Survey: Would you cross a picket line when RNs were striking? - page 8

This months survey question: Would you cross a picket line when RNs were striking (at your own hospital or another)? Yes or No? FYI: Here are the results from this survey: Q: Would you... Read More

  1. by   psnurse
    Originally posted by fergus51


    .....the almighty dollar is more important to both than the conditions at other hospitals or the reasons why other nurses are striking. If they care did they wouldn't undermine the efforts to improve conditions.......

    Unfortunately it it never cheaper for the hospital to settle with their own nurses. (Case in point: Our government would rather have a system that is based on OT (where we get paid double) than give us a decent wage to begin with ......

    We can not all strike because every hospital in the province is staffed by the same union and foreign nurses can not flood in because a nurse has to be a member of the union to work here.

    .........we need better conditions and better wages ........

    If nurses were as united in the US as they are here in Canada .......
    The only condition you complained about was overtime. But several references were made to your wage. Now tell me that striking isn't about the money. It IS about the money and that is perfectly OK. It seems you have disdain for the "almighty dollar" that you desire and is necessary to make those other improvements in conditions that you alluded to, when someone else is getting it. Why do you care who gets it? In the end, it will always be more cost effective to bring you back into the fold than to continue to pay strikebreaking salary indefinitely.

    I am glad to hear the Canadian public is more supportive than the US. But if the whole union doesn't strike, it isn't really a strike as much as an inconvenience. If local #xyz goes on strike, they all go. Not just the ones working on project abc.

    With regard to overtime, I am happy to report that in my state no nurse can be charged with patient abandonment for refusing mandatory overtime. The Board of Nursing recently released this opinion. The state attorney general lent support with a concurring opinion. All that and no union, no strike. hmmmm....

    Living not far from the Canadian border myself, I can't understand why those "united" Canadian nurses are driving three hours to work side by side with me. I wonder how many of them would drive the same distance for strikebreaker pay.
  2. by   fergus51
    Originally posted by psnurse


    The only condition you complained about was overtime. But several references were made to your wage. Now tell me that striking isn't about the money. It IS about the money and that is perfectly OK. It seems you have disdain for the "almighty dollar" that you desire and is necessary to make those other improvements in conditions that you alluded to, when someone else is getting it. Why do you care who gets it? In the end, it will always be more cost effective to bring you back into the fold than to continue to pay strikebreaking salary indefinitely.

    I am glad to hear the Canadian public is more supportive than the US. But if the whole union doesn't strike, it isn't really a strike as much as an inconvenience. If local #xyz goes on strike, they all go. Not just the ones working on project abc.

    With regard to overtime, I am happy to report that in my state no nurse can be charged with patient abandonment for refusing mandatory overtime. The Board of Nursing recently released this opinion. The state attorney general lent support with a concurring opinion. All that and no union, no strike. hmmmm....

    Living not far from the Canadian border myself, I can't understand why those "united" Canadian nurses are driving three hours to work side by side with me. I wonder how many of them would drive the same distance for strikebreaker pay.
    My disdain for the almighty dollar is really for those who love it so much that they would betray their colleagues to get it. I firmly believe that strikebreakers feel no moral obligation to their colleagues. If screwing other nurses will get them money, that's just fine with them and I just don't think that it is fine. I think we shouldn't have to get ahead by stepping on the people in front of us.

    Wage is one of my primary concerns for exactly the reason you mentioned: we lose nurses to the better paying jobs in the US every year when we are desperately short of nurses at home. Without a good wage we lose nurses and have to rely on OT (which isn't mandatory) to care for patients. The fact that thousands of surgeries have been cancelled simply because we aren't coming in to work on our days off should show people that our system is run on OT done only because we care about our patients (AND OT has been worked during this ban because it is necessary even to cover just the emergency cases). This should show anyone that our system is in crisis.

