Will you work during a Pandemic? - page 19

admin note: we just added a poll to this thread today, april 25, 2008, please take a second and vote in the poll so we can have a graphical representation of the responses. thanks scenario: ... Read More

  1. by   K98
    Quote from nanacarol
    Or maybe the rest of you should become true caregivers, servants. Remember, putting others first. Of course I would desire to save my family, but maybe by doing for someone else I would be doing just that. And I do have a life, it is just not centered around me and mine. nanacarol
    RN = Registered Nurse, not Registered Servant. I, like all of the nurses on here, am a caregiver. What exactly is a "true caregiver?" Please, enlighten me.
  2. by   grace90
    hey moderators, this is getting hostile, myself included, so what's the plan? are ya locking this thread?

    nobody is going to change anyone else's mind

    perhaps there is no right or wrong answer regarding loyalty to family vs loyalty to profession

    it's an issue each individual must make for themselves
  3. by   bigjim
    Quote from correctlywrong
    I'd go to work and stay there for the duration. I would expect that my family recieve sufficient supplies to weather the storm in quarantine, but I would take my chances doing my duty. I knew it was a possibility when I entered the profession and I wouldn't have started down this path if I hadn't already determined what I intend to do when push comes to shove.

    Someone has to provide care. Even at the risk of their own well being. The sick people are someone's family, and just as I would want a caregiver to come to work to take care of me and mine, I would want to be there to do my part. Especially with so many of you opting to stay home.


    While I disagree with your opinion, I appreciate the logical, reasoned, and non-hostile way that you expressed yourself. Others could learn from your good example.
    One thing though, in all seriousness, making sure your family gets the supplies they need means YOU need to buy and store them BEFORE the trouble starts.
    Count on the government to make nothing better, and possibly make a lot of things much worse, sometimes by accident and sometimes on purpose.
    Last edit by bigjim on May 2, '08
  4. by   nanacarol
    For those of you who are "just RNs" a true caregiver is one who walks in the areas of need as Florence Nightingale and Ms Wald and the other matriachs of the profession did before the 21st century and the arrival of "what's in it ofr me" group decided to become nurses. Please I am not trying to put anyone down or do emotional blackmail, I am merely pointing out that nursing and being a nurse places each of us in the very tenious position of doing for others before ourselves and ours.
  5. by   Laidback Al
    As I have posted elsewhere in this forum, I am not a nurse or a HCW, so I don't want to speak out of turn here. But for all of you that think there is a sacred duty for nurses to help and care for people, then act now, do not wait to be a martyr once a pandemic starts. Help educate your colleagues and coworkers about the dangers and economic ramifications of a pandemic. Lobby your administrators and supervisors to stockpile PPE, have your local health care community develop triage plans for when a third of all HCWs call in sick or don't show up for work.

    There will sadness and suffering, but failing to act now to help change the situation will only add to that sadness and suffering.
  6. by   bigjim
    Quote from nanacarol
    For those of you who are "just RNs" a true caregiver is one who walks in the areas of need as Florence Nightingale and Ms Wald and the other matriachs of the profession did before the 21st century and the arrival of "what's in it ofr me" group decided to become nurses. Please I am not trying to put anyone down or do emotional blackmail, I am merely pointing out that nursing and being a nurse places each of us in the very tenious position of doing for others before ourselves and ours.
    That is your opinion, which applies only to you. I actually respect your single-minded dedication, but your smug self-satisfaction is ridiculous.
  7. by   Jacksdad
    I honestly appalaud the people that would go in during a pandemic, but I think the question will be moot if this thing mutates to a human form with a high CFR. At present less than 3 out of 10 patients are surviving H5N1, even with Tamiflu and respirators. I believe that within a few weeks of a major pandemic (akin to, or worse than the Spanish Flu) hitting our shores, the healthcare system would be completely overwhelmed. Just as in 1918, and more recently with SARS, we're seeing most of the victims currently succumbing to high path avian flu dying as a result of cytokine storms leading to respiratory failure. First hand accounts by nurses and doctors during the Spanish flu outbreak talk of soldiers lined up in beds struggling to breathe before dying in their hundreds in makeshift hospitals in army camps around the US. If we see something on that scale again, how many desperately sick people turning up at a given facility could realistically be provided with respiratory support? Ten? Twenty? What if it was a hundred, or 500?
    http://www.fluwikie.com/ has some excellent info for those who would like to get up to speed on H5N1 (they have a couple of excellent downloadable articles in their preparedness guides section by Grattan Woodson MD, and Dr. Dave that make very sobering reading).
    If you take this threat seriously enough that you're debating whether to go to work to look after other people's family members during a pandemic, I think it makes complete sense to make sure that your family has a supply of the things they would need that might be in short supply like food, water, meds, toiletries, etc. Ask yourself this - if it happened today, how much food do you have in the house, and how long could you feed yourself? And if the power went out for a while, could you provide heat and light, or cook the food you've stored? With this virus continuing to spread around the world unabated, and mutating as it does, I think it's wise to adopt the philosophy that we should hope for the best, but prepare for the worst.
  8. by   blue_yuina
    my dream is to go to a place where an epidemic is... weird? my friends say so, but I really feel that way... maybe because I am not married yet... and I don't have children to take care of... it's really hard to say my final words right now, so I choose YES...






    Student-Nurse at your service
  9. by   RNperdiem
    A likely scenario is that my family would all get the flu-probably brought home from school. Illness does not last forever. If I survive, I'm likely immune, and once recovered enough, I would probably go to work.
  10. by   indigo girl
    Quote from RNperdiem

    Illness does not last forever. If I survive, I'm likely immune, and once recovered enough,I would probably go to work.
    True, if you survive, you might be immune, but there were people in the
    1918 epidemic (another bird flu), who were infected more than once.

    Also, we are seeing that survivors of H5N1 tend to be hospitalized for quite
    some time unless they were lucky enough to be infected by a mild strain
    like some of the little kids in southern Egypt. That would be unlikely though
    because if we are seeing many deaths, it probably is not a mild strain.
    Many of the recovered patients of 1918 also had severe sequelae that might
    hinder the ability to return to the type of heavy nursing care that we are
    talking about here. We are not machines. If you return to work too soon you
    could relapse as we already know from our experience with other illnesses
    including seasonal flu.
  11. by   FluMom
    Some nurses on other Fourms have stated that they have been and will be kept basically hostage at their posts.

    Let's face it the Hospitals will not stock up on N95 masks or other protection so I have an idea.

    People who volunteer to work during the pandemic would sign a contract to work during a pandemic and for that the Hospital will purchase a term insurance policy which will be paid to the family if the signer dies from the pandemic virus. If the signer dies from other causes the insurance money goes into a fund that pays for the insurance for this program.

    You would sign a contract every year and could back out at signing date each year. Some may back out and insurance is terminated but for those who renew the insurance remains. Term insurance is cheap.

    How you get the Hospitals to care about their employess and prepare for a pandemic I do not have a clue. You and your families must and should be protected. But you should not only get bigger pay during the pandemic but you should have life insurance to help your family should you die.

    Just an idea. Hope some of you can take this to the right person at you place of employment and propose it.
  12. by   SoundofMusic
    No, I would not. I just couldn't even be helpful knowing my own young children were home alone without me. I wouldl be useless in such a situation, so it's best to go home. My kids are younger and will need me in such a situation. If I have to die, I'd rather be with them to go than separated from them. Sad, but I've thought about these things before.
  13. by   Perpetual Student
    Some nurses on other Fourms have stated that they have been and will be kept basically hostage at their posts.
    Please elaborate. Do you mean physically held hostage, or held by a need to bring home pay?

close