why so mean? - page 3

Hey fellow CNA's and student CNA's. I am currently in my last week of classes for my CNA training. Graduation is Friday. I love it. Figure this will be a great job while I am going to school for my... Read More

  1. by   Lisa CCU RN
    Quote from chadash
    I have to stick up for valifay. I don't think she is saying this is right, just a reality. I am new on a unit myself, and have driven many a nurse to distraction. They have withstood it with grace. I have had a few unit clerks and NAs that, I am sure, I am standing on their last nerve, and ,God love em, they get to the point they have to give it to me. It is tough learning the ropes, but it is also hard on those who are trying to handle the stress and responsibility of doing what they have to do.
    I am in a great situation right now, but I have been in facilities that pride themselves on abusing new people. That is just not right. If that is the "culture" of your workplace, go somewhere else. I worked in one place where I was called an idiot to my face.
    But, if someone is just a bit tough on you, you will grow from it. I have gotten a "talking to", and it is not comfortable, but I listen and usually there is a point to the critizism that will make me a better worker. Try not to take it personally. See it as improving your job skills. And try to set an example of courtesy.

    I'm a student and I can see where valifay is coming from also.

    However, there is obviously a need to train those coming behind you, so there is no need to be rude, however slow a person may be.

    Just think, if you train them right, maybe they'll get better or better yet they will know how to take good care of YOU.
  2. by   platinum_garb
    I normally don't throw in my opinion on the slamfests that happen in these threads, but I felt compelled to here. The staff CNA's/Aides/whatever shouldn't be "training" the students in the first place. The students should be taught in the classroom and demo tasks on learning dummies and other classmates before they go into the LTC or hospital environment to learn. The paid Aides at the facilities are there to remind you where the linen closet is or to point you to the right wing or to assist with a transfer...not to "teach".
    I've run into so many bitter Aides...but I think that a lot of the time they feel spread thin with students around because they get asked little questions here and there. Unfortunately, those are often the same people who ***** about their boyfriends/car payments/resident in the bathroom down the hall in front of other residents while doing their ADL's and what not. Very professional!! *sarcasm*

    Don't let these people bring you down...just remember that (usually) it's not what other people are or are not doing...it's what YOU are doing that matters most!!
  3. by   vampiregirl
    Quote from platinum_garb
    The staff CNA's/Aides/whatever shouldn't be "training" the students in the first place. The students should be taught in the classroom and demo tasks on learning dummies and other classmates before they go into the LTC or hospital environment to learn. The paid Aides at the facilities are there to remind you where the linen closet is or to point you to the right wing or to assist with a transfer...not to "teach".
    I agree that the CNA's working the floor shouldn't be "instructing" students or new aides. That responsibility should rest with the instructor of the class or their designee.

    Having said that though... there is a huge difference between performing the skills on a classmate or manequin and performing the skills on a resident. The true personal interactions don't exist in these senarios. Each resident is unique. A CNA who is familiar with a resident will be aware of little things that aren't taught in class, the daily routine, along with the capabilities and preferences of each resident. Little things that make the resident comfortable and encourage trust in those taking care of them. Knowing that Mrs. X always wears a sweater over her outfit. Knowing that Mrs. Q always wears red lipstick to dinner. That Mr. Z likes his tv turned to a sporting event after he is settled down in his recliner after a meal. The things that take only moment to complete. Yet they can mean so much to that resident. A staff who works daily with the residents can pass on this knowledge on. Kind of another opportunity to "pay it forward".
    Last edit by vampiregirl on Dec 6, '06 : Reason: my brain isn't working well this evening
  4. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from johnsonprn2
    Why are LPN's and fellow, already graduated CNA's so mean?
    I'm an LVN who always treats students and CNAs with kindness and respect.

    However, a handful of the experienced CNAs and LVNs treated me rudely when I was an LVN student last year. I know the feeling when someone is mean to you for no apparent reason. However, I do not know why they're being mean. I just know that their time will come (and payback is a b***h).
  5. by   JeepDudeRN
    Hello-
    Well heres another perspective. First let me say that I am a CNA, and a full time RN student, so I know how I want to be treated, and I know to treat others. I work in a sub acute wing in a large rehab facilty. We are a facilty that also trains student CNA's, and Nurses. I am normally picked to be a trainer 95% of the time. I consider it an honor that my Supervisors trust me enough to show the trainees the ropes. I would NEVER belittle anyone who was learning. Yes, we are sometimes shorthanded, just like everywhere else,and it does get frustrating, but ya know what? When I had to turn n my letters of reccomendation for the RN program, my supervisors made it a point to let the school know that I am a trainer, and very happy to do it, and pretty darn good at it too. In my interview for the program, the Nursing director told me that little side note went a long way with them. So there ya go. Just my 2 cents ~
  6. by   qaqueen
    Johnsonprn2,

    No matter where you go, some people will be PITA. Also, as a new CNA, you will be scrutinized by many, helped by few. It is okay, do the best you can, take care of your patients and know that your reward is that you made somebody's life a little better.