    I also have the right to refuse OT, but I often work more than I want because there is no one else to do it and if I don't my patients will suffer. Another way of putting it: Wages are only important to me because they guaratee better conditions, including less OT. If I were only in it for the money I would move back to the States, believe me. So don't tell me what I'd be striking for. You have no idea.

    ps
    If you're interested in the other conditions I am upset about I'd be glad to enlighten you. I talk mostly about OT because I am getting burned out fast, and I am tired of it. And when I talk about the unity of nurses here, I am talking about the nurses here. Not the ones who work in the US. The nurses here voted 97% together. Oh and as for the union crack, I could care less whether nurses are unionized, I care if nurses have UNITY.
  3. by   fergus51
    Oh and psnurse, I care about who gets the money because the ridiculous amount of money wasted on strike breaker's wages is money that could have been used to improve working conditions at the hospitals. It is absolutely stupid to me.
  4. by   RNPD
    "With regard to overtime, I am happy to report that in my state no nurse can be charged with patient abandonment for refusing mandatory overtime. The Board of Nursing recently released this opinion. The state attorney general lent support with a concurring opinion. All that and no union, no strike. hmmmm...."

    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

    That may be but see where your BON and State AG are when you get FIRED for refusing mandatory OT. You may keep your license but you will be looking for another job-and that is not only unfair, but also detrimental to possible future employment. Many state BONs have released statements to the effect that refusal of OT does not constitute patient abandonment. But they go on to say that this is no guarantee that you will remain employed. That is what UNIONS are for!
  5. by   bugladyrn
    Question. Have any of you thought about the possibility that a member of your family may need services at the hospital that is on strike? Or, what kind of burden you are putting on the other nurses at the hospitals where they sent the patients you abandoned? Whatever happened to being the patient advocate? If you look back on the history of nursing it has always been difficult, but I cannot recall one nurse walking away from her patients and proving her point, or making a difference. The nurse who makes a difference is the one who stays and cares for the patient who really needs her\him. While showing the administration the problems and needs of nursing, bring with you a resolution and black and white proof that it works.
  6. by   bugladyrn
    Question. Have any of you thought about the possibility that a member of your family may need services at the hospital that is on strike? Or, what kind of burden you are putting on the other nurses at the hospitals where they sent the patients you abandoned? Whatever happened to being the patient advocate? If you look back on the history of nursing it has always been difficult, but I cannot recall one nurse walking away from her patients and proving her point, or making a difference. The nurse who makes a difference is the one who stays and cares for the patient who really needs her\him. While showing the administration the problems and needs of nursing, bring with you a resolution and black and white proof that it works. As for crossing the picket line I'm not sure, but I know i'd want any kind of nurse around if my family member needed immediate care. I believe there are other ways of creating change.
  7. by   fergus51
    Originally posted by bugladyrn
    Question. Have any of you thought about the possibility that a member of your family may need services at the hospital that is on strike? Or, what kind of burden you are putting on the other nurses at the hospitals where they sent the patients you abandoned? Whatever happened to being the patient advocate? If you look back on the history of nursing it has always been difficult, but I cannot recall one nurse walking away from her patients and proving her point, or making a difference. The nurse who makes a difference is the one who stays and cares for the patient who really needs her\him. While showing the administration the problems and needs of nursing, bring with you a resolution and black and white proof that it works. As for crossing the picket line I'm not sure, but I know i'd want any kind of nurse around if my family member needed immediate care. I believe there are other ways of creating change.
    I understand why you wouldn't want to leave your patients or have them transfered. The problem is we eventually get to the point when all that is left is a strike. And strikes have achieved their goals here before. If I have to decide whether or not I would strike (which is a distinct possibility in the next few months) it would be because I am a patient advocate. Essential services can be covered during a strike. BUT, in the near future it is not going to be possible to cover them if we continue to lose nurses to the US and other professions. That's why I think a strike can actually benefit patients in the long run. The alternative is to take a crap contract and watch the shortage get even worse than it already is until there aren't enough nurses to provide even basic nusing care.
  8. by   tiger
    no. i would not cross the picket line.if we want fair pay for our work we should stick together. those of you who would----- you. j
  9. by   fergus51
    OK, our union has decreased its salary demands to 35$ for top paid nurses (about 23$US) when the government's last offer was 32.40$. They still want the gov't to remove the BS concessions they want us to take (no designated days off for part-timers and calling in of casuals to no longer be based on seniority) and have a 2 year contract instead of a 3 year contract. Is this completely unreasonable? I think nurses are being very reasonable however the employers have just flatly refused to up their wage offer and just keep telling nurses we should accept their original offer (which 96% of us voted to reject in the first place). I am sick of this BS. So, for all those nurses who say there are other ways of achieveing what we want I ask you:WHAT ARE THEY? Please enlighten me.
  10. by   pickledpepperRN
    [QUOTE]Originally posted by -jt
    [B]
    Originally posted by spacenurse:
    Dear SoCalRN,
    If you ever have to wrap a young man in a body bag after he bled to death after elective surgery because the RNs were replaced by untrained people you will know that carrying a sign may be a more professional alternative........

