which way should I go?

  1. [FONT=System]Hi there, I'm a forgien nurse and have 5 years experience in ICU and med/surg in my country. I've been away from nursing for 7 years. Recently, I completed RN refresher program. I get two choices to pick : med/surg or outpatient hemodialysis. I have read about hemodialysis nurse on this wed site, so I have some idea about it. Personally, I like acute care. I knew, acute care in US was so hectic, but it was challenging. Should I try be a med/surg nurse in US and transfer to dialysis later? Should I start at outpatient hemodialysis for a year and move to acute dialysis? The wage is just $1 more for med/surg. I have a hard time making a decision. One side told me to get to med/surg because I can move on to variety of nursing fields. The other said hemodialysis, so I'll deal with patient's body fluid only.
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    [FONT=System]Thanks,
    [FONT=System]Tato
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  2. 4 Comments

  3. by   DeLana_RN
    Hi, and welcome to the site!

    My advice would be to start with acute care - some kind of general hospital nursing (med/surg or stepdown) because it will not only give you a solid refresher - and let's face it, 7 years is a long time (I've been away from nursing for almost 2 years and know that I have a lot to relearn!) - but it will give you many more options later than outpatient dialysis would.

    After that year, you may not be interested in nephrology/dialysis at all - but if you are, try inpatient/acute first. You will be well-qualified then and (probably) have a much better experience than you would in an outpatient clinic (that's where I worked for 5+ years; the pace is very fast and may be overwhelming for someone who has been away from nursing for some time.)

    Just my 2 cents of course.

    Good luck with whatever you decide to do!

    DeLana
  4. by   tato
    [quote=tato][FONT=System]Hi, Thank you for your advice. Sometimes,I'm scared of fast paced environment in the hospital. The dialysis clinic, I'll get only 3 patients at the time. At the evening shift, I'll get 2 patients off and 3 on and then 3 off. I'll be a charge nurse within 1year or so.
    [FONT=System]The med/ortho unit in local setting hospital that I applyed for is a busy unit. I'll get orientation for 6 months.
    [FONT=System]Thank you again for your reply.
    [FONT=System]
    [FONT=System]Tato
  5. by   DeLana_RN
    [quote=tato]
    Quote from tato
    [FONT=System]Hi, Thank you for your advice. Sometimes,I'm scared of fast paced environment in the hospital. The dialysis clinic, I'll get only 3 patients at the time. At the evening shift, I'll get 2 patients off and 3 on and then 3 off. I'll be a charge nurse within 1year or so.
    [FONT=System]The med/ortho unit in local setting hospital that I applyed for is a busy unit. I'll get orientation for 6 months.
    [FONT=System]Thank you again for your reply.

    [FONT=System]Tato
    What kind of dialysis clinic is this? A large company? As an RN you have a lot more responsibilities than "just" getting your own patients on and off, usually you have to also do assessments, give meds etc. for the patients of your assigned PCTs as well; that's what makes it so hard. However, the pace on a late shift like you mention is usually much slower. Just be sure to ask about all these details (e.g., how many patients totally will I be responsible for? What other duties will I have? How long is the orientation/training period?)

    6 months orientation on a med/surg unit is great! What is the nurse : patient ratio? Day or night shift? Again, if you can get that experience you'll be ready for anything.

    I hope others will weigh in as well In the end, you may have to just go with your "gut feeling", whichever job seems right for you.

    Best of luck!

    DeLana
    Last edit by DeLana_RN on Oct 14, '06
  6. by   tato
    [quote=DeLana_RN][quote=tato]Hi, Thank you DeLana for giving me an idea which help me a lot.

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