why is the corrections facility hiring so much? - page 2

by luckie 15,780 Views | 22 Comments

Hi I hae been reading the post about corrections nursing and I noticed people who wanted to work there got hired. I also noticed that there is almost always openings. Is that due to high turn over or because the prisons are... Read More


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    Correctional facilities house some very sick people. Many are very high risk due to lifestyle choices, poverty and a "less than adequate" start in life. Most of the problems are multigenerational and become more severe with each generation. Many are mentally ill and/or mentally retarded and neglected any type of basic health care before entering the correctional system. Correctional facilities also house elderly, frail and terminal people who will die inside of the facilities. This all adds up to increased health care need and cost. There is plenty of self inflicted lung, cardiovascular, renal and hepatic disease as well as brain damage and cancer inside of the "walls."
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    If you notice a continuous high turnover or constant hiring at a specific facility, maybe you should investigate more. Facilities that invest in experienced staff and offer comprehensive training are the ones to aim for. Typically, correctional nursing has a higher base pay than other facilities. Correctional health offers it's own challenges and rewards that can not compare to any other nursing specialty. Speaking with current or former employees would be ideal, though that may prove difficult. Also, nurses, as a rule have a caring nature and find difficulty with the boundaries that are NECESSARY in this field. The population served can be extreme; addition, mental health, suicidal, homicidal, manipulative, bored...the list is endless and medical staff HAS to be alert. If the detention staff and/or the medical staff are not supportive of the front line, then seriously consider applying elsewhere. High turnover or continual hiring would be a big red flag for me....I first went into correctional healthcare in 2000.
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    I work in a state prison and I rarely worry about getting raped or killed. You are never without an officer, alarm, whistle. The inmates are generally respectful and appreciative of the care you give them. It is rare for someone to be attacked physically. As a nurse your job is not security as that is the realm of the officers. I actually feel safer then in a hospital where patients can be violent and backup is slow in coming. The burnout occurs because the bureaucracy is demanding, technology outdated, and policies change daily. I am pretty happy with my job and feel I am getting excellent experience as a new nurse. As for treating child molesters, you do not read the c files of the inmates so generally you don't know what the crimes are. In the end you could be treating a child molester in a regular hospital. Who know the history of each person and why should that change the type of care you deliver as a nurse?
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    High Turnover is a big issue at my unit. As a matter of fact, I am leaving corrections soon due to the environment. I work at a Maximum secrity prison in arkansas and I don't like it at all. The inmates treat you like pieces of meat and talk horrible to you...among other things. I'm going back to Long term care...
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    I am in NC and the prison is building brand new medical facilities. I think the work would be interesting and a challange! A lot fo RN's I talk to love it! The pay and benefits are great. As far as treating someone I know is a child molester, or murderer? We treat them at the large university hospitals now, and I can't not treat them just because I don't like them or what they do. Unfortunately, with the closing of many inpatient and outpatient psych facilities and resources, we are seeing more and more patients in the acute care setting who have the same issues as those who are locked up. It's sad.

    If anyone is currently working or considering working in the Central Prison system in Raleigh, NC, I'd love to talk to you!
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    Quote from bonesrn
    I am in NC and the prison is building brand new medical facilities. I think the work would be interesting and a challange! A lot fo RN's I talk to love it! The pay and benefits are great. As far as treating someone I know is a child molester, or murderer? We treat them at the large university hospitals now, and I can't not treat them just because I don't like them or what they do. Unfortunately, with the closing of many inpatient and outpatient psych facilities and resources, we are seeing more and more patients in the acute care setting who have the same issues as those who are locked up. It's sad.

    If anyone is currently working or considering working in the Central Prison system in Raleigh, NC, I'd love to talk to you!
    Hey bonesrn,

    I am considering workin at the women's prison in Raleigh as a new grad. I applied to central prison but only the women's prison has contacted me so far. Do you know if it's a good place to work?
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    Hi, I will be graduating soon from nursing school, and I am very interested in working as a correctional facility RN. Can anyone provide information about the the best state facilities to work in California? Thank you.
    Last edit by andreopolys on Apr 27, '13
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    Quote from luckie
    Thanks Everyone! Interesting post. I still cant understand why more people dont want to go to the prison.

    BTW I did not get the job Feel like Im the only one who is banging on the prison doors to get in lol
    As a new LPN grad I've applied to a couple of corrections openings. I do have a background in security and training in PCI as well. No callbacks yet So I suppose for me corrections isn't going to be any easier to get into than anywhere else. I am entirely open to working in a correctional facility, if I am asked to sign on......
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    I am a DON for the Department of Corrections in a western state. We don't have a lot of turnover. Two of the last three vacancies that have occurred on my staff have been due to LPNs completing an RN program and advancing. They took RN jobs within the DOC, but at another facility. I have not had an RN opening in quite some time, and the last one was due to a retirement.
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    Quote from Orca
    I am a DON for the Department of Corrections in a western state. We don't have a lot of turnover. Two of the last three vacancies that have occurred on my staff have been due to LPNs completing an RN program and advancing. They took RN jobs within the DOC, but at another facility. I have not had an RN opening in quite some time, and the last one was due to a retirement.
    I am in Arizona, and I don't think there's a lot of turnover here either - I really don't see too many new openings, not anymore than anyone else really. Corrections facilities here in AZ are actually run by private corrections companies, so you would not be working for the state or the county, like you would be in many other states. It's all privatized here. I don't know if that's a good deal or a bad deal for nurses or not. You have to apply to the companies who have the contracts for running the prisons/jails, which I have done.


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