    and where is the public outcry against this situation being created in the first place? Why isnt the public screaming about their safety being compromised in the hospitals while management practices designed to maintain the profit margin push the profession of nursing into extinction? why is it that the RNs are blamed by the hospital & media & OTHER RNs for that pts death, but no one seems to hold the hospital responsible for putting their profits before their pts?

    Check the 'NEWS' section. Hospitals are now required to inform patients if their care caused injury.
    We can (and I think should) report "Sentinel Events" to the JCAHO. They will investigate and "help" the hospital prevent the event from happening again.
    Hopefully the JCAHO will check that the patient/family was informed.
  11. by   SusieQ1243
    I'm new to this board but I wanted to say that my sister is a BSN (I'm an LPN) and over the weekend she told me that during the Minnesota strike she was told she could make $4000 a WEEK to fill in! Makes you wonder... they suddenly have the funds to meet the crisis but while the nurses are bent over and taking it, that's "just the best we can do".
  12. by   montroyal
    I have worked in the medical field for 21 years, the last 9 as an RN. When I began my nursing career, I was full of fire and the need for as much knowledge as I could find. My fellow nurse have managed not only to estingush this fire but have also destroyed my pride in being a nurse. The surveyed you conducted showed almost four of every ten nurses were willing to stab their fellow nurses in the back. I have watched nurses accept unsafe assignments, unsafe working conditions and deplorable treatment. Their only response was backroom crumbling. Because of this, I stopped working for hospitals three years ago and started agency nursing. I make the rules and pick the assignments. I will work at a hospital that recognizes the need for help, but I will never cross a picket line or accept an assignment which uses agency nurses to contain or control their staff. Why would any nurse contribute to the destruction of the nursing profession. It is time for nurses to recognize the need for us to bring professionalism back to nursing, but I just don't see this happening. All you backroom grumblers and " I don't want to make waves" pseudo professional better take a good look around you and assess your working conditions. Why are all the expereinced nurses leaving the hospital in droves. Why are the bedside nurses no longer seeking professional certifications in their choosen fields. Whats the expeirence level of your coworkers. Whats your units turn over rate. If the answers to these quetions aren't pleasant, its time to take a stand and help yourself, other nurses and your patients.
  13. by   Hardknox
    No--I would never cross a picket line. As far as your family member needing care in a hospital whose nurses are on strike, The BOSTON GLOBE reported this week that a pay stub from a scab nurse was found on a copy machine at Brockton Hospital. She/He worked 84 hours and was paid $4,500.00. That's a safe nurse? You'd want that nurse taking care of you??? And this is a hospital that is refusing to even sit down with it's nurses after 50+ days of a strike!
    Please tell me this person with her big paycheck is only in it because she cares so deeply about patient care.

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