Top 10 Reasons Against Unions - pg.11 | allnurses

Top 10 Reasons Against Unions - page 11

top ten reasons why we don't want a union 10. the union doesn't write my paycheck. 9. unions would rather cause problems than work together. 8. union scale means the best workers are... Read More

  1. Visit  amygarside profile page
    0
    10. the union doesn't write my paycheck.
    9. unions would rather cause problems than work together.
    8. union scale means the best workers are carrying the worst.
    7. the people who want a union really need one.
    6. too corrupt.
    5. too political, too liberal and too partisan.
    4. unions are only about power and money for the ones who run the union.
    3. unions are negative about everything but how great they are.
    2. i like to work steady.
    1. i've got too much self respect.

    true! however I think we need the help of the union sometimes.
  2. Visit  anothergrumpyoldRN profile page
    1
    why are we worried or concerned that some RNs may benefit from unions?
    Fiona59 likes this.
  3. Visit  amygarside profile page
    4
    nurses should benefit from unions IMHO
    HazelLPN, laborer, MassED, and 1 other like this.
  4. Visit  laborer profile page
    3
    HazelLPN, NurseNightOwl, and BrandonLPN like this.
  5. Visit  MrChicagoRN profile page
    1
    Wow. 14 pages over 3 years.

    Chicago is a big market, with lots of competition for quality clinicians. Most nurses aren't union here. Most Hospitals know that a nurse will vote with their feet if conditions are poor, and know they are in competition to create a positive work environment. Every place I've been in the past 23 years has had shared governance or some form of nursing council where nurses could speak for themselves.
    anothergrumpyoldRN likes this.
  6. Visit  laborer profile page
    1
    Last edit by laborer on Jul 24, '13
    BrandonLPN likes this.
  7. Visit  BrandonLPN profile page
    7
    Quote from MrChicagoRN
    Wow. 14 pages over 3 years.

    Chicago is a big market, with lots of competition for quality clinicians. Most nurses aren't union here. Most Hospitals know that a nurse will vote with their feet if conditions are poor, and know they are in competition to create a positive work environment. Every place I've been in the past 23 years has had shared governance or some form of nursing council where nurses could speak for themselves.
    It's hard to "vote with your feet" when the economy's as bad as it is.

    "Shared governance" is a joke. It's frilly, foo-foo window dressing, just like "nurse appreciation week" or the dumb little trinkets they give us on our employment anniversary.
  8. Visit  MassED profile page
    3
    Just some information, so that others who read this can view what a union can do. I have been on both sides of this as a nurse and I have to tell you, it's nice to know you've got someone on your side (think separation of church vs. state) should you need it. A hospital will look out for themselves, ultimately. If it's them or you, who do you think they will back up? This is not to say there is any perfect solution, but knowing that you have someone to go to about your nursing ratio/patient care that is separate from budget and bottom line concerns really is the only way. How can you expect any reasonable assistance for nurses when a company is concerned about a business where the more patients and services means more money. That is a direct conflict to me. Management is business. Nurses are concerned for patients. We need someone to look out for us and not let budgetary concerns be the primary focus with a business.

    Take a peek at some of the things below that a union CAN do. If you compare this to what you have in a non union hospital, this would be AWESOME to have.

    RN Compensation


    • Salaries: salaries up to $85.15/hr for career RNs
    • New graduate rates up to $51.73/hr for day shift.
    • Shift differential: *12 percent for evenings, 20.5 percent for night shifts.
    • Paid education leave: up to 12 days per year.
    • 13 paid holidays per year.
    • Preceptor pay: $2.50/hr for preceptor assignments.
    • Charge pay: $3.25/hr additional pay.
    • Weekend differentials: 30 percent additional pay.
    • Call back while on-call: double-time.
    • Per diem pay: 25 percent pay differential.
    • Overtime: time-and-a-half after eight hours, double-time after 12 hours.
    • Experience credit: increased pay for years worked as an RN inside or outside the U.S.

    Defined-Benefit Pension Plan


    • Full and part-time RNs receive defined-benefit plan.
    • Pension credit for per diems who work 1,000 hours per year.
    • RNs who transfer to another CNA/NNU*****-represented hospital in a system are able to bring full earned pension credits.

    Health Benefits

    Full coverage for the RN and her/his family, including health, dental, and vision, paid by the employer with no co-pays.
    Scheduling


    • No cancellation: RNs cannot be cancelled from a regularly-assigned shift.
    • Preference over travelers: Regularly-scheduled RNs have preference over travelers in scheduling and cannot be floated from their unit if a traveler is there.

