nurses to work. there is not enough personal protection equipment (n95 masks, gloves, goggles, tamiflu, vax, etc)

    home quarantines become common (in the fed plans).
    your family is also quarantined in your home. you are running out of food and the government promises you will be "taken care of" if you report to work.

    will you go?

    do you guys really believe that it is our responsibility? and let me clarify, if i see an accient on the road, i'm the first to pull over. if there's a really hard assignment i'm the 1st to jump in. but the scenario presented was would we go to work if there wasn't adequate ppe. i don't think its our responsibility to go work in a dangerous environment and potentially bring home something to our families/loved ones.

    i believe that if you decide to go to work in a pandemic situation, great. but to say its our responsibility or duty is going a little too far.

    i agree with what a previous poster said, i went into nursing to care for people (in addition to job security, schedule, and money) not to die for them. just my 2cents.

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