CNA Duties in MR/DD?

  1. 1
    Hello
    I am currently in CNA training and have a great interest in this field. I am wanting to know what the typical duties are as a CNA? Would it be beneficial for me to get my Medication Aide certificate or will this be something that is typically taught on the job? I have worked in this field as a "Job Coach" and really enjoyed it. Thanks so much in advance for your responses.
    Davey Do likes this.
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  4. 8 Comments so far...

  5. 1
    Quote from DreamChaser81
    Hello
    I am currently in CNA training and have a great interest in this field. I am wanting to know what the typical duties are as a CNA? Would it be beneficial for me to get my Medication Aide certificate or will this be something that is typically taught on the job? I have worked in this field as a "Job Coach" and really enjoyed it. Thanks so much in advance for your responses.
    Well, I am a CNA and my duties include getting the people up, dressed, bathed, fed, medicated and then cleaning the whole house. Glorified maids and babysitters, in a nutshell. But it can very rewarding, too.
    Davey Do likes this.
  6. 1
    It depends upon the state you reside in. In some states you have to take a class and become certified to pass medications. I would absolutely recommend that you take the course. In other states, there is a med class that you must take, but not necessarily a certification.

    Working as a CNA you have the opportunity to help someone else live their life to the fullest. It's very rewarding.
    Davey Do likes this.
  7. 2
    I live in Ohio and I'm a Support Spec for individuals w/ developmental disabilities. I'm not a CNA. I have been certified to administer meds under delegated nursing. This training was provided through my employer.
    Davey Do and rotteluvr31 like this.
  8. 2
    I worked as an aide in a group home setting for 15 years. Our training to be med certified was done on the job. Vitals are so important to med passes as many require daily vitals before meds can be given. Knowing the abbreviations for communication usage was also helpful when reading orders from the RN's.It was not a requirement to be a CNA where I worked but I had the advantage with what I was taught in CNA class.
    mpreavis and Davey Do like this.
  9. 4
    Good Enquiry, Dreamchaser81! Excellent responses!

    Having worked at a State Facility, at that time serving both MI and DD clients, I can tell you that working with a CNA and/or Med Tech was an added plus. Co-workers trained to monitor VS and Clients' responses to medication is a true asset.

    In fact, the very first night I worked as the lone RN on a Unit, a CNA told me something like, "The Patient is exhibiting (this). I'd ask the Doctor for an order for (that)". I followed the CNA's advice and the CNA was right!

    You all are with the Patients or Clients much more than the Nurses are and are more ware of any changes or anomalies. Possessing the knowledge of what to look for at what time and communicating the information to the Nurse results in better Client/Patient care.

    Keep up the good work!
  10. 1
    The facility I work in has a guardian who is over about half the residents. He values our (CNA's) input greatly. I remember one weekend it took repeated attempts to convince a RN that a resident needed immediate medical attention. Finally he was transported to the hospital and admitted. His guardian told me in the future that for any of his residents just call 911 if I feel something is wrong. He values our observations etc. since we are with them more. I have great respect and admiration for the work of LPN'S/RN'S. The decisions that they have to make has to be stressful on them.
    Davey Do likes this.
  11. 0
    Depends on the facility! If you know where you are wanting to work, call them and discuss your options and what would make you a qualified candidate.

    Responsible for providing assistance with ADLs (activities of daily living) and homemaking to clients with intellectual developmental disabilities. Assisted with meal preparation, personal outings, changing soiled linens, oral care, bathing/showering residents, skin care, dressing, exercise assistance, feeding, laundry, and activities outlined in the care plan for growth and development. Assisted other DSA’s with crisis prevention/management if necessary. Accountable for implementing the service and care plan that is designed for a particular client. Observed, recorded and reported all changes in behavior or health status to supervisor.

    That is what I put on my on my resume that covers the CNA duties I provided. We were trained as Medtechs, which is something you mention in your post. Again, I would call around and see if they provide paid training on this (if they do, that's your best option.)

    You do bond with these clients, you learn their stories and see them basically 5 days a week. They become such a huge part of your life, so be prepared to handle that emotionally. It can be a bit more intimate than working at a large long-term facility, and you will find that some companies are more concerned than others with the clients!

    I wish you the best of luck!
  12. 1
    Kind of old thread, but I really like putting out as much info as possible about this field. I work for a very large, non-profit organization that supports folks with ID/DD in group homes, apartments and/or living at home with their families. I am the nurse for one of the counties we serve and I can easily say that 95% of the direct support staff have little to no health care experience, the remaining 5% have worked as CNA's. I truly value the DSP's with a CNA background, as they are comfortable taking vitals and don't think twice about assisting individuals with hygiene/personal care. We have an intensive training class that all staff must pass to be able to pass meds and after that their med passes are observed by the house manager or myself until all of us are comfortable with their ability to pass meds.

    One difficult "thing" for some CNA's-getting out of the habit of doing "everything" for the individuals that live in the group homes, as we want to encourage as much independence as possible. Sometimes it takes a little while, it can be a tough habit to break.
    mpreavis likes this.


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