Who or what...

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    inspired you to become a C.N.A.???

    My father-in-law passed away last summer & while he was in hospice, the nurses & the c.n.a.'s at the hospital were just fantastic. While he was "okay", he would go on & on about a particular c.n.a. He just thought that she was fabulous & he'd joke around that he'd have to go to the hospital again just to get a decent haircut, as the c.n.a. was, apparently, the only one who could cut his hair worth a darn. At his very, very last moments, she gave him a haircut. My mother-in-law still praises this c.n.a. each & every time I mention my own desire to become one. This girl probably goes to work each & every day & just is really great at her job. Little does she know, that the way she treated & cared for my father-in-law during each of his hospital visits & his final days - well, she was a huge influence in my life. The nurses there were wonderful. I'd really like to get into hospice care, myself, one day. Funny thing. I always thought I'd want to help deliver babies... =)
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    That's a wonderful story. The truth is, when I was 15 I was working in a retirement home. back then they were the only ones that would give a 15 year old a job. I worked as part of the wait staff, serving dinner to the elderly. The thing is, I was never happier than when I got out of the kitchen, as was able to help transport them back to there rooms. We would remember, so and so, can't have orange juice because he takes his pill with dinner, and just random detailes that that to take care of them. I told myself, someday, I'll have more patient contact, little did I know, here in the big nursing school waiting room, that I would get a chance to do just that!
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    Irene Joy - it's exciting, isn't it! To be living your life while your dreams are coming true! Thanks for sharing your story! Have a good evening! =)
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    Quote from couldntbhappier
    inspired you to become a C.N.A.???

    My father-in-law passed away last summer & while he was in hospice, the nurses & the c.n.a.'s at the hospital were just fantastic. While he was "okay", he would go on & on about a particular c.n.a. He just thought that she was fabulous & he'd joke around that he'd have to go to the hospital again just to get a decent haircut, as the c.n.a. was, apparently, the only one who could cut his hair worth a darn. At his very, very last moments, she gave him a haircut. My mother-in-law still praises this c.n.a. each & every time I mention my own desire to become one. This girl probably goes to work each & every day & just is really great at her job. Little does she know, that the way she treated & cared for my father-in-law during each of his hospital visits & his final days - well, she was a huge influence in my life. The nurses there were wonderful. I'd really like to get into hospice care, myself, one day. Funny thing. I always thought I'd want to help deliver babies... =)
    Many Hospice nurses get into the field after having been inspired by a personal experience of someone who provided wonderful care to a loved one.
    I, too, considered labor and delivery at one time.(And I've been in Hospice nursing for over 20 years.) Strange as it may seem, labor and delivery and hospice have much in common. If you ever make the choice to do hospice nursing, it will be a most rewarding choice.
    Jwelhwel
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    It was the same for me as well, and there really is something special about Hospice nurses. My husband died from cancer a year ago and the nurses that I met during his time in the hospital and hospice inspired me to become a nurse. Now I'm in my second day of clinicals and I'm almost done with my CNA course.

    I think what struck me the most was that it wasn't about just doing the daily care stuff - the nurses I met truly cared about my husband and they were advocates for him to get the best care possible even in his terminal situation. Even after his condition made him stable enough that I could look after him at home they encouraged us to get a second opinion. As a result he lived a little longer than his first oncologist thought he would. Everytime now that I am interacting with a patient I always keep in mind what I learned from them. Its the kind of nurse I hope to be someday.

    -Maria
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    I became a CNA when I was 22 as a way to begin my healthcare career. I saw it as a great chance to gain experience and to be sure I was on the right track with my career decisions (to be a RN).


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