Night shift Med/Surg CNA advice!

  1. 0
    Though I have been certified for two years, this is my first CNA job. (Been stuck in retail) I start Orientation March 4th.. I have no hospital experience as my clinicals were in a LTC facility. I'm in nursing school, so I'm going to be working the night shift! I just want some advice as to what the floor will be like and any tips
  2. Get our hottest student topics delivered to your inbox.

  3. 6 Comments so far...

  4. 1
    Expect to be very busy, and remember that you are a CNA at work- not a nursing student. Most nursing students make excellent CNAs, but there are a few who spend their time trying to figure out why a patient's potassium level is low when they should be bathing the patient.
    There are excellent learning opportunities in acute care, just make sure the time is available before you indulge. Congratulations on finding your first hospital job, btw.
    funtimes likes this.
  5. 0
    Quote from Orange Tree
    Congratulations on finding your first hospital job, btw.
    Thank you lol i will definately try not to over analyze my pt's!
  6. 1
    Happy for u... I also got a CNA job at a hospital and start orientation on April 11th very nervous had my CNA license for 2 years and been stuck in Retail too. So definitely keep us posted as how all goes & good luck 😊
    proudcna likes this.
  7. 3
    Quote from Orange Tree
    Expect to be very busy, and remember that you are a CNA at work- not a nursing student. Most nursing students make excellent CNAs, but there are a few who spend their time trying to figure out why a patient's potassium level is low when they should be bathing the patient.
    I had to laugh when I read this one, so true.

    I love when I get a report from a float pool CNA/nursing student, and they are going on about the patient's medical history and what tests are ordered and what meds they are on blah blah, and you got like 15 more patients to go and call lights are already going off, so finally I have to interrupt them and say ok, how do they ambulate? Can they feed themselves? Incontinent? When was the last time they were repositioned? Ok good...NEXT.
    alexis_xoxo, havehope, and Orange Tree like this.
  8. 0
    I love working nights (7p-7a) because I usually have pockets of time when I can study (I work PRN so I usually only work 2-3 shifts every 6 weeks). It really helps to cluster your care so you're not in the room every hour when they're trying to sleep. I work at a peds hospital so my schedule may be different than for adults. For me, it's: 2000 vitals (for q4h vitals), I&Os, and daily weights for those who require it (I do those closer to 2100 since that's 'officially' when they're due), 0000 vitals for everybody, and 0400 for q4h vitals. For babies who are nursing/feeding more often, I can get I&Os and wet diapers when I go in at 0000 and 0400. Otherwise, the bigger kids sleep all night. I usually have at least 1 who is vomiting (requiring bed changes and bathing, although most parents bathe their child). Other things include turning q2h, emptying foleys/drains, and changing diapers/feeding babies whose parents aren't staying over. I empty all the trash cans and try to empty all the linen carts in the rooms as well. A couple of the night nurses are awesome in that they let me help when they do things like catheters, IVs, NG flushes, etc. Some nights are busy -- we'll have several admissions -- but other nights are really slow.

    Good luck with your new position!
  9. 0
    Quote from Orange Tree
    Expect to be very busy, and remember that you are a CNA at work- not a nursing student. Most nursing students make excellent CNAs, but there are a few who spend their time trying to figure out why a patient's potassium level is low when they should be bathing the patient.
    There are excellent learning opportunities in acute care, just make sure the time is available before you indulge. Congratulations on finding your first hospital job, btw.
    This is great advice. I sometimes struggle with this. I'm always triaging in my head when I need to focus on the task at hand.


Top