University Colorado Nurse Residency

  1. 0
    Just looking for information about this residency program. I know it's competitive but it seems that is all anyone can say about it.

    What is the starting pay?

    What is the commitment, if any?

    I have to go to class but ANY information is appreciated!
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  4. 18 Comments so far...

  5. 0
    I am only guessing, but I would guess starting pay is around $24ish?

    The program lasts a year. At the end, you have to do a big project. You also have regular classes you take throughout the year (once or twice a month, maybe?), in addition to working fulltime on your unit.
  6. 0
    According to the application, they ask for a two-year committment. The program is a year like klone said, and then they want another year to get a return on their investment. I have no idea how they hold you to it, though.
  7. 0
    I'm in it now. It is a 2 year commitment, with the official program lasting the entire first year. There is 2 weeks of orientation, then a ton of classes the first few month. Critical care has a 6 month preceptorship, Med/Surg 12 weeks. There is a financial penalty if you leave before 2 years. The amount depends on if you are critical care or Med/Surg. It deceases based on the number of hours you work, but only after your first year. Starting pay is going up from what I got for the next new grad class (lucky them), but its about the same as everywhere in Denver, as Klone said, "24ish".

    As far as the program goes: it is HIGHLY competitive. About 10% of applicants get hired (about 30 three times a year). In our class, over 1/2 were ACPs and/or did their senior practicum at UCH. If you want critical care, you have to have done a practicum or internship in an ICU (not necessarily theirs). Everyone graduated at the top of their classes. Also, you have to have a BSN.

    My personal opinion: They do an AMAZING job at orienting/guiding you through the new grad process. They are one of only 2 accredited Nurse Residency programs in the country. It is a teaching hospital so they do things right in that respect. They have spent a ton of time and money researching the best way to train new grads. I was a little bit concerned about it feeling like I was in school again (and at times, it does), but I don't have any of the "new grad shock" that I hear about from other new nurses. I also lucked out and got placed on a great floor. The hospital is at capacity pretty much constantly and we are building a whole new tower, so there is tons of opportunity for growth and advancement in the next few years. They definitely encourage further nursing education.

    Last I heard they are holding off on the August New Grad class because the hospital is switching to a new computer system in Sept., so we will be doing a class in Sept. and November - so you get 2 chances if you graduate in May! Good luck!
  8. 0
    I heard from someone who is currently an ACP that they get around 800 apps for 20 to 30 spots, and the spots either go to ACPs or out-of-state applicants with 4.0 GPAs. Obviously I have no way of verifying the accuracy of this, but if it's anywhere close to true, I wasted four hours applying.
  9. 0
    Def. not true- handful of non-acp in-state applicants were in my cohort (including myself). and I had a 3.9 not 4.0
  10. 0
    Quote from kasperas
    Def. not true- handful of non-acp in-state applicants were in my cohort (including myself). and I had a 3.9 not 4.0
    I'm in the 3.6 range, so that still doesn't encourage me, especially if there are only a "handful" of positions going to non-ACPs. I guess I should have figured that since they ask for a transcript that they put a heavy emphasis on GPA.

    I was actually offered an interview for the ACP last summer and I passed on it because they don't give you any notice on it. The August orientation was the one week after my semester ended and before my kids went back to school. I figured I would've heard something at least 3-4 weeks before then, and when I didn't we booked a family trip. I got an e-mail on a Thursday to interview the following Monday or Tuesday, which was just 2 weeks before orientation started. After going back and forth about it with my wife, I decided to skip the interview because we would have been out $1,000 if we cancelled the trip. It really rubbed me the wrong way that they did everything on such short notice.
    Last edit by Izzy11 on May 12, '11
  11. 0
    Do you know if ACPs are paid?



    Quote from kasperas
    I'm in it now. It is a 2 year commitment, with the official program lasting the entire first year. There is 2 weeks of orientation, then a ton of classes the first few month. Critical care has a 6 month preceptorship, Med/Surg 12 weeks. There is a financial penalty if you leave before 2 years. The amount depends on if you are critical care or Med/Surg. It deceases based on the number of hours you work, but only after your first year. Starting pay is going up from what I got for the next new grad class (lucky them), but its about the same as everywhere in Denver, as Klone said, "24ish".

    As far as the program goes: it is HIGHLY competitive. About 10% of applicants get hired (about 30 three times a year). In our class, over 1/2 were ACPs and/or did their senior practicum at UCH. If you want critical care, you have to have done a practicum or internship in an ICU (not necessarily theirs). Everyone graduated at the top of their classes. Also, you have to have a BSN.

    My personal opinion: They do an AMAZING job at orienting/guiding you through the new grad process. They are one of only 2 accredited Nurse Residency programs in the country. It is a teaching hospital so they do things right in that respect. They have spent a ton of time and money researching the best way to train new grads. I was a little bit concerned about it feeling like I was in school again (and at times, it does), but I don't have any of the "new grad shock" that I hear about from other new nurses. I also lucked out and got placed on a great floor. The hospital is at capacity pretty much constantly and we are building a whole new tower, so there is tons of opportunity for growth and advancement in the next few years. They definitely encourage further nursing education.

    Last I heard they are holding off on the August New Grad class because the hospital is switching to a new computer system in Sept., so we will be doing a class in Sept. and November - so you get 2 chances if you graduate in May! Good luck!
  12. 0
    yes, they are paid well, as compared to other hospitals CNAs and nurse interns.
  13. 0
    What is an ACP? Do most nurse residencies heavily weigh GPA? I feel like GPA is my only chance...I have a 4.0 but no preceptorship.


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