Survey: Would you cross a picket line when RNs were striking? - page 6

This months survey question: Would you cross a picket line when RNs were striking (at your own hospital or another)? Yes or No? FYI: Here are the results from this survey: Q: Would you... Read More

  1. by   journeyy
    I find it interesting that Canadian nurses are able to strike without risk to the patient. They don't make beds, do secretarial work, etc. Administration has to step in and do all the work the nurses aren't doing. Perhaps a Canadian nurse could expand on this, it sure seems to work. I would never cross a picket line.
  2. by   undoneRN
    Originally posted by shodobe:
    No problem. Someone has to take care of the patients left behind. Does the striking nurses think the patient's family will come in and care for them?I think not.Now if this was a bunch of striking truckers and there was a chance I might get my butt kicked, I might think twice. There has not been a nurse yet that scared me. I can take care of myself and the patients they leave behind.
    I feel pitty for you. Look at what you just printed. There is something there that scares me You are hiding behind the veil of self-sacrificing, being the noble martyr. Your ideas are in the right place, but your approach is not. Are you the unit bully? I think so.
  3. by   -jt
    [QUOTE]Originally posted by undoneRN:
    [B] [QUOTE] Does the striking nurses think the patient's family will come in and care for them? [Q]

    No...there would be no need to. If the hospital couldnt get scabs to keep business afloat while it ignored the conditions that caused its own nurses to walk out,it would have no choice but to negotiate fairly with its own nurses & the strike would never happen. So the regular nurses would be there to take care of the pts themselves. The fact that the availability of scabs helps to provoke & prolong a nurses strike is a little detail that scabs refuse to recognize. If there were no scabs, there would be no nurses strike. If the hospital insisted on provoking a strike when it could not get scabs, it would have to shut down. Rather than shut down, it would choose to work it out with its own nurses & the strike would be called off. I have experienced that situation first hand. No scabs available??? Guess what! The hospital suddenly becomes more willing to negotiate & compromise & the strike is averted. Simple.

  4. by   -jt
    Originally posted by journeyy:
    I find it interesting that Canadian nurses are able to strike without risk to the patient. They don't make beds, do secretarial work, etc. Administration has to step in and do all the work the nurses aren't doing. Perhaps a Canadian nurse could expand on this, it sure seems to work. I would never cross a picket line.

    Its not just Canada. We are ALL able to do that. The difference is when the nurses stand together. You dont find nurse scabs crossing nurse strike lines in Canada. THATS the difference.
  5. by   TopazStone
    I had the bad luck of starting my first nursing job a few months prior to a strike. My co-workers all understood that if I were on probation, I'd have to cross the line. I was a week past probation when the strike took place. This was at a community health center-- we warned the patients that a strike would take place and the more severe patients were seen the day before (this was a one day strike to make a point). I went out to support the people who had been there for years and were going to lose benefits and pay increases. Everything worked out and was quickly settled. The best part of the story is the SCAB that replaced me had diabetes, went without eating, passed out and had to go home!!! And she was caring for my patients!!!!
  6. by   Louie18
    " I have never regretted setting a precedent that would enhance the integrity of organized labor."
    Louie DuLac RN
  7. by   ornurse2001
    Originally posted by PDRN:
    To CVSDNurse~~~trust me-DO NOT bring "coffee and donuts" to your co-workers as you cross the picket line to go to work. You'll be lucky if anyone SPEAKS to you after the strike-no matter how compelling you think your reasons for crossing are. Everyone must do what they feel is right-but no one will appreciate the gesture and most will be angered by it.
    THIS TYPE OF RESPONSE IS EXACTLY WHAT GIVES UNIONS A BAD WRAP.SCARE TACTICS ARE NOT WHY NURSES OR ANYONE ELSE SHOULD RECONSIDER CROSSING PICKET LINES, BUT RATHER THE ISSUES BEING CONSIDERED FOR ARGUMENT.I AM NOT A UNION MEMBER AND NEVER HAVE BEEN, BUT THIS TYPE OF MENTALITIY IS WHAT MAKES ME LEARY ABOUT BEING INVOLVED IN ONE.


  8. by   Chuckie
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    Last edit by Chuckie on Jan 18, '03
  9. by   susanmary
    The ONLY way I would cross a picket line when RNs were striking would be if one of my family members were in the hospital. I would be at their bedside to help/support them. Other than that, NO I would not cross a picket line.
  10. by   journeyy
    Don't most nursing strikes involve issues that affect patient care? Such as: mandatory overtime, ratios, etc. Resolution of these issues enable nurses to provide more effective care. Work slowdown - no paperwork, bedmaking, etc., can be a powerful bargaining tool that doesn't directly affect patient care. Essential patient services can still be provided. In the end, united we stand, divided we fail. Can you imagine the power we would have, by sheer numbers alone, if ALL nurses could agree on some basic standards? How much lobbying power would nurses in the US have if ALL US nurses stood together? You'd better believe we would be heard. The breakdown from federal to state to local to facility merely weakens everyone's position.
  11. by   mustangsheba
    I wanted to clarify my last post. Just wanted to say that I feel striking is necessary. It's the PICKETING I have a problem with. Part of that is seeing picket lines degenerate into a fracas. I repeat, I feel that we nurses would make a strong, powerful statement if we would all just stay home for one day. Let management know for instance, that next Tuesday there will not be one nurse reporting for work ANYWHERE. Imagine and pretend. Picture the empty hospital corridors. The coffers not being filled because there are no nurses doing what nurses do to make it possible for hospitals to function safely. The doctors would actually have to do patient care. Administration would have to roll up its sleeves, put on gloves that they may be allergic to, serve lousey food, clean up who knows what, try to do five different things at once. Or maybe they wouldn't because they don't know how. I can't imagine the dollar number this would effect. Just pretend. Okay, I'm folding up my soapbox.
  12. by   fiestynurse
    With a huge nursing strike looming on the horizon in Minnesota, I thought this was worth reposting.
  13. by   RN2Bn2003
    yes I would cross in a heart beat. I do not have the luxury of being able to go without a pay check. My hubby and I have worked very hard for what we have and I am not about to lose it all to pound the pavement for a few dollars more. Think what you will and call me what you want but my family comes first not your cause

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