Nursing Degrees: FAQs Concerning MA-to-RN Mobility - page 2

by TheCommuter 5,452 Views | 24 Comments Senior Moderator

Numerous medical assistants thoroughly enjoy their jobs as workers in the allied healthcare field and couldnít imagine doing anything else. Other MAs feel trapped inside a circular vortex where rude doctors, routine tasks, rigid... Read More


  1. 0
    MA school was a breeze compared to RN school.

    I didn't realize ma's worked with catheters.
  2. 1
    Quote from TheCommuter

    Why donít MA-to-LPN or MA-to-RN programs exist? Itís a logical progression!

    The progression doesn't seem all that logical to me. This opinion is coming from a person who completed an MA program in 2000, an LPN/LVN program in 2005, and an LPN-to-RN associate of science degree bridge program in 2010. Medical assisting is a part of the medical model of care provision, whereas nursing has its own distinct nursing model of care. And even though many medical assisting procedural skills overlap with multiple nursing tasks, the two career fields are not as similar as they might seem to the naked eye. Since the LPN and RN roles both fall under the same nursing model, LPN-to-RN bridge programs are offered at countless schools.
    Exactly! MAs are under the medical model. It's totally different than the nursing model of assessing, diagnosing, planning, implementing, evaluating-- task-oriented vs. critical thinking. Our MAs are very good at tasks, but they are not nurses.
    kaydensmom01 likes this.
  3. 0
    Yep, same reason that EMT-RN programs do not exist the model is different, the experience as 4 years as an EMT has made nursing school a lot easier for me though.
  4. 0
    Quote from Deuceswild1
    Yep, same reason that EMT-RN programs do not exist the model is different, the experience as 4 years as an EMT has made nursing school a lot easier for me though.
    On the other hand, a few paramedic-to-RN programs exist. More on that later, though...
  5. 0
    Quote from kaydensmom01
    I completely agree. This is not the first post where you bashed nurses and claimed how anyone can do a nurses job with 12 weeks of orientation- show WHY in the hell are you trying to become a RN? Oh wait it so you can get paid double to just sit on your ass.... Go into a different field because we do not need people like you that belittle the profession. I'm sorry that you do not value your education enough to know that you could not train an MA for 12 weeks to perform a RN's job and completely understand the rationale behind everything. No one has said that MA's would not make it in nursing school, but they are saying that the MA's and RN's education are completely different regardless of performing SOME of the same tasks and it takes longer than 12 weeks to gain that education of the differences. I received a wonderful education and know that I could not train an MA for 12 weeks to perform my job at the same level. Stop generalizing nurses.
    THIS...

    This was hashed out on the other thread...,still not seeing the forest AND the trees...
  6. 0
    Quote from TheCommuter
    On the other hand, a few paramedic-to-RN programs exist. More on that later, though...
    That is true, but paramedics do have a pretty wide scope of practice and operate as main patient care (IVstart, IV meds, airway, needle decompression) where as EMT or MA even less, are not usually the patients main caregiver in any role.
  7. 0
    I commend MAs, I highly doubt a doctor's office would work so smoothly without them. While they are in the medical field, I do not think that they could be a LPN/RN in 12 weeks. The amount of schooling we do to learn to critically think about the patient picture, diagnoses, and medications. I would not feel safe with someone who went to school for 12 weeks. Also it would be difficult for them to pass NCLEX with the variety of questions we were given 12 weeks would not have cut it. Another thing is, this is comparable that a CNAs knowledge and skills should be considered as experience for nursing. I have CNAs/techs in my hospital that draw blood, insert foleys as well.
    If a MA wants to continue on to nursing I would say go for it. I don't see how being a MA limits their capacity to become a nurse. We see CNAs become LPNs/RNS.
  8. 0
    Quote from hope3456
    I have seen ads advertising MA programs (CollegeAmerica) that are claiming to be prereqs for a nursing career - trying to intertwine the two. It is also disturbing that these MA programs thru the "for profit trade schools" cost more than the ADN program at the local CC and MA's get paid like $12?? Yikes.
    OMG. I have never understood this. One could make more slamming coffee at Starbucks.
  9. 0
    Quote from libran1984
    http://allnurses.com/general-nursing...ng-857345.html


    The beginning of the above thread provided an EXCELLENT topic on MAs replacing nurses. If they already perform the tasks, why not just put them on the front line of things right?
    I'm not sure how this is in the rest of the USA, but in California, the answer to this is the nurses unions. They are successful in continually taking scope-of-practice responsibilities away from MAs to prevent facilities from replacing nurses with more budget-oriented, yet skilled persons.
  10. 1
    Quote from smudgetool
    I'm not sure how this is in the rest of the USA, but in California, the answer to this is the nurses unions. They are successful in continually taking scope-of-practice responsibilities away from MAs to prevent facilities from replacing nurses with more budget-oriented, yet skilled persons.
    Or it could be the fact that the MA's care is not at the same standard as a licensed nurses. Yes MA's are better at technical tasks such as drawing blood and cathing sometimes, and although it is often confused by the MA as "doing the nurses job", this is not what nurses are hired for. After all we teach patients to cath themselves and give themselves injections, etc. all of the time and that does not make them a nurse. What makes a nurse different from an MA is their in depth knowledge of the disease processes, medications, therapeutic interventions and their ability to derive the "big picture" of the patient based on the various factors. Nurses are responsible for deciding if an intervention is the correct measure based on the various factors. Not saying an MA is worthless in the least, they are a valuable part of the healthcare team that has their place, but their place is not to replace the nurses.
    SHGR likes this.


Top