I'm a CNA, not a MAID. - page 2

I've been looking for jobs, and these places want CNA's to cook, do laundry, clean, and drive people places. Um.. maybe I got this wrong, but I dont remember learning any of these things during my... Read More

  1. Visit  tomc5555 profile page
    0
    Quote from otilika
    I hear you! Right now I am about to end my first job as a CNA, in home care. I realized I am not very fond of home care especially because you have to deal also with the client's family, and that's a daily thing. So I ended up also dusting, taking the garbage to the dump, filling up the bird feeder, sweeping the floors and other things that weren't on my job description. Did I think that was right? No. But I wanted a job to start with, and I was trying to get good references after my first job, so I kind of put up with it and did the work, knowing that I won't be doing this forever. Once you get some experience on your resume, it will be much easier to move on and do something you actually like. (I worked for an agency and made $11/hour.)

    PS: I forgot to mention that the client's wife also used me as a therapist, when she would get overwhelmed and needed to vent (she'd start blaming me for everything that's bad). Also, I was expected to come up with games and activities to entertain her husband; so here we are- me put in the position of an occupational therapist.
    So sorry...Ugh...
    Hope you find something soon.
  2. Visit  Darkstar1485 profile page
    0
    Quote from momtojosh
    I am a LPN doing ALL that!!
    I work in a house with 12 medically frail individuals...this is THERE home...they cannot clean,cook or do their laundry...
    1) I hope you are not working alone. If you are, you're clearly being taken advantage of.

    2) I'm sure you are not getting paid $7.50 per hour.

    3) Good luck to your son.
  3. Visit  Darkstar1485 profile page
    0
    Quote from otilika
    I hear you! Right now I am about to end my first job as a CNA, in home care. I realized I am not very fond of home care especially because you have to deal also with the client's family, and that's a daily thing. So I ended up also dusting, taking the garbage to the dump, filling up the bird feeder, sweeping the floors and other things that weren't on my job description. Did I think that was right? No. But I wanted a job to start with, and I was trying to get good references after my first job, so I kind of put up with it and did the work, knowing that I won't be doing this forever. Once you get some experience on your resume, it will be much easier to move on and do something you actually like. (I worked for an agency and made $11/hour.)

    PS: I forgot to mention that the client's wife also used me as a therapist, when she would get overwhelmed and needed to vent (she'd start blaming me for everything that's bad). Also, I was expected to come up with games and activities to entertain her husband; so here we are- me put in the position of an occupational therapist.
    I've been a CNA for a year to gain exp. I wanted to do home care bc I like 1 to 1 but some of these families are really trying to take advantage. I'd be worried that they didnt really know what they were doing. That's just me though. Best of luck to you. You are making the best of a stressful situation and I commend you for that.
  4. Visit  Darkstar1485 profile page
    0
    BTW, im loving these responses. keep them coming! :heartbeat
  5. Visit  Darkstar1485 profile page
    0
    Quote from tomc5555
    I have friends making $15 to $20 per hour to provide this type of care.

    Wow! Maybe its bc i live in florida.. It's so hard to find CNA jobs that pay well. Eh, I'm originally from NYC. It could be that I'm just spoiled (compensation wise).
  6. Visit  momtojosh profile page
    0
    no,the minimum on my shift is 4...but that wasnt my point...

    i do know a few LPNs that work home health and do all that though...granted they make more then minimum wage...
    but thats home health,thats what one does,CNA,and LPNs....

    thanks for the wishes for my son...he loved his clinical yesterday!
  7. Visit  funtimes profile page
    0
    I worked a couple years in a skilled nursing facility(nursing home) where the CNAs prepped, cooked and served meals, washed dishes, stocked food orders, did the residents laundry, and on evening and night shift had a list of housekeeping duties they had to complete. This is all in addition to doing all your CNA duties like dressing, toileting, turning, baths, ADLs, vitals, etc.

