Nurse told me to give Medication - page 2

by Purple93

4,611 Views | 25 Comments

So as I posted recently I just started as a CNA. Friday was my third and last day shadowing one of the CNA's that already worked there and Monday I will be on my own. Well yesterday, I was feeding a patient that had been asking... Read More


  1. 1
    Quote from Jory
    I agree with this as well.

    This happens ALL the time in the LTC's here. Many meds need to be given on a full stomach and it's easier to hand them to the CNA if they are assisting with a feeding so they can be given when the meal is finished.

    A CNA could not do the same thing in a med-surg or other hospital unit.

    I personally...see no harm in it. The RN or LPN is responsible for obtaining the correct med, checking a blood pressure or other vital signs (if needed for the med).

    However, NEVER leave medications unattended...EVER.
    I totally disagree with this post and what you guys doing is illegal. As soon as a nurse leaves meds in the hands of a CNA they are leaving it unattended and putting their stupid license on the line. I don't care if the CNA has twenty five years experience and knows all the meds on the planet. If you want to pass meds, go to nursing school and get qualified to do so.
    duskyjewel likes this.
  2. 1
    The nurse knows that CNAs cannot give medications but she was testing the waters. I personally have never asked an aide to give medications and would never dream of doing so (especially since when I worked in the hospital, I barely trusted our aides to take VS.)
    uRNmyway likes this.
  3. 1
    Quote from man-nurse2b
    She knows you cannot give meds and trust me, you would be fired had you given it to the patient. Firstly, just tell her nicely that she is already aware that only registered nurses or LPN's (depending on state) can give meds and it is not in your scope of practice and both you and her would be fired had the nursing board find out and loose your licenses . Secondly you got no idea what the med is for and thirdly you have no idea of the harm or side effects of the meds and you could potentially kill the patient if something was to go wrong. If she does not understand the above, I won't even touch the meds if she offers it for you to give even if she was right there looking, she is being unsafe and could loose her license. The nurse needs to know what tasks can and cannot be delegated.

    I think this is an over-reaction. "Giving meds" and "handing over meds" is not the same thing.

    The CNA didn't pull the med, didn't verify the med, didn't bring the med in the room...the nurse did.

    I personally don't see the big deal in picking up a pill and handing it to someone to put in their mouth.

    Maybe it's wrong in an NCLEX hospital, but in the real world, I can tell you right now this happens all day, every day.
    Paws2people likes this.
  4. 0
    why not call up your nursing board and tell them you give meds for CNA to pass out see how long you will be an RN. Even though I'm just a student It ain't NCLEX hospital, this is the law, unless you from a state that allows that person to be trained in medication administration, she did the right thing to refuse and to leave it sitting on the table.
  5. 1
    Quote from man-nurse2b
    why not call up your nursing board and tell them you give meds for CNA to pass out see how long you will be an RN. Even though I'm just a student It ain't NCLEX hospital, this is the law, unless you from a state that allows that person to be trained in medication administration, she did the right thing to refuse and to leave it sitting on the table.
    ...no she didn't do the right thing by leaving it on the table. If she felt that strongly about not giving the meds she should have picked them up and handed them back to the nurse.

    If you want to get real technical about it, the nurse is supposed to witness the swallow.

    There have been instances where LTC patients will not take meds when given to them only to stockpile them to overdose later.

    You also don't know if the patient will fall asleep and another patient will walk into their room.

    Again, passing meds and "handing over meds" are not the same thing. You are confusing the two. Some states allow for CNA's in LTC to pass meds and this is NOT EVEN CLOSE to the OP's situation.
    uRNmyway likes this.
  6. 0
    I would not have given the medication because in my state, CNAs are not supposed to pass or even "hand over" (I'm sorry, I don't see a difference between the two) meds and a nurse is never supposed to ask a CNA to do so. I wouldn't put my license (or the nurse's) in jeopardy over "passing" vs. "handing over."
  7. 0
    OP, you did the right thing by not giving the resident the medication, but you should have given it back to the nurse,
  8. 0
    I would give them but we can give meds as long as we don't pass meds. In my scope I can even pop the meds out of the bubble sheet and give them but not at my facility.
  9. 0
    I had a nurse in the hall I worked on during day shift, and he tried to leave a medicine cup with crushed up meds/apple sauce on each breakfast tray for me to give to all the patients I had. I didn't even notice them the first (and last) time he tried to pull that on me, and started collecting the trays to put them back into the metal meal tray cart. He asked me about them as I was pushing the cart away, and I said what med cups? I didn't notice any.... (He had been reading magazines in a patient's room the whole time breakfast was being served). He said, "You're supposed to make sure they take those with breakfast." I politely told him that I cannot pass medications, and he never tried that crap with me again. He frantically had to go through each tray and read the name to match with the med cup so he could get them to the Residents on time.

    Hey nurses, I know 99% of you are awesome. The good ones have my respect. To the minority of you that think this kind of behavior is ok, it's not..
  10. 0
    I've seen a lot of these in LTC.If nurses are busy they just put the medicine cup on the tray and that's automatic that cna's have to give it to the patient.Well,maybe they have trust their cna's on that case esp when they know them already..It was happened at one time when the nurse put the medicine cup on the patient's tray but the patient went to sleep and forgot to take it.The next day all nurses were called up by the administrator because the dietary supervisor found the medicine on the tray.I understand that it's very busy in the morning esp when there is admission and its time to pass meds but relying on the patient or cna's is not safe thing to do.


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