Nursing Degrees: FAQs Concerning MA-to-RN Mobility - page 3

by TheCommuter Asst. Admin

Numerous medical assistants thoroughly enjoy their jobs as workers in the allied healthcare field and couldn’t imagine doing anything else. Other MAs feel trapped inside a circular vortex where rude doctors, routine tasks, rigid... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from kaydensmom01
    Yes MA's are better at technical tasks such as drawing blood and cathing sometimes, and although it is often confused by the MA as "doing the nurses job", this is not what nurses are hired for.
    Someone once said, "I do more than the nurses!"

    A wise, 'older' and experienced nurse responded, "As a nurse I'm not paid for what I do. I'm paid for what I know."
  2. 0
    Quote from TheCommuter
    Someone once said, "I do more than the nurses!" A wise, 'older' and experienced nurse responded, "As a nurse I'm not paid for what I do. I'm paid for what I know."
    Word. :yes;
  3. 0
    I could not agree with you more! I didn't go through a MA program but via experience have worked as one and now am a LPN, soon to be RN and yet I still could not disagree more with the comment you quoted! At my current job I struggle on a daily basis with what MA's can do without the proper education and foundation and more importantly governing body to oversee. They are unlicensed. At many places they may not even have to complete a program (ie myself). They are not supposed to, nor possess the skills, to assess and teach. Given that how could anyone think they could or should have responsibility for patient care and assessment! Just because some MA's, like myself, may possess "extra" skills and knowledge (likely because they are in their way to another career) that does not mean that they should be used as nurses....ugh, I could go on and on! It scares me because now especially with nursing education under my belt I see the room for error and lower quality patient care when facilities hire MA's in lieu of nurses. My employer included seemingly sees MA's as a lower cost option and thinks it is ok to decrease the number of nurses without clearly defining MA scope and the hierarchy that should exist. Employers and MA's need to be educated about the true nursing role.
    Last edit by melis112287 on Jan 4
  4. 0
    Quote from PMFB-RN
    Oh my gosh! It is all I can do to not reply in the condescending and sarcastic manner the comment above deserves!
    My last comment was supposed to be in response to above, I didn't quote! Oops
  5. 0
    Quote from melis112287
    I could not agree with you more! I didn't go through a MA program but via experience have worked as one and now am a LPN, soon to be RN and yet I still could not disagree more with the comment you quoted! At my current job I struggle on a daily basis with what MA's can do without the proper education and foundation and more importantly governing body to oversee. They are unlicensed. At many places they may not even have to complete a program (ie myself). They are not supposed to, nor possess the skills, to assess and teach. Given that how could anyone think they could or should have responsibility for patient care and assessment! Just because some MA's, like myself, may possess "extra" skills and knowledge (likely because they are in their way to another career) that does not mean that they should be used as nurses....ugh, I could go on and on! It scares me because now especially with nursing education under my belt I see the room for error and lower quality patient care when facilities hire MA's in lieu of nurses. My employer included seemingly sees MA's as a lower cost option and thinks it is ok to decrease the number of nurses without clearly defining MA scope and the hierarchy that should exist. Employers and MA's need to be educated about the true nursing role.
    I have also had several of them tell me they are nurses when I ask "are you a nurse"? Considering several have told me that, and I have little reason to visit a doctors office, I would guess that misrepresenting themselves and nurses is widespread.
    A young man I know was dating a new girl. Among other things he was excited to tell me that she was a nurse. I was happy for them but after several months things he was telling me about her were not adding up. Like for example how she said she could not afford to move out of her parents house despite the fact that she had no debt. I know what newer nurses make where I work and a debt free young person should have no trouble at all affording to live on their own on what nurses make in our area. When I finally met her I asked if she was an LPN or RN? She said she was a "doctors office nurse"!
    In the end it didn't work out, I think in no small part because of her dishonesty.


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