Survey: Would you cross a picket line when RNs were striking? - page 5

This months survey question: Would you cross a picket line when RNs were striking (at your own hospital or another)? Yes or No? FYI: Here are the results from this survey: Q: Would you... Read More

  1. by   -jt
    Originally posted by Brenda Braun:
    [B] > a bit hypocritical, yes?
    > no way

    LOL!!!!

    (cyberspeak for "laughing out loud"!!!)
  2. by   moonchild20002000
    NO! I would not even think of crossing a picket line.Patients are suffering even dying,it's time for nurses to unite and end the insanity!
  3. by   JANRN
    NO WAY!! i would not under any circumstances or for any amount of "scab" money ..nursing already has enough dissention in the ranks.
  4. by   mustangsheba
    Personally, I consider picket lines unprofessional. I think we should just stay home, all of us, en masse. But I would NOT cross a picket line.
  5. by   -jt
    [QUOTE] How many "professional" level job markets have members in a union and going on strikes?
    QUOTE]

    I dont have time to search for the exact answer for you, you can probably do that better yourself if you really want the info but doctors have been on strike & continue to go on strike in this country & also in Canada. Unionizing is still considered by the AMA & ANA to be the professional thing to do in these circumstances.

    from The Doctors council - an MD/DDS union affiliated with the Service Employees International Union in NY:
    " Unions do not diminish our professionalism. Rather, they enhance
    it. The notion of a professional in medicine has certainly changed. As a profession today, we are invisible. Are we to continue to stand idly by, powerless, as others dictate how we provide essential medical care? Is it professional to allow entrepreneurs to dictate medical diagnoses and treatments? Is it professional to allow them to place gag orders on us, require drive-through mastectomies and one day post partum hospital stays for new mothers? Is it professional to ask patients to diagnose themselves prior to going to an emergency room, or allow substitution for doctors prescriptions as corporate policy?......." http://mamma61.mamma.com/Search?eng=...r+union&idx=12

    From healthcare professionals in Canada:
    "When the Saskatchewan government put its hospital insurance plan to work in 1948, a counterattack was launched. Elements of the American Medical Association advised Saskatchewan doctors not to permit physician services to be part of the publicly funded plan. The first day the plan came into effect, the government was met with the first doctor's strike in Canadian history. The government responded by recruiting doctors from Great Britain......." http://www.revolutionmag.com/newrev/canadart.html

    from NYC MDs:
    ""Winning the right to unionize gives us a tremendous opportunity to give our patients the best care and to protect our rights and improve our working conditions," said Susan Williams, M.D., a member of the organizing committee....The major issues are fair compensation, since most of the doctors had not received a raise in many years (they did get a small raise last year, soon after the Union filed for recognition) and improved working conditions. Doctors Council will continue to fight to bring these doctors to the bargaining table to address their many legitimate concerns...." http://mamma61.mamma.com/Search?eng=...r+union&idx=12


  6. by   -jt
    [QUOTE]The major issues are fair compensation, since most of the doctors had not received a raise in many years (they did get a small raise last year, soon after the Union filed for recognition) and improved working conditions.[Q]

    there. they said it.... number one.... fair compenstaion. Why do some people feel this should be last on a nurses list? why should we have to defend wanting to be paid what we're worth - and defend ourselves not only with administrators but with our own colleagues. Many Nurses who will cross strike lines of other nurses, look down on the striking nurses, calling them "unprofessional", berating them for striking or for making economics a part of the issues, telling the strikers if they wanted to make money they shouldnt have become nurses. All the while those scabs are saying this, theyre walking across the strike line to be paid a fortune for replacing the striking nurse. Just a bit hypocritical, yes?
  7. by   fergus51
    This might give you some more opinions against strikes.
  8. by   Zee_RN
    A few years ago I would have say YES. I was raised in a management household. My pre-nursing career was management. I have seen some unions raise themselves to such a level that they destroyed their own membership.

    But now...I would definitely NOT cross a picket line...I would be ON the picket line. Not for my sake but for my PATIENTS' sake. Do I think I earn what I'm worth? No. But that is not why I'd strike. I didn't go into nursing for the money (no kidding, eh?). I'm in nursing to take care of patients...and that is why I would STRIKE. Because management is not in business of taking care of patients, patients are low on their priority list. As nurses, we know that is ALL ABOUT PATIENT CARE.

    It is short-sighted to think that crossing a picket line actually provides patient care. It may for that day, that week, etc., but in the long run it hinders our ability to provide the best possible care. Its analogous to the old saying "Give a man a fish and he eats for a day; Teach a man to fish and he eats for a lifetime." We may give the patient a nurse for today but in future days there may be no nurses. You have to see the BIG picture; you have to see beyond just today.

    A hospital in our area went on a three-day strike a few months ago. I was appalled to see management state in the newspaper that business was unaffected...everything was proceeding 'business as usual.' Tells you what they think of nurses right there.
  9. by   Nursey644
    [quote]Originally posted by -jt:
    I can understand that low pay, excessive patient load, downsizing, and working conditions are a major problem. However, why put the patients at risk by not taking care of them. To me this is Patient Abandament and very unethical. [Q]

    How can nurses utter that first sentence up there & then say the second & third?

    why not ask the hospitals "why put the pts at risk" everyday with their abusive, cost-cutting policies??? A strike situation is the hospital's doing. They are to blame. Let them answer that question. And while theyre at it, why not ask them how they can inconvenience their pts with a strike in the first place. Ask how much do they care about their pts & why they would rather transfer them to other facilities, or have limited numbers of scabs caring for them instead of just sitting down with their own staff, negotiating fairly, & reaching an agreement both sides can live with?

