Hearing impaired RN wants to work but------ - page 2

by stilquilty | 19,031 Views | 33 Comments

I am an RN with more than 20yrs high risk L&D exp. After a 5yr illness that left me deaf in one ear, and with only 70% in the other ear. I'm wondering if it is realistic to think I can return to nursing with impaired hearing.... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from Marvie
    Well, for that person's info I am a deaf RN and I work in the OR. Just because I can lip read does not mean that is all I can do. I do wear 2 BTE aids and I do have some residual hearing It may not be much but with the hearing aids, I have been very successful and do quite well. Yes that comment was a bit insensitive and is the type of ignorant comments I often hear. Yes I am deaf. Yes I work in the Operating room. So there!:deadhorse
    Hi!
    Would like to know if working in the OR don't require you to use a steth? What I mean is, with the hearing aid in place,I would imagine with this in our ears, plus the steth? will really be a problem.Hope to hear from you since I am considering too working in the OR. Thanks.
  2. 1
    In the OR, the only person who uses a stethescope is the anesthesiologist. I have never had to be faced with the possibility of having to use on. Pre op and recovery use them. Good luck to you.
    SuesquatchRN likes this.
  3. 0
    Quote from Marvie
    In the OR, the only person who uses a stethescope is the anesthesiologist. I have never had to be faced with the possibility of having to use on. Pre op and recovery use them. Good luck to you.
    Thanks for your response.
    How about the difficulty of hearing with conversation with the mask? I am sure everyone is wearing mask in this area.With the hearing aid in place,is there any difficulty? Thanks for any input.I really appreciated all the informations I got here.It erases my doubt of my capability to realize my dream in this nursing field despite my impairment.
  4. 0
    I'm mild to moderately HOH but can function without my monaural aid, which is a good thing since I lost it a few weeks ago and am waiting for the replacement to comeine.

    Until I got it I didn't realize how much compensating I did. It took me a few days to be able to function well again s it.
  5. 0
    Hi everybody! I am new to All nurses after being referred here from a fellow nursing student to hopefully get some insight to a problem I am having. I am in my fourth semester of nursing school. Like most of you posting, I am hearing impaired. I have bilateral cochlear implants. Because of this I am not able to use a regular stethoscope and I have gotten through the program by using a stethoscope that hooks up to a PDA which graphs the sounds coming through. I then visualize the heart and lung sounds and have become quite good at deciphering the different sounds. Those of you that have prior hearing would probably have a much easier time than I did in learning to distinguish the different sounds with your eyes. The new problem that I am facing is using the telephone. I am aware that there are many avenues to nursing that do not require the use of the telephone but I am really set on working with patients on a hospital unit. I am able to use my cell phone to talk to friends and family and my instructor but unable to use a landline as it is analog, I do much better with digital service. The problem in the hospital is that my cell phone is not in line with the intercommunication system, as well as overwhelming background noise and Dr's with little patience. In the past I have used a relay service with VCO (voice carry over) which allows me to speak directly to the other person and when they respond an operator would type it to me. I am at a loss with finding any products that are mobile and allow the user intercommunication features. So my question is have any of you ever had a similar experience? I am fully functional in communication in person just lack the telephone ability..... Any suggestions?
  6. 0
    ok, this is to address canoehead, llg, and marvie.....

    1. Canoehead question was a legit one, and apparently you missed the smiley face at the end of his question.

    2. llg, maybe you should get your feelings off of your sleeve. Refer to #1.

    3. marvie, thanks for answering. But you too should not take it as a slight, if you were a perfectly hearing individual who came across the same situation, you would wonder yourself...but maybe to scared to ask.

    I am a completely deaf RN and have only been deaf for 4.5 yrs. I went on disability initially after losing my hearing, but decided this past fall to return to nursing. I do have an Auditory Brainstem Implant and use a e-scope to ausciltate lung sounds/heart tones. I was just recently rehired back into my local hospital's ER, since that is where the majority of my experience is from. To be honest, when using some of the stories on here to convince my ER manager that it could be done, I referred to marvies story and wondered how that could be accomplished with the mask issue.

