Is there a CO school WITHOUT a wait list? - page 2

HI Everybody, I was wondering if anyone has any information on any schools in Colorado that don't have a wait list of YEARS for admission. Does anyone know, is the state going to do anything soon... Read More

  1. by   SummitRN
    There are NO MULTI-YEAR WAITLISTS

    ... for any Colorado BSN program. They are all merit based admission: everyone applies, then the school takes the best applicants. If you don't get in, you reapply each cycle and try to make yourself one of the best. The "waitlist" is tiny and only for that semester in the event an accepted student declines.

    Many community colleges are moving to this model and several already have eliminated their waitlists and gone to merit based admissions. This change is because there are too many nursing schools in Colorado; new RN production up 50% over 10 years. There are not enough jobs for current graduates and not enough clinical spots for current students: today I saw 8 BSN students on a med surg floor at a hospital 230 miles from their school and this is normal. In an effort to stem the tide of several new schools opening each year, the state is requiring all programs become accredited or be shut down. Some programs are closing, others are going to merit based admissions to try and up the average caliber of their students.

    Regis & CU

    Regis is a non-profit and costs in the low 30s per year for their CHOICE and Traditional BSN programs. If a student has their prereqs done at CC, there is no 100K debt because the traditional program is only 4 semesters (20 months). Regis offers many scholarships and grant programs that can make their program cheaper than CU's 24 month program for the right student (even vs in-state at CU). Regis's 12 month accelerated program is 45k (which is cheaper than CU's 18 month accelerated program if you factor 1/2 year's pay).

    Regis is as selective as CU (and both of them have odds far worse than 1 in 6). Each school values slightly different qualities in their applicants.

    Both CU and Regis are excellent programs. Grads from both programs are in demand, the most desired grads in the Denver area. I don't know of any rankings to compare them. I will say this: the quality difference between the programs is not as great as the average range of quality in a given class of students. Both schools are top notch. I do know there are some major differences that make each program better for someone based on who they are as an individual.
    Last edit by SummitRN on Dec 2, '11
  2. by   SC_RNDude
    " hospitals generally do not care where you get your rn, and that other traits are much more important to hiring managers"

    --i agree. my hospital hires new grads from all the programs. however, they only hire new grads who have worked there as a tech, extern, or have done senior practicums on the unit for which they were hired. the school they went to isn't that important as it barely prepares you to be a nurse no matter which program you go to. they are looking more for those who have the traits and potential to be a great nurse, and that is why (for now) they only hire those new grads they know well.

    “i define best as the one program in the denver metro area whose graduates are in the highest demand and whose reputation among nursing employers and graduate nursing schools is strongest."

    --sorry, but no new graduates are “in demand”. when i was a new grad not too long ago calling nurse recruiters and managers, they seldom knew what program i graduated from before i got the “sorry, we’re not hiring new grads at this time.” i never tried saying “but i’m a xxx grad”, but i doubt that would made much difference.

    “these schools are ranked, you know!”

    --i for one didn’t know. i would love to see where my school is ranked. how do i find out? where are these rankings?
  3. by   hope3456
    A couple months ago it was mentioned that hospitals are giving BSN programs preference when it comes to doling out limited clinical rotation spots - over ADN programs. Does anyone know more about this?

    I find it interesting that people are still applying to nsg school in #'s where only 1 in 10 gets accepted...even with the waning demand and increased supply. Do these applicants realize what the employment situation really is?
  4. by   bunnynuts
    For those of you currently in the program or recent grads - what have you experienced about getting that first RN job? I keep hearing that hospitals don't want to hire RN's with less than a year experience. Is this reality? Is it easier to get a position in the hospitals you've done your clinicals in? Are there cities/states that have greater need? I'm currently weighing if the cost of the Accelerated Programs are going to be worth it if there are no jobs out there. Any advice is appreciated!
  5. by   One1
    Quote from bunnynuts
    For those of you currently in the program or recent grads - what have you experienced about getting that first RN job? I keep hearing that hospitals don't want to hire RN's with less than a year experience. Is this reality? Is it easier to get a position in the hospitals you've done your clinicals in? Are there cities/states that have greater need? I'm currently weighing if the cost of the Accelerated Programs are going to be worth it if there are no jobs out there. Any advice is appreciated!
    I graduated from an accelerated (BSN) program. Not all, but the majority of my cohort found jobs quickly, and many of them were hired by their senior practicum placement (department or at least hospital). In my opinion, a school with a "better reputation" pays off when it comes to clinical placements. Our placements were excellent, and placements in desirable facilities equals connections in desirable facilities for later job search. Also, some healthcare networks might show a preference for certain schools and their graduates. In the end, connections seem to matter very much, so use your clinicals to express your desire to work in that facility and to build connections and references. If you are already working in a facility in which you want to get transitioned to RN later than make sure that you let the educator in your department know and that you get your senior practicum there. In reality, senior practicum is a multiple-week long job interview.
  6. by   Nursedenver
    I know that Denver School of Nursing where I graduated doesn't have a waitlist because they start a cohort 4 times a year. I graduated last year and had no trouble securing my first job. I think when you graduate for any new career you have to be flexable with the first job you take. I'm on a med surg floor now but my ultimate goal is the ER. Just make sure you work hard at your clincal rotations to make a good impression, that's how I landed my first job. Good luck to everyone out their regardless of what school you attended!

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