Not nursing related

  1. I've seen several posts here, where the nurses state that the staff can sometimes be harder to deal with that the inmates.

    My son recently had to serve two weeks in a county jail for an old DWI charge - in the year since this happened, he has been off the booze - but he still had to serve his time - and that's not the problem. He was guilty. He's a decent guy, but he screwed up, and all this has taught him an important lesson. We had been trying to tell him that he was an alcoholic, but he was in denial, said he could stop anytime. Well, after he was first picked up, and went into re-hab, he went thru a major withdrawal, and has been clean since.

    The problem was with the county jail - he said it was disgustingly filthy, and had mold on the walls - and he said each jailer had a separate set of rules, and he said some of them were real jacka##es.

    Now, I don't feel that being in jail should be a happy trip, but this place seems a little over the top. I finally had to call his lawyer, because they hadn't let him have clean clothes in over a week. I heard stories from many people who told me how nasty the place was.

    Is there some regulatory agency that oversees these places? It seems like they should have to maintain SOME levels of cleanliness.
    •  
  2. 27 Comments

  3. by   HOOSIERNW
    Quote from banditrn
    I've seen several posts here, where the nurses state that the staff can sometimes be harder to deal with that the inmates.

    My son recently had to serve two weeks in a county jail for an old DWI charge - in the year since this happened, he has been off the booze - but he still had to serve his time - and that's not the problem. He was guilty. He's a decent guy, but he screwed up, and all this has taught him an important lesson. We had been trying to tell him that he was an alcoholic, but he was in denial, said he could stop anytime. Well, after he was first picked up, and went into re-hab, he went thru a major withdrawal, and has been clean since.

    The problem was with the county jail - he said it was disgustingly filthy, and had mold on the walls - and he said each jailer had a separate set of rules, and he said some of them were real jacka##es.

    Now, I don't feel that being in jail should be a happy trip, but this place seems a little over the top. I finally had to call his lawyer, because they hadn't let him have clean clothes in over a week. I heard stories from many people who told me how nasty the place was.

    Is there some regulatory agency that oversees these places? It seems like they should have to maintain SOME levels of cleanliness.
    If you address this problem with the sherrif, and county officals, you might get an answer of 'budget problems' and 'staffing'. If the problem dosn't seem to improve, you can get ahold of the investigation section of your local newspapers and t.v.
  4. by   wtxcchp
    This can be a problem at times. It totally depends on who runs the jail and whether or not they are allowed to let their inmates work.

    Most of the prisons we contract with are pretty clean because they make the inmates clean it. However, depending on the location (mentality of the area), and the age of the jail, it can vary greatly.
  5. by   cowboylover
    There is an organization, American Correctional Association, that does accreditation on correctional facilities so that these type of things won't happen, (and they shouldn't). It is voluntary for the facility to apply for the accreditation.
  6. by   fiestynurse
    Unfortunately, some jails are filthy, although many have developed better cleaning practices because of highly publicized MRSA outbreaks. And it's not unusual for facilities to issue a clean set of clothes once a week at the minimum.

    You could have called the Public Health Department and complained. That might have triggered an inspection.

    In addition, there is usually some type of internal grievance process in most jails. Your son could have used this to request a clean set of clothes.

    Finally, I have to say that by listening to your son whine about his miserable time in jail (a situation that he created) and for you to call his lawyer is rather co-dependent and only further enabling your son. He is a grown man. I hope that you are attending Alanon meetings for family members of alcoholics.
  7. by   banditrn
    [QUOTE=fiestynurse;1940443]
    Finally, I have to say that by listening to your son whine about his miserable time in jail (a situation that he created) and for you to call his lawyer is rather co-dependent and only further enabling your son. He is a grown man. I hope that you are attending Alanon meetings for family members of alcoholics.[/QUOTE}

    You assume a lot by saying he was "whining" - he told me of the situation. As a nurse, I think mold and filth are health risks - and calling his lawyer was 'my' idea - the thought of wearing the same underwear for two weeks was disgusting to me!!

    Yes, my son is a grown man - and has been 'dry' for well over 1 and a half years. This was a stretched out thing - and if you'd read my posts you'd have known that! I personally have NO patience for alcoholics, as my son well knows - so please don't suggest that I need Alanon.
  8. by   Ion
    Quote from fiestynurse
    Finally, I have to say that by listening to your son whine about his miserable time in jail (a situation that he created) and for you to call his lawyer is rather co-dependent and only further enabling your son. He is a grown man. I hope that you are attending Alanon meetings for family members of alcoholics.
    Sounds like a learning experience for the young man and the family. The situation warrants further investigation, but keep in mind inmates may exaggerate the situation to win sympathy form their families.

    I believe facilities generally do their best to maintain themselves, but inmates enjoy destroying the place as fast as it can be repaired.

    If he was my boy I would have whooped him for going to jail and then whooped him again for complaining about it.
  9. by   augigi
    Quote from banditrn
    I personally have NO patience for alcoholics, as my son well knows - so please don't suggest that I need Alanon.
    Suggesting Alanon is not an insult. It's a support mechanism for relatives of alcoholics, and attending does not imply anything about the relatives' attitude to alcohol.
  10. by   banditrn
    I guess I didn't make myself clear in my original post - I was looking for advice on how or where to report a filthy, nasty, poorly run jail. This place is famous thruout not only the county, but other police agencies, etc., for being a bad place to go. The police in that particular town are also known for being some of the biggest jerks in the county - as a nurse, I have a lot of cop friends, and I've heard some real horror stories about the place and the jailors.

    My son was just 'reporting' to me what he saw. And, no, I don't feel that he's exaggerating.

    Just like bad LTCF's, hospitals, etc. I wanted to know if there was any kind of agency that oversaw things. His alcoholism is not the issue here.
  11. by   traumaRUs
    I too have a son who has been in the county jail - its a fairly nice place and although I believe in punishment, I do have to say that unsanitary conditions aren't to be tolerated either.

    We need to separate the mom and the nurse. The OP was a nurse wanting to know who to report unsanitary conditions. She wasn't saying that her son didn't deserve this.

    Believe me, you can never imagine the heartache that mothers like us go through with our children. It truly humbles you...I sincerely pray that you will never have to be in our shoes.
  12. by   banditrn
    Thanks Trauma - you got it!! The original posters didn't see fit to try to tell me how to raise my children - it's too late anyhow, I'm 57 yo, and my kids are all grown anyhow!

    I'm not very sympathetic to 'whining' as the one poster stated, but as a mother, the underwear thing had me going - as it turned out he got out that day anyhow. I guess I figure that 'you do the crime, you do the time'.

    But this particular place has such a bad reputation for being filthy, and treating inmates badly, and racism, which is driving me up the wall. It shouldn't be a cupcake to be there, but there should be minimum standards.

    As a mother, I never did let them use the old 'blame' game. And this boy knew that the only person that was responsible for his being there was HIM.

    Thanks again!
  13. by   **nurse**
    Amen.
  14. by   tirzo13
    i have various views on incarceration.
    in some ways its like day camp, otherwise it does really seem demeaning and barbaric.
    anyway, the officers treat the Inmates better than i was treated in basic training for the military.
    they are more polite than my drill seargents.
    anyway, a mothers phone call to the warden will go along way.
    wardens hate those calls, often the IM will often get the problem fixed when mother makes the call.
    I often tell IM's when something is taking too long, or they are not getting what they need, to simply have mother call the warden, and then boom, the warden will often make sure the problem is fixed.

close