    Ask them how ethical it is to be forcing their own nurses out the door. Is it the pts who they are putting first & foremost or is the dollar$$$?

    When your hospital is compromising pt care & safety as well as your own health, & refuses to do anything about it no matter how long you talk, beg, plead, what do you, as a patient advocate suggest doing about it? If not to walk out in protest, AFTER giving the hospital 10 days to make other arrangements to take care of those pts, & actually scheduling the start of the strike, what do you suggest should be done to correct the conditions that are presently putting you & the pts at risk? The pts are now at risk everyday by the daily conditions in which you work, not by you taking a stand to improve those conditions.

    With the procedure that nurses unions follow for a strike, No pt is abandoned. I cant understand why that point does not get thru to the people who use the inaccurate statement about abandoning pts as an excuse to be a scab. Maybe its denial to justify the fact that they are a scab - something most working people look down on. Pts would only be abandoned if you took report & walked out in the middle of your shift. Thats not how its done in healthcare.

    As far as ethics, how ethical is it for the hospital to keep you & the pts in the current dismal unsafe conditions all so that they can make another dollar in profit?? While the Nyack, NY hospital told its nurse it could not make the improvements they needed because they couldnt afford it & therefore refused to negotiate, it has just been reported in the news that they actually spent $19 MILLION $$$ on scabs & union-busting. If they were willing to spend that kind of money to keep their nurses out for 6 months & had that kind of money to spend, they certainly could well have afforded to make the workplace improvements needed to attract more Rns, & provide a safer environment for both pts & Rns. There is no excuse for crossing a strike line.

    If anyone is "abandoning" the pts in this situation, it is the hospital they are paying for services.

    I just got back from one of those dreaded strikes let me tell you something...It was the staff that was unprofessional. Stating that the "scab nurses were taking money away from their families" This is an untruth they were the ones who made the decision to go on strike it was not us. We were simply there to take care of the patients that were abandoned by the striking union. Furthermore when we left, the resident's families stated that the patient's had never had such good care. What does that say about the staff? And, they had more help that we had on the floors. Sometimes what the unions are fighting for doesn't make sense. How does unemployment insurance better the residents? I could see if they were fighting for additional supplies for patient care or better equipment but they are not. Now mind you, this is only one facility. I am totally aware that different facilities have different reasons however, don't get on to the "scab nurses" we are there to do a job just like union nurses. I come from a non-unionized state and let me tell you I would have it no other way. I do not like unions and find them to be a lot more trouble than they are worth. If you don't like what is happening in your hospital move on! All hospitals are not the same and as you may or may not be aware there is a nursing shortage. Jobs are a dime a dozen!!! Stop complaining and belly-aching about stuff that can not be changed. There is nothing wrong with strike nursing!
    You might consider it if you want a change!


    ------------------
    Nursey644 :>
  10. by   night owl
    Absolutely would cross that line and why do you think I would? For the same reasons everyone else did. For our patients, for our patients,for our patients!!! I don't believe that they should have to suffer for my betterment. I'm sure agency nurses would be called in, but We know them much better than any ole agency. I work LTC and to bring in a whole new batch of nurses would really confuse the poor old souls. So count me out of the picket line, I'm too busy doing what I do best...Nursing the elderly.
  11. by   nursejanedough
    I just reread my old post about my dad being a union organizer. He died about 3 years ago and I guess in a way I am still grieving. I was afraid my post might be misunderstood. When I said he was in Miss. after King was shot and he had to check in so his bosses knew he was alive, I meant that the "whites" were threatening his life. He was trying to organize fair treatment for mostly Afro-Americans, blacks, colored. My dad was white and he was called a "nig..." lover many times. It was the whites that threatend his life back in the sixties. I just found out they even threatened to do harm to his children. My mother is just as brave as he was. They both stood up for what they believed in.
  12. by   -jt
    Originally posted by Nursey644:
    [B]
    I come from a non-unionized state and let me tell you I would have it no other way.
    ]
    most scabs do. its a different mentality in those places. So, if youre going to make a living being a scab, then learn about the mentality of workers in a UNIONIZED state first, & learn to accept the emotions this vile activity conjures up in people who ARE in a union state. Theres a reason scabs are paid much more than staff. How much can you be bought for? And theres a reason they are driven to work in vans with black-out windows. If you dont understand that, read Jack London's poem about scabs. (its online now & can be found with a search). But if youre going to make your living crossing other RNs strike lines, then just deal with the reactions you encounter as an expected part of the "job". Dont expect anyone one to be kissing your feet for crossing their line. Whatver you experience comes with the territory. Workers in unionized states look at scabs as the scum of the earth. Something that people like you from non-unionized places may not be able to understand. But Thats why you are being paid so much to put yourself in there in the first place. Combat pay.
  13. by   Q.
    Originally posted by night owl:
    Absolutely would cross that line and why do you think I would? For the same reasons everyone else did. For our patients, for our patients,for our patients!!! I don't believe that they should have to suffer for my betterment. I'm sure agency nurses would be called in, but We know them much better than any ole agency. I work LTC and to bring in a whole new batch of nurses would really confuse the poor old souls. So count me out of the picket line, I'm too busy doing what I do best...Nursing the elderly.
    I'm sorry, but I would much rather "confuse" some patients than accidently mismedicate and kill them because I was forced to work 16 hours and I'm unsafe, or have them be sitting alone in their room, decubiti worsening, because there is not enough staff to turn them. Sure, they won't be confused, but they will recognize me as the nurse who gave them the wrong cardiac med.

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