Sympathy strike...would you do it?? - page 3

by notachargenurse 11,009 Views | 66 Comments

I belong to a very strong union who is very opinionated. I don't always agree with their stance on things. There is another union who is striking for possible benefit take-aways...I don't know the true details of what is being... Read More


  1. 1
    Quote from Futterwacken
    First they came for the communists, and I didn't speak out because I wasn't a communist.
    Then they came for the trade unionists, and I didn't speak out because I wasn't a trade unionist.
    Then they came for the Jews, and I didn't speak out because I wasn't a Jew.
    Then they came for me and there was no one left to speak out for me.
    powerful
    mo2rn likes this.
  2. 0
    first it depends on the legality of 'sympathy strikes' and associated activities including secondary and 'flying' pickets - some places make these illegal and secondary action leaves you wide open to action by your own employer and even the involvement of the security services and the bandying about of terms like 'domestic terrorist'

    second if sympathy actions are legal where you are , surely your union should vote on whether to strike -same as if you were striking for a 'primary' reason ...
  3. 4
    If I had the day off, I would consider standing with the strikers. If I felt the company in question were being unfair, I would not use their services or product. I would not screw my current employer, co-workers, and patients by not showing up if I were scheduled that day.

    Your union's job is to obtain & enforce a contract that protects your rights in exchange for your union dues. They've done their job by getting a decent contract, you do your part by paying dues. Your employer expects that by agreeing to certain concessions, they should in return have workers that show up when scheduled.

    If the hospital has done their part and follows the contract and they still feel that they may have to deal with employees not showing up due to a strike, I doubt your next labor agreement will be so cushy.
    RHC81, kids, mystory, and 1 other like this.
  4. 3
    Quote from caroladybelle
    Only a post or two in and someone kicks in the Godwin's law effect.

    I believe that there is more than a bit of difference between Nazi genocide and a sympathy strike. I suspect that the families of the 9 million murdered would agree.
    As one of those families I am going to thank you for saying this.
    RHC81, herring_RN, and OCNRN63 like this.
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    ***ot alert***ot alert***ot alert***

    Quote from caroladybelle
    only a post or two in and someone kicks in the godwin's law effect.

    i believe that there is more than a bit of difference between nazi genocide and a sympathy strike. i suspect that the families of the 9 million murdered would agree.
    Quote from xtxrn
    thank you
    Quote from mazy
    as one of those families i am going to thank you for saying this.
    Quote from heron
    it may follow godwin's law, but in this case it's legit ... and that's not trivializng the holocaust in any way.
    there's no denying the reality and the profound evil of the holocaust. there's also no denying the truth of another cliche: those who refuse to learn from history are doomed to repeat it.

    the creation of scapegoats and the abandonment of the "other" to preserve one's own security were two of the root causes of that atrocity ... and no one can tell me that those dynamics aren't at work in the world now.

    the point of the quotation that offended some posters is that, if you are not willing to support another's struggle, don't look for support for yours ... because, depend on it, your time will come.
    nicurn001, mo2rn, Futterwacken, and 1 other like this.
  6. 1
    Quote from notachargenurse
    What would you do? I am thankful I have a job in this economy!
    I also belong to a very strong union with an excellent contract and have some of the same issues you do with my union. A sympathy strike like you mention would definitely violate my union's contract and to my knowledge, they never ask anyone to do something like this.

    If my union votes to go on strike, I go on strike. Support your colleagues all you can, but I'm not going on any ad-hoc strike. Ever.
    Not_A_Hat_Person likes this.
  7. 1
    Quote from heron
    ***ot alert***ot alert***ot alert***









    there's no denying the reality and the profound evil of the holocaust. there's also no denying the truth of another cliche: those who refuse to learn from history are doomed to repeat it.

    the creation of scapegoats and the abandonment of the "other" to preserve one's own security were two of the root causes of that atrocity ... and no one can tell me that those dynamics aren't at work in the world now.

    the point of the quotation that offended some posters is that, if you are not willing to support another's struggle, don't look for support for yours ... because, depend on it, your time will come.
    we're going to end up going way off here and probably need to reel it in, but the creation of scapegoats and abandonment of the "other" were tangential effects of a policy of eugenics, which was a system that promoted the idea of an ideal race, the creation of which would necessitate the extermination of "sub-groups" of individuals whose existence was deemed to be a detriment to the future of humanity. the worst thing about the holocaust was not just that it stemmed from hatred of the other, but that the engine that drove it was fueled on a cold, calculated sense of expediency.

    if you are not willing to support another person's struggle, yes you will also have to pay the consequences and i agree with you 100% in that, which is why i am a union member and support union activities. however, keep in mind that whatever happens in the employment sector, we nurses are not going to be hauled off to the gas chambers in droves until there is no trace of us left on this planet.

    so keep your arguments on topic and on track, the only thing you accomplish by playing into this whole godwin theory is that the people who might agree with you are just going to get ****** off, roll their eyes, and dismiss you as someone who is so devoid of relevant ideas and strategies to defend your ideals, that you have ot go all the way back to the worst and most extreme moment of history to make your point.

    end rant and over.
    RHC81 likes this.
  8. 0
    Quote from mazy
    The worst thing about the holocaust was not just that it stemmed from hatred of the other, but that the engine that drove it was fueled on a cold, calculated sense of expediency.
    And this is different from contemporary corporate behavior how? Especially in the area of labor relations...
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    The difference is with one, you will have poorer working conditions, and less benefits ...your employer is still not going to be able to separate you by race, strip you naked, assault your children, perform brutal medical experiments on you, knock your teeth out tonscavenge the gold, strip you naked, shave off your hair, tattoo a number on you, and gas/stab/behead/shoot you to death.

    You have a choice, work there or leave. In the holocaust there was no such choice.

    The point of Godwin's law is that overwrought people using hyperboly to describe a much less detrimental issue invariably drive away many who might support their cause. I have always supported strikes and refused to work as a strikebreaker. But referencing a wellknown saying clearly referencing mass genocide and comparing it to a possible decrease in benefits.......reflects very poorly on the writer.

    Much like those who scream that requiring discussion of advance directives, is DEATH PANELS, and that hospice is there to give little black pills to kill your loved one, or permitting civil unions will destroy marriage as we know it, it diminishes the poster in our eyes, and pushes us to disregard any of your messages, valid or know.

    And bluntly, there are plenty of great analogies out there that are not over the top, that would be more likely to bring more supporters into your fold.
    RHC81, Altra, MrChicagoRN, and 1 other like this.
  10. 0
    Quote from rnmi2004
    If I had the day off, I would consider standing with the strikers. If I felt the company in question were being unfair, I would not use their services or product. I would not screw my current employer, co-workers, and patients by not showing up if I were scheduled that day.

    Your union's job is to obtain & enforce a contract that protects your rights in exchange for your union dues. They've done their job by getting a decent contract, you do your part by paying dues. Your employer expects that by agreeing to certain concessions, they should in return have workers that show up when scheduled.

    If the hospital has done their part and follows the contract and they still feel that they may have to deal with employees not showing up due to a strike, I doubt your next labor agreement will be so cushy.
    I totally agree. I am also going to ask the union to have us vote on it! It was not up for a vote. Our union does whatever they want with very little input, in my opinion. I am scheduled to work that day, and I feel obligated to do so. But I am worried about how I will be treated by my co-workers if I cross the line.


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