Is it really as good as it sounds here? - page 3

I've been reading this forum this a. m. I am really impressed. You all seem so happy and up beat. I find this very encouraging. So encourging I'm wondering what it is I'm not hearing. I'm... Read More

  1. by   NancyRN
    "The bit" is just my personal opinion. Good to be able to express it here without being flamed.

    I found it offensive for the RN to screech "ANYONE HERE GOT ANY MEDICAL PROBLEMS?" in front of all onlookers. An inmate with a medical problem was expected to announce it and expose body parts in a hallway filled with people. That's a lack of privacy and it's against my Nurse Practice Act.

    I'm not so stupid as to expect a nurse to lock herself up with an inmate. Sheesh.
  2. by   Orca
    ...but you had no problem making a snap judgment about the professionalism and attitudes of the staff based upon a tour. I grant you, examinations should not be conducted out in the open (we have trauma rooms and exam rooms for such things).

    Because of the nature of the environment, there cannot be much privacy in a prison. It is a huge security risk. Openly-displayed compassion in a prison is an open invitation to manipulation. It may seem to be "against every tenet of nursing" to you, but sometimes doing the best thing in the patient's interest means saying "no".

    As I mentioned in an earlier thread, correctional nursing in many respects requires going against the grain of a lot of things we are taught in school and on the job. I would not contest for a minute that there are employees who are jaded and do not conduct themselves as they should. However, walk a mile in the other man's shoes before condemning him.
  3. by   sjoe
    "That's a lack of privacy and it's against my Nurse Practice Act."

    So you wrote your own NPA? Good for you. But spend 30 minutes in any ER or public health clinic, or in a multi-bed hospital ward, etc. and you will quickly learn how much this "privacy" you advocate exists in real life.


    "Because of the nature of the environment, there cannot be much privacy in a prison. It is a huge security risk. Openly-displayed compassion in a prison is an open invitation to manipulation. It may seem to be "against every tenet of nursing" to you, but sometimes doing the best thing in the patient's interest means saying "no". "

    Exactly right as usual, Orca. Sentiment, soft-heartedness, and wishful thinking have very limited utility in corrections (as well as in MANY other nursing environments where often the intentional infliction of pain, setting of stern limits, and "drill-instructor-type" communication are necessary).


    "I would not contest for a minute that there are employees who are jaded and do not conduct themselves as they should."

    Maybe even in an ER, ICU, surgery, rehab, or Med-surg unit? Naw, we know all those people are saints, while the sinners and mean people all work in corrections.
    Last edit by sjoe on Jan 11, '03
  4. by   Agnus
    Orca, and sjoe,

    You seem to be taking NancyRN's remarks about her observations in one prison on one tour personally. Her remarks did not sound like an attack to me. It seems they cut too close to the quick for you? You then both began to attack.

    The remaks were not about you or your facility. Your response to this make me wonder if one can work in this enviorment and still maintain objectivity.

    By the way I wonder why no one has attempted to address my latest question about whether I'd be eaten up or become too jaded. I hope the answer is not that I will become defensive and stike out everytime someone makes an honest observation or voice an honest oponion based on that observation. :stone

    I've read both your profiles after writing this. Very impressive. However.....? I am disappointed that with your credentials and field of expertise that this is what you offer? Please, say it aint so; instead that you just got off a particulary trying shift when you wrote your responses to NancyRN, and you were about to commit harriecarrie (spell) and she just was in the line of fire.
    Last edit by Agnus on Jan 11, '03
  5. by   psychonurse
    Okay correctional nursing isn't for all.....and unfortunately we have some bad seeds here just like in all other factors of nursing. In our state we are all accredited with the NCCHC which is like JAHO for hospitals and we have certain rules that we can not do...patient's rights and dignity are still supposed to be observed, we attempt to keep inmates diagnosis out of the general ears of everyone else but sometimes the inmates tell everyone what thier diagnosis is.

    I have no trouble putting my hand on a patients back or head in comfort and to sit with them when they are in pain, we can still be caring people for this clientele but we can't step over the line and you need to know what that line is. You must let inmates know that you care for them but only to a point. It is a very fine line to walk but you can do it cause I have for 13 years. There are days that I go home and feel very good at what I did and if I make a difference in a persons life than I am better that I was there.

    If you go to a system where the facilities are NCCHC accredidited I think you will see a difference in the way that the facility is run. We are not all "Nurse Rachet" but you do have to hold the line.
  6. by   sjoe
    NurseWeasel writes: "Games Criminals Play: How You Can Profit by Knowing Them
    by Bud Allen & Diana Bosta"

    Thanks a lot for this suggestion. It took me quite a while to find this book, wound up using Inter Library Loan, but it was worth it. Wish I had read it when I first started working corrections, and have subsequently suggested that its main ideas be incorporated into yearly staff training. Excellent stuff to know for anyone thinking about working in corrections, even as a volunteer.

    Basically the book describes the overall pattern of behaviors commonly used by inmates to manipulate staff. From initial, "harmless" behaviors and how they progress to more serious problems for all concerned IF the employee does not handle it appropriately from the very beginning. (It certainly showed why our facility had so much successful staff-splitting and peer-directed staff hostility, as well as the reasons behind some of the very negative threads and posts on this very forum.)
    Last edit by sjoe on Jan 22, '03
  7. by   Agnus
    Originally posted by sjoe
    NurseWeasel writes: "Games Criminals Play: How You Can Profit by Knowing Them
    by Bud Allen & Diana Bosta"

    It certainly showed why our facility had so much successful staff-splitting and peer-directed staff hostility, as well as the reasons behind some of the very negative threads and posts on this very forum.)
    Hmm. Sounds like a good book for nurses in any setting. Thanks.

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