Nurses with Diabetes - page 4

My life changed this week. I was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. Fasting bs in the 400s :uhoh3: My doctor is wonderful....started on metformin, up to 1000 mg today. My fasting was 256 this... Read More

  1. Visit  vickynurse profile page
    0
    Quote from KrisRNwannabe
    \i am still very overwhelmed by this. it is difficult being a nurse in this situation.

    I know where you are coming from. I've known for about a week. This thread is very helpful. I took the metformin for the first time today and have been under 150 ever since! Have to work tomorrow and am undecided about taking the med because I still fear hypoglycemia. I still need to make my appt with the dietician an am just winging it for now. I agree with llg that testing often will help me to stay honest with myself.
    I've found a few sites that are helpful to me, and they may be to you as well, when you are ready.
    http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/diabeticdiet.html
    http://www.joslin.org/managing_your_diabetes_2854.asp
    http://www.mayoclinic.com/print/diabetes-diet
  2. Visit  Sirius Black profile page
    0
    Hi,
    I'm not a nurse yet, still a student. I was diagnosed with type 1 November last year. Was a bit of a shock since I was 19 when diagnosed (20 now) - I thought only kids and younger teenagers got type 1.

    But it was caught early, I knew the signs, but blamed it on other things until I started losing weight. My bsl was only 25.1mmol/l (451) and ketones were only .6.

    I've been managing fine while on clinicals, but do drop my dose of lantus and novorapid (insulin aspart) so I run a higher than usual. I'm still scared of hypos even though I've had a 1.6 (28) and 1.8 (32) & got through both okay. Also too embarrassed to let anyone around me know or find out I have D.
    Do you all let those you work with know about your D or do you keep it to yourself?
  3. Visit  vickynurse profile page
    0
    Quote from Sirius Black
    Hi,
    . Also too embarrassed to let anyone around me know or find out I have D.
    Do you all let those you work with know about your D or do you keep it to yourself?
    Your instructor should be aware for your safety. I've only told one of my coworkers so far, but will need to tell more.
  4. Visit  classicdame profile page
    0
    I found it hard to work at night, mostly because I was too lazy to bring my own food and the did not make good choices in the cafeteria. Also, it was not open till 0100, so I was at work 8 hours before food was available. I work days now and have learned to manage my blood sugars much better. As for "too high" numbers. The ADA recommends your blood sugar be less than 130 at all times. I found it hard to concentrate when my bs was higher than 150 or so. And on two occasions I had to be rescued at work when my BS was < 70. So the key is to monitor frequently, hydrate yourself, eat right and be glad there are things you can do to stay healthy!
  5. Visit  LouLou215 profile page
    0
    I don't know if anyone will read this since this thread is pretty old, but I have type I diabetes and would love to become a nurse. Since I am currently (and unexpectedly) unemployed, I would loved to do an rn program. I have actually taken all the testing and would be able to start a program pretty soon. The one thing that is holding me back is the diabetes. I've been diagnosed with it for a little over ten years, but my body can still act pretty unpredictably. I try to eat at the same times everyday, even the same foods, but I still get hypoglycemic episodes. So, I guess my question is is there a place for me in nursing? Thank you so much for your responses.
  6. Visit  blondy2061h profile page
    0
    Quote from LouLou215
    I don't know if anyone will read this since this thread is pretty old, but I have type I diabetes and would love to become a nurse. Since I am currently (and unexpectedly) unemployed, I would loved to do an rn program. I have actually taken all the testing and would be able to start a program pretty soon. The one thing that is holding me back is the diabetes. I've been diagnosed with it for a little over ten years, but my body can still act pretty unpredictably. I try to eat at the same times everyday, even the same foods, but I still get hypoglycemic episodes. So, I guess my question is is there a place for me in nursing? Thank you so much for your responses.
    I'm successfully managing being an RN with type 1 diabetes. I know several other RNs with type 1.
  7. Visit  CoffeeGeekRN profile page
    0
    I'm a RN with Type 1 also. There are Olympic gold medal athletes with Type 1. We can do anything!
  8. Visit  LouLou215 profile page
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    Thank you for the replies. Is it difficult to find time to check your numbers, feed yourselves, etc.?
  9. Visit  Mish89 profile page
    1
    I am in my final year of being a nursing student (only a few weeks to go!!) and have had type 1 diabetes for 7 years. I like to let as many people around me know as muc as possible because then I can feel safe on the ward. I know that if on the odd chance that i passed out or anything (which has never happened!), the staff know I have type 1, which greatly reduces my anxiety. I am lucky and have very good blood sugar levels (5-8mmol/L....not sure of the American levels) but i run them a bit higher for the first few days of my clinical experiences so I give myself a few units less of novorapid or a little more to eat before work with the same dosage of insulin. So I run myself about 10-12 for a few days until i get used to the routine. I have had hypos (sugar lows) on the ward before but I just tell my buddy nurse, go and have some lollies and a muesli bar, take about 5-10 minutes and I'm good to go again. I've never run into a problem really. All the staff are always helpful and understanding. I always make sure I have some lollies in my pocket because as a nurse you might have to go and pick someone up from surgery or take them to the taxi etc for disacharge. I work an 8 hour shift and have a 15 minute and a 45 minute break which is plenty of time for me to sort out my diabetes doses and eat lunch etc. All the staff always say I can have an extra 5 minutes or so if necessary. As nurses are very busy and rely on their concentration and the ability to walk around, taking an extra 5 minutes to sort out a hypo or to eat enough food is vital for patient safety. I have only experienced one thing as a nurse with type 1 that was a bit too complicated and that was working as a theatre nurse as I could obviously not eat in theatre or just walk out at the patient was being prepared.

    I actually decided to be a nurse because I want to help people become healthier diabetics! You don't have to be unwell with diabetes, so I basically want to dedicate my life to that cause! It's a great career with many opportunities. You could be a orthopaedic, paediatric, emergency, intensive care, paramedic, diabetic educator, midwife, theatre or medical nurse!
    nurturing_angel likes this.
  10. Visit  classicdame profile page
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    I hope you see an edocrinologist. Personally, I think your BS is still too high and the metformin may not be sufficient. I know I felt a lot better once I got under control and that happened only with long acting insulin (Lantus).

    As for working, I made two med errors due to fatique, blurry vision and not being able to concentrate. Consider what you are capable of doing before returning to work.
  11. Visit  classicdame profile page
    0
    I hope you see an edocrinologist. Personally, I think your BS is still too high and the metformin may not be sufficient. I know I felt a lot better once I got under control and that happened only with long acting insulin (Lantus).

    As for working, I made two med errors due to fatique, blurry vision and not being able to concentrate. Consider what you are capable of doing before returning to work. That happened years ago. I finally had to quit 12 hr shifts and find another nursing position with 8 hour shifts.

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