    Longevity Incentives


    • No mandatory weekends after 20 years of service.
    • Longevity raises at 9, 11, 16, 20, 25, and 30 years.
    • Five weeks of vacation after 10 years.
    • Increased monthly pension.
    • 15 days per year sick leave after five years.
  9. Visit  anothergrumpyoldRN profile page
    2
    It seems that those are all positive things.
    I still wonder why some are so disturbed by the notion of nurses benefiting from a union?
    Perhaps I am not appreciating some nuance here...
    could someone help me out?
    No Stars In My Eyes and MassED like this.
  10. Visit  MassED profile page
    6
    Anothergrump,

    I have had someone tell me "look what happened to Detroit." Well, drugs happened to Detroit. American automakers moving out is also what happened to Detroit. One can't say it was the autoworker's unionizing. Please.

    Honestly, I can see nothing wrong with nurses wanting someone else to look out for them, rather than their employers best interest (which is their bottom line). That translates to budget, not patient ANYTHING. We all know the song and dance that is fed to us, but it's all just politically correct stuff. Healthcare is a business. A BIG business and someone needs to look out for those of us that are in harms way EVERY day. Police have unions. Teachers have unions. Why can't nurses? Like it's somehow expected that we are martyrs for our calling? That we shouldn't complain when safety is our utmost priority? We should just deal with it? Everything in our world is political, including healthcare and business. It's a fact. Why shouldn't we explore each option and organize nurses to improve our careers? Remember how horrible the nursing ratios were years ago and California really brought that to the forefront? I can't remember the name of the hospital at the moment, but it was groundbreaking news. They changed nursing culture.
  11. Visit  Meeh619 profile page
    7
    My husband was a welder in California, he was getting cheated for time he was at work. Like mandatory breaks or clocking out late but no overtime. Someone brought it up to management but nothing was done. We moved to Texas & 4 yrs after the fact my husband got checks every 3 months for a yr & a half. The union got every single worker the pay they deserved. Bonus: my husband wasn't even in the union. He got less money then those that paid dues but still they got taken care of. & I bet this company learned to give these guys their breaks & pay them as they promised. Companies don't care about you or your fanily, your just another replaceable worker. You need someone to be the bigger voice!! These big companies have a big voice why can't we!!
  12. Visit  herring_RN profile page
    3
    =MrChicagoRN;7445821]Wow. 14 pages over 3 years.

    Chicago is a big market, with lots of competition for quality clinicians. Most nurses aren't union here. Most Hospitals know that a nurse will vote with their feet if conditions are poor, and know they are in competition to create a positive work environment. Every place I've been in the past 23 years has had shared governance or some form of nursing council where nurses could speak for themselves.
    University of Chicago Hospital RNs are union members. In 2011 about 1,300 UCMC RNs were union members.

    Cook County hospital, clinics, public health and correctional RNs are union members. In 2005 there were about 1,800 union RNs employed at Cook County.

    Jackson Park RNs recently achieved their first union contract with improved staffing grids for every hospital unit that can not be changed without the agreement of both management and the bedside nurses, increased staffing as needed based on individual patient illness, and two extra RNs on each shift as a "float pool" to assure safer staffing.

    Other significant patient care gains include limits on the assignment of nurses to clinical areas outside their specialty expertise, safe patient handling provisions with special lift equipment for patients to stem patient falls and accidents and worker injuries, and a Professional Performance Committee of staff nurses, elected by their colleagues, to meet with management to address patient care issues. Jackson Park Hospital employs about 140 RNs.

    I quoted inaccurate numbers in error.
    They are deleted, but can be seen below.

    Last edit by herring_RN on Jul 28, '13 : Reason: Explain error
    HazelLPN, lindarn, and laborer like this.
  13. Visit  MrChicagoRN profile page
    0
    Quote from herring_RN

    The number of patient-care RNs in Illinois is 6,020
    http://nursing.illinois.gov/ResearchData.asp

    University of Chicago Hospital RNs are union members. In 2011 about 1,300 UCMC RNs were union members.

    Cook County hospital, clinics, public health and correctional RNs are union members. In 2005 there were about 1,800 union RNs employed at Cook County.

    Jackson Park RNs recently achieved their first union contract with improved staffing grids for every hospital unit that can not be changed without the agreement of both management and the bedside nurses, increased staffing as needed based on individual patient illness, and two extra RNs on each shift as a “float pool” to assure safer staffing.
    Other significant patient care gains include limits on the assignment of nurses to clinical areas outside their specialty expertise, safe patient handling provisions with special lift equipment for patients to stem patient falls and accidents and worker injuries, and a Professional Performance Committee of staff nurses, elected by their colleagues, to meet with management to address patient care issues. Jackson Park Hospital employs about 140 RNs.

    Those three hospitals employ a total of 3,240 union registered nurses. This is more than half of the direct care RNs in the state.
    I couldn't find that figure in your link
    Illinois RN and LPN. Around 138000. http://www.bls.gov/ro5/oesilnur.pdf

    Openings per year. 6145 (RN). http://nursing.illinois.gov/PDF/2011...INAL%20(2).pdf

    3240 Unionized RN is a small percentage
    Last edit by MrChicagoRN on Jul 27, '13


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