Nurse: 'I was fired for refusing flu shot' - page 18

by DesertRN2 62,711 Views | 266 Comments

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    Quote from CrunchRN
    I know, it is awful how greed is causing so many to mislead about the "shortage" and most nursing schools are still misleading people.
    If greed would cause people to mislead others about a nursing shortage, it just might be greed would cause people to love vaccine sales too. Just sayin'.
  2. 0
    I guess it is hard for me to be un-biased since I have had the vaccine the last 24 of 25 years and I don't find compelling evidence for harm in the validated data I have seen.

    But hey, I am not going to convince you and will not try. Not beating a dead horse is another of my life tenets these days.
  3. 0
    Probably a good plan. My husband had a severe reaction to a flu shot a few years ago that they said they were "sure" wasn't caused by the vaccine. No tests were done, they were just "sure" of it. Well, he never had a reaction like that at any other time in his life and just happened to have it right after getting the vaccine. These things can't be proven which makes the science of this so hard to get a hold of. Many adverse reactions are simply not investigated or reported. I guess you either believe it or you don't. (Which means I won't try and convince you either.) I just want the freedom to choose or not based on my own beliefs.
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    Found at Nurses Who Vaccinate | Facebook

    Orange Nose Day
    is an annual event where health educators like you get to share your messages along with a dose of surprise. When we wear a virtual or real orange foam clown nose, patients and the public smile, receptive to what we have to say. Join the fun! Find out what a little levity will do for the listening skills of your audience.


    Just might wear my clown nose and hair during flu shot day to add some levity.
    Last edit by tnbutterfly on Oct 19, '12
  5. 0
    Quote from imjustme123
    ...What it comes down to is what people believe. Some believe the flu vaccine is good and beneficial for society as a whole and others don't.
    The efficacy of influenza vaccination has been has been demonstrated based on sound scientific principles, see llg's post above (Number 166). It is not a matter of personal belief; what people believe about flu vaccines being dangerous or ineffective is not science, but narrow-minded dogma.
  6. 0
    It is a rare time I would quibble with you. That said, find me the proof of reduced mortality/morbidity.
    The funny thing is the Vitamin D proponent Dr Cannel (sp), feels there might be a small posivtive effect from the vacine, but according to his statement, the evidence is not there to prove it. He feels the concommitent D deficiency is to blame.
    Quote from llg
    Sometimes, when experts come to a consensus about a issue ... they are right. One unified voice advocating for improved practice can be a good thing. No one is silencing voices on this issue. The scientific work to study and improve vaccines is ongoing. If new evidence appears that raises questions about the safety or efficacy of the vaccine, then that new evidence will be used to change policies and practice. That's the beauty of science.

    However, one of the other beauties of science is that as evidence mounts, employers (and individuals) have more information they can use to make decisions and set policies. In this case, scientists have reached a consensus that the benefits of the flu vaccines outweighs the risks for almost everyone. Leading scientitists and ethicists have agreed that the best evidence and the best ethical reasoning about the obligations that health care workers have to "do no harm" to their patients includes getting the influenza vaccine.

    People disagreeing with those scientists and ethicists are still free to present their evidence in support of the opposing view and have it reviewed by the scientific and ethics community. And society is still obliged to base its policies on the best evidence available -- which happens to now be on the side of influenza vaccine.
  7. 2
    Quote from Laidback Al
    The efficacy of influenza vaccination has been has been demonstrated based on sound scientific principles, see llg's post above (Number 166). It is not a matter of personal belief; what people believe about flu vaccines being dangerous or ineffective is not science, but narrow-minded dogma.
    I really do take issue with what you said here. There is science in both directions. We could both quote sources. I have respected everyone's beliefs here. I have not called anyone who believes in getting the vaccine narrow-minded, bad or anything else. However, people who do NOT believe in it (me) have been called narrow-minded, uncaring and that we basically want to kill people with the flu. That tells me a story. When people have to castigate someone for their beliefs it means to me that maybe their beliefs are not really all that sound and that maybe they are based more upon a mindset that others feel they must beat people into emotionally. That type of mindset gives me great pause on top of the lack of science to prove the flu vaccine really does what it says it does.
    loveoverpride and morte like this.
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    Last edit by JustBeachyNurse on Oct 18, '12 : Reason: formatting
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    For the first time in the 12 years I've worked at my hospital the flu shot is mandatory. The only exemption is a documented allergy. If you don't get it by 11/1 you will be terminated. I always get it but it is shocking to me.
  10. 0
    It is this economy and over supply of nurses. They can afford to make this move now.


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