Dialysis RN seeking staffing info

  1. Sorry tried to download instruction video. I did but I still cant veiw. So I apologize if my question in in the wrong area.

    Re; chronic hemodialysis, not peritoneal or acute please.
    Can I get some input from other Dialysis staff regarding ratio of RNs to patients. Mainly interested from MN RNs but others welcome too. We have a recommended 1 RN and to 12 patients, but that recently changed to 1 RN to 16 patients. This would include PCTs 1 to 4 patients. To clarrify; 1 RN and 3 PCT's to 12 patients, proposed is 1 RN and 4 PCTs to 16 patients.
    Feeling stressed with proposal, as Dialysis nurses know our clients are now older and sicker than they use to be in Out-Pt Clinics. And management does not staff accordingly to patient accuity. Only number of patients dialyzings used for staffing.
    More patients, more work, sicker patients, and PCTs who need constant direction.......feeling stressed.
    Please let me know your staffing ratios and where your Dialysis Out-Pt clinics are located.
    Im not a new-bee, been in Hemodialysis 29yrs, seen good changes but increased patient ratio to RN's is not a good change. Appears to be an increase in variances and decline in patient care.
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  2. 8 Comments

  3. by   sirI
    Hello, Marieee.

    I moved your thread to the Dialysis forum for a better response.
  4. by   hemorn1
    I'm in Ok. At my facility we had 1 nurse and 1 PCT for 8 patients. The nurses set up machines, put on patients, and passed meds too. Basically 1 to 4 patient staff ratio.
  5. by   klnblueshoes
    NW AR staffig ratio 1 to 4 direct, oversee 4 more patients with tech
  6. by   DeLana_RN
    Wow, an RN having to put on 4 pts and work with a PCT (which I assume means assessing all their pts and giving their heparin, although this varies from state to state) sounds excessive. When I worked in a Southeastern HD clinic, the RN put on 2 pts and was responsible for one or two PCTs who each had 4 pts to put on (usually, however, it was one PCT and one LPN; the LPNs could assess their own pts and give heparin, which helped a lot). Still, it was a heavy load (1 RN to 10 pts).

    Maybe working with PCTs and not having to put on pts as well makes it somewhat easier; however, 1:16 sounds excessive even then.

    DeLana

    P.S. That's why I'm now in acute/inpatient dialysis. Our ratio is 1:1, with an all-nurse (mostly RN) staff.
  7. by   sueinga
    Here in GA its 1 RN to 10 pts and 1 PCT to 4 pts. I have 5 catheter pts that I must put on as only nurses connect catheter pts, tho the PCT monitors until time for me to take off. RN is to push all heparins and give all meds on 10 pts tho.
  8. by   DeLana_RN
    Quote from sueinga
    Here in GA its 1 RN to 10 pts and 1 PCT to 4 pts. I have 5 catheter pts that I must put on as only nurses connect catheter pts, tho the PCT monitors until time for me to take off. RN is to push all heparins and give all meds on 10 pts tho.
    That's a lot! Do they have to put 5 permcath pts on one team with only one RN? And the RN has to give all heparins and, I assume, do all assessments before the pts are put on?

    I can only imagine turnover

    Good luck,

    DeLana
  9. by   molo70
    I am curious to see if and when ratios get regulated-- how bad does it have to get???
    Last edit by molo70 on Feb 6, '07
  10. by   molo70
    In VA staffing has changed greatly-- 1 RN to a unit if 20 chairs or less, 4-5 PCT,s No LPN/LVN. 3 out of my four days I had a section and charge responsibility. This has caused me to leave and seek employment into another speciality. I absolutely loved dialysis-- acute and chronic but due to safety and decreased staffing of nurses felt it was no longer safe. If I had any call outs I also had a section of 4, along with all meds, assess, other nursing functions, transportation issues-- If census below 108 a MSW is part time. Healthcare is a business, that was always the respose I got. I know some states are regluated in out pt centers-- VA is not. Hopefully things will improve for the pts sake.

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