What did I do wrong???

  1. I'm currently in LPN program this quarter. I took my CNA class back in January, graduated, got my license. I got a job as a CNA last month, I have been working there double on the weekend. It's exhausting and uncomfortable all the time. Two weeks ago, I thought I loved that job because all the residents are so nice and sweet. They encourage me, tell me how good as the caregiver I am. Not until last weekend, I was confused on the new run.
    I remember I tried my ass off to get all the resident what they need. Apparently, it was not enough. The nurse works there and the charge nurse wrote a complaint about me. They told me I didn't get the resident up, didn't take them to go eat, hiding and ignore the call light.
    I was in shock when they told me that. I was literally on my feel for 15 hours and it's still wrong. I am so upset about myself, I keep asking the questions why are my co-workers don't like me. Every time I ask my co-worker, I feel like they are not happy about it. I tried to help them but they don't do the same to me.
    Anybody here experiences the same situation, this is my first time dealing with some situation like this. I feel like they are not fair to me. School is heavy and I'm about to quit that job. Please share with me, anything can help to get me over this stress.
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  2. Visit veenguyen profile page

    About veenguyen

    Joined: Nov '17; Posts: 4

    7 Comments

  3. by   Kittykitty82
    I can only speak from my own experience. As bad as this sounds, I think the problem is you are still a "noob" and you haven't earned your spot in the group, yet. Lots of individuals become CNAs, most work for a very short time before they either know they love being a CNA or they hate it and quit. Lots of people quit, I mean a ton of people that become CNAs; up and just quit within a month or two of their start date. So I think the CNAs are waiting to see if you are going to stick around before investing the energy to start a friendship with you. Once you earn your place in the group they will start helping you out; I'm sure of it.

    As for the nurses, well, they want to work with competent CNAs and as a future nurse. They expect you to run like a jack-rabbit and be the best. It is a little weeding out the weak and a little toughening you for the responsibility of being a nurse in a year or so. Just to be clear they are not going to go easier on you because of your heavy school load. Most nurses I knew would actually work the nursing students harder and demand more from them. It may not be fair, but life isn't fair!

    However, you may have found the facility from H*LL and your best choice is to find a CNA job at a different facility. If this is the case then, I am sorry. Those places exist where the CNAs are in general, unfriendly and the Nurses are just tired of the ever revolving door of new hires.

    In the end only you can decide if you need to quit or if you have the ability to find a way to stay. No one knows you as well as you know yourself. So my advice is simple, do what is best for you!
  4. by   veenguyen
    Kittykitty82, Thanks you so much for replying me. I decided last night to quit the job. I already have another one with the agency. After class today, I realized that maybe it's because of the double shift. I couldn't handle it so that why I didn't do my best. Thanks again for the advice about the staff.
  5. by   Here.I.Stand
    Quote from veenguyen
    They told me I didn't get the resident up, didn't take them to go eat, hiding and ignore the call light.
    I was in shock when they told me that. I was literally on my feel for 15 hours and it's still wrong. I am so upset about myself, I keep asking the questions why are my co-workers don't like me
    Did you? I was a CNA in LTC for a few years, and I get it -- time management can be very difficult! I remember a shift where we were short a CNA (leaving 2 CNAs for 30 residents.) We were about 3/4 finished with evening cares...... and then we had a tornado warning. We had to evacuate EVERYONE into the hallway, and then start over when we got the all-clear.

    That said. If it's true that the resident was left in bed and not fed, that is considered neglect. 1) we can't let a helpless elder go hungry, and 2) pressure ulcers ("bedsores") can happen VERY quickly -- especially if the person is incontinent and/or malnourished. This is why they need to be repositioned every two hours.

    Say the resident has been lying on his left side for several hours. When you turn him, you may see that his left hip looks a bit pale or pinkish -- with pressure to an area, those tiny capillaries are squeezed, making blood flow more difficult. If you turn the pt onto his right side, the skin will quickly retirn to normal. However if that pressure continues, it progresses to an injury to the skin.

    Now if what the report says isn't true, that you did feed, turn, provide hygiene -- I am sorry that happened. You seem like a nice person.
    Personally with someone as new as you are, I would start by teaching you or ask the manager for more orientation time. If it continues to be a pattern, then that is a huge deal and would need to be dealt with as such.

    I'm saying all this because there will ALWAYS be too many residents and too little time, and we have to roll with it. The good news is with time and experience, even just getting to know the residents' routine etc, it will get better! I hope your new job goes well!
  6. by   Wannabenurseneko
    When I was in the CNA course, our instructor warned us about nurses doing stuff like this. She told us to always carry a note book ,and document writing date , and time; That way if we got into trouble we will always have our notes to back us up .
  7. by   veenguyen
    Quote from Here.I.Stand

    Now if what the report says isn't true, that you did feed, turn, provide hygiene -- I am sorry that happened. You seem like a nice person.
    Personally with someone as new as you are, I would start by teaching you or ask the manager for more orientation time. If it continues to be a pattern, then that is a huge deal and would need to be dealt with as such.

    I'm saying all this because there will ALWAYS be too many residents and too little time, and we have to roll with it. The good news is with time and experience, even just getting to know the residents' routine etc, it will get better! I hope your new job goes well!
    Thanks for your advice. I learned a lot from this experience. It was good at first when people said I was doing good. I just needed more orentation time to get used to the residents routine. They orentated the other guy for almost 2 weeks but only four with me. Plus I know my body can't handle 16 hours shift.
  8. by   veenguyen
    Quote from Wannabenurseneko
    When I was in the CNA course, our instructor warned us about nurses doing stuff like this. She told us to always carry a note book ,and document writing date , and time; That way if we got into trouble we will always have our notes to back us up .
    True, part of this was I didn't have time to chart all in the system. I should finish it all before leaving the facility. I learned that if we don't chart, we didn't do the job!
  9. by   Wannabenurseneko
    Quote from veenguyen
    True, part of this was I didn't have time to chart all in the system. I should finish it all before leaving the facility. I learned that if we don't chart, we didn't do the job!
    I forgot that , that happens and sometimes you lose track of time with the amount of work you have to do .

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