    So, everybody simmer down and just answer the question. We that are hoh/deaf choose to let these types of comments be bothersome, I choose to use it as a teaching point.
  7. 0
    Your comments leave us who ARE deaf or HOH wondering.... what exactly is your point? And what teaching point are you referring to? I am not a 'perfectly hearing person' if you read my earlier posts. Masks cover the face and since everyone's hearing loss is different ( some feel vibrations, others don't. etc...) but in truth, a person's eyes and body language speak volumes, even if they are not aware of it. The mask issue has been asked of me so many times that I am wondering why the fascination? If an RN does their job, knows their job, anticipates possible needs for a particular situation and knows what to do in the event of things not going smoothly, and pays attention, always keeping patient safety first- then even a barrier like a mask isn't really an issue. If you go back to my earlier posts, you will see that I only give encouragement for anyone with a hearing limitation who have chosen to violate the hearing world's expectations of those who are not 'perfectly hearing', especially those who work in areas that other's deem impossible for deaf/hoh. More power to ALL nurses deaf/hoh or "perfectly" hearing for being Nurses.





    Quote from derektrn97
    ok, this is to address canoehead, llg, and marvie.....

    1. Canoehead question was a legit one, and apparently you missed the smiley face at the end of his question.

    2. llg, maybe you should get your feelings off of your sleeve. Refer to #1.

    3. marvie, thanks for answering. But you too should not take it as a slight, if you were a perfectly hearing individual who came across the same situation, you would wonder yourself...but maybe to scared to ask.

    I am a completely deaf RN and have only been deaf for 4.5 yrs. I went on disability initially after losing my hearing, but decided this past fall to return to nursing. I do have an Auditory Brainstem Implant and use a e-scope to ausciltate lung sounds/heart tones. I was just recently rehired back into my local hospital's ER, since that is where the majority of my experience is from. To be honest, when using some of the stories on here to convince my ER manager that it could be done, I referred to marvies story and wondered how that could be accomplished with the mask issue.

    So, everybody simmer down and just answer the question. We that are hoh/deaf choose to let these types of comments be bothersome, I choose to use it as a teaching point.
  8. 2
    My point is, it was a legitimate question. Nothing more, nothing less. Why you or any other HOH person gets ***** is beyond me. I deal with the same issues you do, but to a degree more. I don't get ***** if someone asks me how I accomplish something. Why do you have to or anyone else for that matter.

    It is answers like yours and llg's that can cause the divide already between us and the "hearing world" to widen. Just calmly answer the question. Is that really hard?
    I never said or infered you were a perfectly hearing person, just that those who are, would probably wonder the same thing the original poster of the question did? I have read your previous posts, and if you had read my rebuttal, you would have notice or acknowledge that I used your personal story to prove barriers can be broke down.
    I have dealt with narrow minded thinking individuals in my quest for re-introduction into my nursing career. So, how far do you think I would have gotten if I responded like you or llg to a similar question of theirs?
    rainstorm83 and BernieRN like this.
  9. 0
    Probably as far as you are getting with me with your comments that indicate frustration and slight hostility....NOT VERY FAR.







    Quote from derektrn97
    My point is, it was a legitimate question. Nothing more, nothing less. Why you or any other HOH person gets ***** is beyond me. I deal with the same issues you do, but to a degree more. I don't get ***** if someone asks me how I accomplish something. Why do you have to or anyone else for that matter.

    It is answers like yours and llg's that can cause the divide already between us and the "hearing world" to widen. Just calmly answer the question. Is that really hard?
    I never said or infered you were a perfectly hearing person, just that those who are, would probably wonder the same thing the original poster of the question did? I have read your previous posts, and if you had read my rebuttal, you would have notice or acknowledge that I used your personal story to prove barriers can be broke down.
    I have dealt with narrow minded thinking individuals in my quest for re-introduction into my nursing career. So, how far do you think I would have gotten if I responded like you or llg to a similar question of theirs?
  10. 0
    agreed, good luck.


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