Correctional Nurse / Officer

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    I am a nurse and correctional officer, I have to care for my patients and discipline them at the same time. I wonder if there are other nurses with that job-description and correctional officer's training.
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  3. 6 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    I haven't heard of any; seems like a conflict.
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    In california, there used to be positions statewide called MTAs. Not sure what the acronym stood for exactly but I know that they were LVNs that dispensed medications and gave medical care to the degree of an LVN's scope but they also wore the green uniform and had to attend the academy; they were well versed in correctional/disciplinary protocols and methods.

    In CA, once the receivership stepped in, they did away with MTAs for the very reason listen above, the position itself was contradictory to the goal of providing unbiased quality health care to inmates. The job itself sounds cool enough but I'd rather not participate in an officer's role to any extent, it distracts from a mission statement that focuses on providing care to an under served group. Just my opinion.
    Dpritche likes this.
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    In Nevada we once had employees called forensics, who were trained in both nursing and correctional custody. IMO there is too much conflict between the two roles and they ought not to be mixed. The classification was done away with several years ago.
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    MTA= Medical Technical Assistant :-)
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    Quote from TEMPNURSE
    I am a nurse and correctional officer, I have to care for my patients and discipline them at the same time. I wonder if there are other nurses with that job-description and correctional officer's training.
    Unless you are getting 2 paychecks, you shouldn't be working 2 different positions. Don't put yourself in such potential danger (legally). Choose one or the other and don't let the powers that be talk you into doing both.
  9. 0
    Quote from TEMPNURSE
    I am a nurse and correctional officer, I have to care for my patients and discipline them at the same time. I wonder if there are other nurses with that job-description and correctional officer's training.
    When you refer to being a nurse and correction officer are these both your job titles or are you referencing the fact that you must "discipline" your patients...
    Either way, as a Nurse who has worked in both Correctional and Forensic settings for almost 15 years, I found your choice in the use of the word "discipline" intriguing.

    I would suggest that the use of firm limit setting and clear boundaries with this particular population is required by all staff who work front line. If a patient or Inmate, regardless of the Clinical setting makes the choice to become aggressive (verbally or physically), or non compliant in any fashion, there are policies and procedures in place to ensure the safety and well being of both staff and patient/Inmate. In a correctional setting I may use my Therapeutic skills in an attempt to de escalate an inmate, if this doesn't work, a correctional officer may intervene. In a forensic setting I may also attempt to use my TR skills and if they fail... I may be required to, in a team approach use "use of force" as required and with in reason.

    In some institutions, namely Forensic settings, roles and functions of the Nurse can be different as there are no Correctional Officers. This means that Nurses and Health care workers are directly responsible and play a larger role in safety and security of the institution, patients and each other.

    At the end of the day, understanding the role of all disciplines within each hospital, institution and facility namely corrections and/or forensics is crucial so that you can make an informed decision as to whether or not you feel comfortable working there.


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