    Valifay,

    I get that you are frustrated. People who hate training are usually not good at it anyway. If the folks you train are slow, remember you were once too. If they are getting in your way, maybe you aren't giving them appropriate guidance. If you don't like the way things are getting done, stop and think, every task needs to be completed, but there is often more than one way to handle it. Not everything has to be done YOUR WAY. Perhaps if you wait a few days and then re-read what you have written here, you can gain new insight that will make your life easier.

    Most of us get into healthcare, not for the money, but because we want to care for others in a useful way. Being a CNA is not about the glory, it is about looking at yourself in the mirror and knowing you have done well.

    Blessed Be
  7. by   JeepDudeRN
    VERY well said, qaqueen.
  8. by   chadash
    Like the post about the nurse who always says:"Glad to see you!" Most of the nurses on my new job say that when I come in, and they can not know how much that helps.(Hope they mean it!) What the oldies need to remember is how insecure new employees and students feel. Reassurance and patience can do wonders.
    As I mentioned, I was in a couple abusive work places in the past, and I would suggest: if this place you are at now is truly like that, dont seek permanent employment there. I still duck and cover needlessly when approached by fellow employees: sort of a shell shock kind of reaction. An abusive work place situation does leave a mark.
    Last edit by chadash on Dec 7, '06 : Reason: horrible grammar, slightly improved
  9. by   gr8rnpjt
    Quote from valifay
    Sorry the truth hurts sometimes...but its the truth. No, I do not treat students badly and I'm not in school to be a nurse, but I am a student and a CNA.


    I am a bit confused. Your profile says;



    Age:
    26
    Location:
    Springfield, IL
    Nursing Education:
    Nursing Student
    Occupation:
    CNA
    Country:
    USA


    What's up with that?
    Last edit by jb2u on Dec 7, '06 : Reason: corrected so that quote appears in box
  10. by   TAB_RN
    Quote from valifay
    Honestly, because students get inthe way. We are already short staffed and have too much too do in a short amount of time. Now, don't take this the wrong way, we are glad you take twice as long to do showers and 5 times longer to get vitals, you get stuff done, but your still in the way. Its very annoying! I'm sure this sounds rude and all, but its true. Once you get working in the field and have to train a student, you will understand. We don't ask to train you, you are given to us to deal with. But, don't get discouraged, once you are an actual employee and prove yourself a hard worker, you won't be looked down upon. Congrats on your graduation and good luck to you!

    You may not ask to train students, but you CHOSE to work in a teaching hospital
  11. by   slou!
    Quote from valifay
    Honestly, because students get inthe way. We are already short staffed and have too much too do in a short amount of time. Now, don't take this the wrong way, we are glad you take twice as long to do showers and 5 times longer to get vitals, you get stuff done, but your still in the way. Its very annoying! I'm sure this sounds rude and all, but its true. Once you get working in the field and have to train a student, you will understand. We don't ask to train you, you are given to us to deal with. But, don't get discouraged, once you are an actual employee and prove yourself a hard worker, you won't be looked down upon. Congrats on your graduation and good luck to you!
    Wow, don't complain about being short staffed when you have an attitude like THIS towards new CNAs/students!
  12. by   gretchengirl
    Quote from valifay
    Honestly, because students get inthe way. We are already short staffed and have too much too do in a short amount of time. Now, don't take this the wrong way, we are glad you take twice as long to do showers and 5 times longer to get vitals, you get stuff done, but your still in the way. Its very annoying! I'm sure this sounds rude and all, but its true. Once you get working in the field and have to train a student, you will understand. We don't ask to train you, you are given to us to deal with. But, don't get discouraged, once you are an actual employee and prove yourself a hard worker, you won't be looked down upon. Congrats on your graduation and good luck to you!

    everybody was a student at one time or the other.
  13. by   valifay
    I think you all need to relax a little and read my other post. I am not rude or cruel to my students or my patients and never have or ever will be! I'm a favorite where I work and actually just got employee of the month! despite your thoughts, I'm probably one of the people you WANT to take care of your family member because I am so thorough and persistant. I'm the CNA thats not afraid to call the health department on my own employers negligence. (this once saved a mans life) I keep it real when I am training though. I am very persistant in my work and expect the same out of whoever I'm training. I shouldn't have to tell a student how to make a bed or where the linen cart is. I'm also not going to stand for students standing out of the way and discussing their plans for the weekend. If you don't jump in or show the slightest bit of interest after I've asked for your assistance get out of the room. And I'm not saying ALL students are like this. But we all know the type of student I am talking about...the ones who are only training for a paycheck and really don't care about the person in the bed. Those are the CNA's you all should be bashing, not me! But yes, if keeping it real makes me a *mean person (*edit), then so be it, but my patients LOVE me for it!
    And whoever asked about my profile, I just forgot to change it. I got into nursing school, but decided to go into another area of the medical field instead. I'll still be taking care of people and a patient advocate. A better opportunity came a;long and I couldn't pass it up
    Last edit by valifay on Dec 29, '06

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