"Why are you here?"

  1. I've had gotten this question a couple of times already everytime a patient asks me if I'm a nurse or a tech. Whenever they find out I'm an RN, they always ask me "Why are you here? You're a good nurse. You should work in a hospital!" To my surprise, most of them think being in a dialysis is a ****** job for an RN. I always tell my patients that dialysis is special to me. Helping people extend their lives daily and actually being a part of it makes me happy. I actually love what I'm doing. If only these patients see and appreciate our efforts, that would be really nice.... Until then, I'll continue to do what I love to do.
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  2. 39 Comments

  3. by   Farawyn
    Dialysis is the real deal, and my renal patients were often my most complicated. Kudos to you!
  4. by   AcuteHD
    I agree, dialysis is a great specialty. Of course it has plenty of ups and downs, great pts and a "few" less compliant ones (lol), and lots of opportunities to learn and grow as a nurse. Continue with passion and the appreciation will come.

    Quote from foxy1112
    If only these patients see and appreciate our efforts, that would be really nice.... Until then, I'll continue to do what I love to do.
    Just to be a little snarky: This sounds like you plan on quitting as soon as the patients appreciate you. Have fun! :-)
  5. by   foxy1112
    Quote from AcuteHD
    I agree, dialysis is a great specialty. Of course it has plenty of ups and downs, great pts and a "few" less compliant ones (lol), and lots of opportunities to learn and grow as a nurse. Continue with passion and the appreciation will come.



    Just to be a little snarky: This sounds like you plan on quitting as soon as the patients appreciate you. Have fun! :-)
    Lol, that's not what I meant. From where I'm from, patients are very unappreciative. They treat dialysis as a burden rather than an opportunity. I always remind them back in the days when dialysis treatments were only given to selected patients who were only considered useful to the environment. I tell them how blessed they are to have this opportunity nowadays; to be dialyzed 3x/week.. But unfortunately, they don't see it that way...
  6. by   foxy1112
    Quote from Farawyn
    Dialysis is the real deal, and my renal patients were often my most complicated. Kudos to you!
    Thank you.
  7. by   Farawyn
    Quote from foxy1112
    Lol, that's not what I meant. From where I'm from, patients are very unappreciative. They treat dialysis as a burden rather than an opportunity. I always remind them back in the days when dialysis treatments were only given to selected patients who were only considered useful to the environment. I tell them how blessed they are to have this opportunity nowadays; to be dialyzed 3x/week.. But unfortunately, they don't see it that way...
    Well, I see what you are saying, but it is a burden, too.
    Dialysis patients have every single aspect of their lives controlled: what they eat, what meds they can take, what they drink, they are often diabetics, ports, fistulas, infections... It's a rough road, as you know. Those that do look at it as a chance for a better life maybe do so intermittently at best. I haven't met too many that can.
    I'm not a dialysis nurse. Nor am I a dialysis patient.
    In my experience though, I don't really remind patients what they should be appreciative of, and that their burden is not their burden.
  8. by   AcuteHD
    Quote from foxy1112
    I tell them how blessed they are to have this opportunity nowadays; to be dialyzed 3x/week
    Mmmm, I know where you're coming from but I would be reluctant to call dialysis a blessing to the pts. Imagine a spoiled, trust fund brat telling you that having a job must be such a blessing. Even though it is we don't want to hear it from them.
  9. by   AcuteHD
    Dangit, Farawyn, stop posting what I'm gonna post before I post it. Give the slow kids a chance. LOL!
  10. by   foxy1112
    Quote from Farawyn
    Well, I see what you are saying, but it is a burden, too.
    Dialysis patients have every single aspect of their lives controlled: what they eat, what meds they can take, what they drink, they are often diabetics, ports, fistulas, infections... It's a rough road, as you know. Those that do look at it as a chance for a better life maybe do so intermittently at best. I haven't met too many that can.
    I'm not a dialysis nurse. Nor am I a dialysis patient.
    In my experience though, I don't really remind patients what they should be appreciative of, and that their burden is not their burden.
    I see your point. I know that it is very stressful and difficult for them. However, I don't want to add any more negativity to their experience. Just need to be optimistic as much as possible until they get their kidney transplant 👌
  11. by   foxy1112
    Quote from AcuteHD
    Mmmm, I know where you're coming from but I would be reluctant to call dialysis a blessing to the pts. Imagine a spoiled, trust fund brat telling you that having a job must be such a blessing. Even though it is we don't want to hear it from them.
    If they need dialysis back in the 70's, it would've been different, a lot of them probably won't survive. Nowadays, every patients have a chance. Even those who don't have insurance and documents are not getting denied of the services. Every treatment is a chance for life, so if that's not something to be thankful of, I don't know what is. Patients can always refuse dialysis treatment too, right? The fact that they're coming 3x/week means that they're actually making a conscious effort every single day in extending their lives.
  12. by   foxy1112
    Quote from AcuteHD
    Mmmm, I know where you're coming from but I would be reluctant to call dialysis a blessing to the pts. Imagine a spoiled, trust fund brat telling you that having a job must be such a blessing. Even though it is we don't want to hear it from them.
    I can't really compare them to trust fund kids. Coz when trust fund kids won't work, they still have money. If dialysis patients won't dialyze, they're dead. I saw a poster once that says "DIALYSIS: damned if you do. Dead if you don't." Well, that's so true
  13. by   Farawyn
    Quote from foxy1112
    If they need dialysis back in the 70's, it would've been different, a lot of them probably won't survive. Nowadays, every patients have a chance. Even those who don't have insurance and documents are not getting denied of the services. Every treatment is a chance for life, so if that's not something to be thankful of, I don't know what is. Patients can always refuse dialysis treatment too, right? The fact that they're coming 3x/week means that they're actually making a conscious effort every single day in extending their lives.
    Most people want to live. I don't know how conscious that is as opposed to self preservation.
    As for patients in the 70s, most patients don't care, because they cannot see beyond their own pain/suffering.
    If a nurse told me how lucky I was to be on dialysis I may not take that too well.
  14. by   foxy1112
    Quote from Farawyn
    Most people want to live. I don't know how conscious that is as opposed to self preservation.
    As for patients in the 70s, most patients don't care, because they cannot see beyond their own pain/suffering.
    If a nurse told me how lucky I was to be on dialysis I may not take that too well.
    That's why a lot of patients are also depressed coz they see things as 'what should be' instead of 'what is'

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