What Do Acute Care CNA's Do?

  1. 0 Hello, I am a new CNA and I will be starting the Acute Care CNA course this month. I want to gain good hospital experience before I apply to Master's Entry programs in a few years, so I do not want to work in a LTC facility. I am wondering what excatly Acute Care CNA's do? Is it the same responsibilities as LTC CNA's? Thanks for your help!
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  3. Visit  junogreen29 profile page

    About junogreen29

    30 Years Old; Joined Jan '09; Posts: 1.

    6 Comments so far...

  4. Visit  rancelumsden profile page
    0
    Many, if not most people in a hospital are 'acute care'. So essentially, you're asking what tasks you do in a hospital. If you search through the archives, you'll see several postings on what CNA's do in a hospital. It's a relatively long answer which is why I don't want to repeat. The short answer is yes, you do the same tasks as LTC (ambulate people, make beds, toilet, personal care), but there are so many more tasks you will perform in a hospital dealing with oxygen, assisting the nurse, monitoring of vitals, taking lots of vitals, possibly do EKG's and draw blood depending on hospital and training, etc.
  5. Visit  EToThePri profile page
    3
    I work full time in a hospital and part time in a nursing home.

    In the nursing home I'm only allowed to do the basic CNA skills(beds,baths/showers,feeding,personal care,toileting,vitals,i&o,etc.)

    In the hospital I do all of the same work as in the nursing home but in addition I also: insert foleys, d/c foleys, straight caths, bladder scans, measure pulse ox, enemas, fecal impactions (ugh!), dressing changes, accuchecks, apply topical medications, unit secretary work,etc.

    It is true that working in a hospital you do gain more experience. Good Luck!!!
    CNA1991, Nuatlus, and rtimmons like this.
  6. Visit  RNinSF profile page
    0
    how do I get certified to be an acute care CNA?

    thanks..
  7. Visit  Girl Scout profile page
    0
    Quote from mtarshis
    how do I get certified to be an acute care CNA?

    thanks..
    It sounds (to me) like acute care CNA is what's called a Patient Care Tech/Associate/Assistant here (draw blood, run labs, caths, change dressing, etc). I'm enrolled in both CNA and PCA here, but the PCA part won't start for another 4 weeks (after I pass my state). Here the hospitals seem to want to hire CNAs that have experience in hospitals, or PCAs. I haven't looked at job postings lately though.
  8. Visit  ZanatuBelmont profile page
    0
    Quote from rancelumsden
    Many, if not most people in a hospital are 'acute care'. So essentially, you're asking what tasks you do in a hospital.
    I disagree. There is a difference in the level of care you provide to patients depending on the unit you are working in. It is not "just hospital work." Different floors require different skills and intellectual ability.
  9. Visit  ZanatuBelmont profile page
    0
    Quote from EToThePri
    I work full time in a hospital and part time in a nursing home.

    In the nursing home I'm only allowed to do the basic CNA skills(beds,baths/showers,feeding,personal care,toileting,vitals,i&o,etc.)

    In the hospital I do all of the same work as in the nursing home but in addition I also: insert foleys, d/c foleys, straight caths, bladder scans, measure pulse ox, enemas, fecal impactions (ugh!), dressing changes, accuchecks, apply topical medications, unit secretary work,etc.

    It is true that working in a hospital you do gain more experience. Good Luck!!!
    What state do you work in? Where I live the only time a CNA does the work you mentioned is when it's "secret" to the "outside world." Just curious... I find it very interesting that the work a CNA can do varies dramatically from state to state.


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