Nurses with Diabetes - page 4

by gypsyangelrn 14,101 Views | 36 Comments

My life changed this week. I was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. Fasting bs in the 400s :uhoh3: My doctor is wonderful....started on metformin, up to 1000 mg today. My fasting was 256 this AM...and I am struggling to get... Read More


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    I don't know if anyone will read this since this thread is pretty old, but I have type I diabetes and would love to become a nurse. Since I am currently (and unexpectedly) unemployed, I would loved to do an rn program. I have actually taken all the testing and would be able to start a program pretty soon. The one thing that is holding me back is the diabetes. I've been diagnosed with it for a little over ten years, but my body can still act pretty unpredictably. I try to eat at the same times everyday, even the same foods, but I still get hypoglycemic episodes. So, I guess my question is is there a place for me in nursing? Thank you so much for your responses.
  2. 0
    Quote from LouLou215
    I don't know if anyone will read this since this thread is pretty old, but I have type I diabetes and would love to become a nurse. Since I am currently (and unexpectedly) unemployed, I would loved to do an rn program. I have actually taken all the testing and would be able to start a program pretty soon. The one thing that is holding me back is the diabetes. I've been diagnosed with it for a little over ten years, but my body can still act pretty unpredictably. I try to eat at the same times everyday, even the same foods, but I still get hypoglycemic episodes. So, I guess my question is is there a place for me in nursing? Thank you so much for your responses.
    I'm successfully managing being an RN with type 1 diabetes. I know several other RNs with type 1.
  3. 0
    I'm a RN with Type 1 also. There are Olympic gold medal athletes with Type 1. We can do anything!
  4. 0
    Thank you for the replies. Is it difficult to find time to check your numbers, feed yourselves, etc.?
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    I am in my final year of being a nursing student (only a few weeks to go!!) and have had type 1 diabetes for 7 years. I like to let as many people around me know as muc as possible because then I can feel safe on the ward. I know that if on the odd chance that i passed out or anything (which has never happened!), the staff know I have type 1, which greatly reduces my anxiety. I am lucky and have very good blood sugar levels (5-8mmol/L....not sure of the American levels) but i run them a bit higher for the first few days of my clinical experiences so I give myself a few units less of novorapid or a little more to eat before work with the same dosage of insulin. So I run myself about 10-12 for a few days until i get used to the routine. I have had hypos (sugar lows) on the ward before but I just tell my buddy nurse, go and have some lollies and a muesli bar, take about 5-10 minutes and I'm good to go again. I've never run into a problem really. All the staff are always helpful and understanding. I always make sure I have some lollies in my pocket because as a nurse you might have to go and pick someone up from surgery or take them to the taxi etc for disacharge. I work an 8 hour shift and have a 15 minute and a 45 minute break which is plenty of time for me to sort out my diabetes doses and eat lunch etc. All the staff always say I can have an extra 5 minutes or so if necessary. As nurses are very busy and rely on their concentration and the ability to walk around, taking an extra 5 minutes to sort out a hypo or to eat enough food is vital for patient safety. I have only experienced one thing as a nurse with type 1 that was a bit too complicated and that was working as a theatre nurse as I could obviously not eat in theatre or just walk out at the patient was being prepared.

    I actually decided to be a nurse because I want to help people become healthier diabetics! You don't have to be unwell with diabetes, so I basically want to dedicate my life to that cause! It's a great career with many opportunities. You could be a orthopaedic, paediatric, emergency, intensive care, paramedic, diabetic educator, midwife, theatre or medical nurse!
    nurturing_angel likes this.
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    I hope you see an edocrinologist. Personally, I think your BS is still too high and the metformin may not be sufficient. I know I felt a lot better once I got under control and that happened only with long acting insulin (Lantus).

    As for working, I made two med errors due to fatique, blurry vision and not being able to concentrate. Consider what you are capable of doing before returning to work.
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    I hope you see an edocrinologist. Personally, I think your BS is still too high and the metformin may not be sufficient. I know I felt a lot better once I got under control and that happened only with long acting insulin (Lantus).

    As for working, I made two med errors due to fatique, blurry vision and not being able to concentrate. Consider what you are capable of doing before returning to work. That happened years ago. I finally had to quit 12 hr shifts and find another nursing position with 8 hour shifts.


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