Strike nursing

  1. 0
    Just wanted to get some info on how some nurses only work strike positions. Are there enough out there to make a fairly routine salary? I currently work as a traveler and have thrown in a few strikes. Would like to do more, but my travel assignments have interfered and I like to eat. Any info would be greatly appreciated
  2. 26,512 Visits
    Find Similar Topics
  3. 61 Comments so far...

  4. 30
    I find it stunningly ironic, that a nurse who makes a living undermining the livelihood efforts of other nurses, is here asking for advice in how to obtain more of such employment. If you want to be a nursing mercenary, that's certainly your choice and right; but I for one would never assist you (or those of your ilk) in such efforts. You're not the only nurse who needs to eat; IMHO, your employment strategy of stabbing your colleagues in the back is akin to cannibalism.
    Last edit by Emergency RN on Apr 2, '11
  5. 16
    Quote from Emergency RN
    I find it stunningly ironic, that a nurse who makes a living undermining the livelihood efforts of other nurses, is here asking for advice in how to obtain more of such employment. If you want to be a nursing mercenary, that's certainly your choice and right; but I for one would never assist you (or those of your ilk) in such efforts. You're not the only nurse who needs to eat; IMHO, your employment strategy of stabbing your colleagues in the back is akin to cannibalism.
    Well said. More politely said than anything I would have come up with, I might add.
    MissM.RN, Sisyphus, imintrouble, and 13 others like this.
  6. 3
    In this job market, even crossing the line becomes viable.

    As a grad I'll do it now, no bloody institution does it. If the Unions want to keep their positions to themselves I'll be glad to cross the line to do so.

    Edit: I'm not a new grad anymore, I can't even get a nursing job anymore.
  7. 23
    i'd scrap road kill off the side of hwy 55 for a paycheck before i'd wear the scrubs of a scab!
    Spinmass, imintrouble, GrumpyRN, and 20 others like this.
  8. 21
    When we were negotiating our first contract after we unionized, the negotiations dragged on for a long time and were not going that well. A long-time patient whom I had know for some years was in the hospital with a pneumothorax that wouldn't reduce, so he was hanging out with a chest tube for quite a while. I stopped in to see him one day. He was an old United Mine Workers guy. He asked me how the negotiations were going and I said not all that well. He said: " If you guys strike, somebody's going to have to carry me out of here. I've never been on the wrong side of a picket line in my life and I'm sure not going to die on the wrong side of one".
    kateyes7, Sisyphus, imintrouble, and 18 others like this.
  9. 5
    Quote from trulefty
    Just wanted to get some info on how some nurses only work strike positions. Are there enough out there to make a fairly routine salary? I currently work as a traveler and have thrown in a few strikes. Would like to do more, but my travel assignments have interfered and I like to eat. Any info would be greatly appreciated

    THere are several agencies that hire nurses to work strikes. US Nursing is one of them. Just google it! I have a friend who does this and makes incredible money. Unions lost their effectiveness years ago. Someone has to care for the patients after they've been abandoned by their overly compassionate nurses who are only striking in their own best interests.
  10. 15
    Quote from eglide87
    THere are several agencies that hire nurses to work strikes. US Nursing is one of them. Just google it! I have a friend who does this and makes incredible money. Unions lost their effectiveness years ago. Someone has to care for the patients after they've been abandoned by their overly compassionate nurses who are only striking in their own best interests.
    "lost their effectiveness"? Not my union. We've not only won major legal protections for nurses, but the best pay and benefits in the world. If you looked on my dues as an investment, and evaluated it as you do any other investment, I make an annual return of about 900-1000% percent, without counting any of the gains other than just straight-up money - things like the fact that our benefits can't be cut, protection against unsafe floating, the right to representation in disciplinary actions, and the staffing ratio law that my union wrote and pushed through. Nurses won't strike lightly - they strike only when management pushes them to the limit - usually be taking away wages and benefits. And when they do strike, their fellow nurses ought to respect that.
  11. 9
    I sincerely respect my fellow nurses, but I could never respect a nursing strike. You may think you have the best pay and benefits in the world but I also feel the same way, and there's not a unionized hospital within 5hrs of where I practice. I've been in the job force for over 30 years and have been in a union and for the life of can't see the need. My stepfather was union and i can remember times when we, as a family, suffered financially due to a strike....ridiculous. I currently live in a RTW state and the unions here are minimal and have almost zero bargaining power. I just can't see the benefit of a union here when they are all but powerless to effect change.

    I personally have no problem with those who cross the picket line. Someone has to care for the patients and they should be paid to do so! For the OP, it's a financially viable option whether or the pro union camp agrees or not. In this day and age with our economy, nothing is off limits except that as deemed illegal. Moral obligation to my profession vs providing for my wife and children = crossing the picket line EVERY TIME.

    Just my 2 cents......
  12. 11
    ......... Gee, I hope that you trip over the line........ scab!
    Sisyphus, imintrouble, HazelLPN, and 8 others like this.


Top