Norway Reports An H1N1 Mutation

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    Quote from afludiary.blogspot.com
    ...Norwegian scientists are reporting a mutation found in a handful of samples that could increase the virulence of the virus Ė make it better adapted to deep lung tissues Ė which could make it more apt to cause severe viral pneumonias.

    There is a lot about this story we simply donít know yet.

    Prime among those is whether this mutated virus is capable of ongoing transmission, or if it is something that occurred spontaneously in a handful of victims.

    For now, officials are downplaying the idea that it might be circulating.
    More here: http://afludiary.blogspot.com/2009/1...-mutation.html
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    Norwegian Statement on the H1N1 Mutation

    Quote from afludiary.blogspot.com
    one mutation has caught special interest. It has been found in two patients who died from the new influenza A(H1N1) and in one patient with severe influenza disease. These were the two first patients who died from the new influenza in Norway. Some of those who died later have been examined without finding the same mutated virus.

    The mutation could possibly make the virus more prone to infect deeper in the airways and thus cause more severe disease.

    - We have analysed approximately 70 viruses from confirmed Norwegian cases and found the mutation in only these three patients, says Director General Geir Stene-Larsen at the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. - Based on what we know so far, it seems that the mutated virus does not circulate in the population, but might be a result of spontaneous changes which have occurred in these three patients.
    More at: http://afludiary.blogspot.com/2009/1...ted-virus.html
  5. 1
    WHO Statement on Norway Mutation

    Kind of a wishy washy statement from WHO. It sounds more like they actually don't know what it means.

    I believe that this mutation was first noted in Sao Paulo fatal cases which alerted
    some flu watchers to expect it elsewhere.

    Quote from afludiary.blogspot.com
    Worldwide, laboratory monitoring of influenza viruses has detected a similar mutation in viruses from several other countries, with the earliest detection occurring in April. In addition to Norway, the mutation has been observed in Brazil, China, Japan, Mexico, Ukraine, and the US.

    Although information on all these cases is incomplete, several viruses showing the same mutation were detected in fatal cases, and the mutation has also been detected in some mild cases. Worldwide, viruses from numerous fatal cases have not shown the mutation. The public health significance of this finding is thus unclear.

    The mutations appear to occur sporadically and spontaneously. To date, no links between the small number of patients infected with the mutated virus have been found and the mutation does not appear to spread.

    The significance of the mutation is being assessed by scientists in the WHO network of influenza laboratories. Changes in viruses at the genetic level need to be constantly monitored. However, the significance of these changes is difficult to assess. Many mutations do not alter any important features of the virus or the illness it causes. For this reason, WHO also uses clinical and epidemiological data when making risk assessments.

    Although further investigation is under way, no evidence currently suggests that these mutations are leading to an unusual increase in the number of H1N1 infections or a greater number of severe or fatal cases.
    More at: http://afludiary.blogspot.com/2009/1...-mutation.html
    WalkieTalkie likes this.
  6. 2
    It seems that in some cases the H1N1 resistant to Tamiflu, the news items below are from the US and UK



    http://www.kansascity.com/news/natio...y/1584195.html


    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/8370859.stm
    WalkieTalkie and indigo girl like this.
  7. 0
    trying to understand the norwegian swine flu mutations

    http://scienceblogs.com/effectmeasur..._the_norwe.php

    Quote from scienceblogs.com
    the mutation is being widely reported to be d222g (this is h1 numbering; it is 225 in h3 numbering). what this designation means is that in the spikes of hemagglutinin protein on the outside of the virus (parts of which elicit the primary immune response), the amino acid 222 places in from one end has changed from "d" (aspartate) to "g" (glycine). does this change in one of the team members make the virus operate much better? does it change the biology in any way, and if so, in what way. we don't know. and what does "better" mean in terms of the virus? we aren't sure of that either. the bottom line for the virus is that it make more copies of itself, but the factors that allow it to do that (e.g., should it become more virulent or less virulent?) are unpredictable and largely unknown. this is what this statement by who means:

    the significance of the mutation is being assessed by scientists in the who network of influenza laboratories. changes in viruses at the genetic level need to be constantly monitored. however, the significance of these changes is difficult to assess. many mutations do not alter any important features of the virus or the illness it causes. for this reason, who also uses clinical and epidemiological data when making risk assessments.
    the editors of effect measure are senior public health scientists and practitioners. paul revere was a member of the first local board of health in the united states (boston, 1799). the editors sign their posts "revere" to recognize the public service of a professional forerunner better known for other things.


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