    They would usually put one aide in the kitchen all shift while the other aides took care of everything else. Needless to say turnover was ridiculously high, and working in the kitchen was by far the most stressful and difficult part of the job, we would fight over who had to do it that day. Try cooking meals for 24 people with different diets, and have everything hot and ready and served at the same time. Get one residents meal wrong, for instance you didnt puree one persons soup because it had mixed consistency and their diet specified they couldnt eat that, or serve something that didnt get up to temp, and you are fired.

    The aides that work at that place are Superaides.
    Last edit by funtimes on May 25, '12
  8. Visit  fuzzywuzzy profile page
    2
    I'm pretty sure that if I wanted to clean houses I could charge more than what a CNA makes, without having to do any meal prep or care. I have a friend that's self-employed as a cleaning lady and she makes decent money. So yeah, I think it's BS that you have to do all 3 duties for such low pay. But around here, home care is divided into 2 groups-- aides and companions. The aides are CNAs that only do care and the companions do the housework and stuff. They're not CNAs and they don't make as much money. They are billed as 2 separate services and neither group is railroaded into doing extra work.
    Darkstar1485 and momtojosh like this.
  9. Visit  momtojosh profile page
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    i hear you about housecleaning....my daughter did it for some people while going to school....she actually made out well....
    ya,,we have facilities that have seperate job duties as well...i think i would prefer to work for them..
  10. Visit  ALavallee profile page
    0
    Quote from fuzzywuzzy
    But around here, home care is divided into 2 groups-- aides and companions. The aides are CNAs that only do care and the companions do the housework and stuff. They're not CNAs and they don't make as much money. They are billed as 2 separate services and neither group is railroaded into doing extra work.
    Where I am at respite care is billed together and actually IS part of the CNA job description, and must be charted on the flowsheet.
  11. Visit  jjic3982 profile page
    0
    Quote from Darkstar1485
    I've been looking for jobs, and these places want CNA's to cook, do laundry, clean, and drive people places. Um.. maybe I got this wrong, but I dont remember learning any of these things during my CNA training. I REFUSE to clean your house, cook, or be your driver. If you want a cook, get a chef. If you want you house cleaned, get a housekeeper. If you want a driver.. well, you get where I'm going.. LOL.... just had to vent about that... i just get sick of people expecting CNA's to be servants.

    What do you think?
    If you don't prefer home care settings, you might want to consider an acute setting. In hospitals you will take vital signs and do little charting. HOWEVER, don't expect it to be any less infection control management because it is crucial in nursing.

    Around my area home care agencies always love to hire many CNA's. One reason is because it is not easy to find the perfect CNA for the resident (home care being very bonding and 1-on-1). This job is very rewarding, however might not be of most interest for prenursing students (although it is a great experience nevertheless).

    I love my job however I now understand the significance of being able to provide 1-on-1 care. You don't get to spend much time with one patient as you would like when you have 5 others to attend to. Some nursing homes assign 1 CNA to more than 6 patients.

    So before you go into hospitals, think carefully. Some people prefer and really enjoy home health care settings.
  12. Visit  fuzzywuzzy profile page
    2
    Quote from jjic3982

    I love my job however I now understand the significance of being able to provide 1-on-1 care. You don't get to spend much time with one patient as you would like when you have 5 others to attend to. Some nursing homes assign 1 CNA to more than 6 patients.
    I'm pretty sure ALL nursing homes assign more than 6 patients!
    MedChica and nursel56 like this.
  13. Visit  mindyfromcali profile page
    0
    I've worked in all three settings (acute, home, and long-term). I only had one job in home health. I was way overwhelmed as the client was very advanced in age and had a series of health problems I was not familiar with. My responsibilities were light housekeeping, help with ADLs, medication reminders and food preparation. The pay was fairly decent, but it was live-in. I wouldn't do live-in again just because there is nothing like sleeping in your own bed. I can't get good sleep when I feel responsible for someone else's well-being round the clock like that. More than anything it was just lonely.

    Long-term care wasn't easy. Others are right, you do end up with more than 6. Facilities I worked at, anywhere from 7 to 9 during day shift, 10-14 on pm or swing, 20 plus on night shift. I liked nights the best. In the facilities the closest we did to housekeeping was emptying out trashes into the main trash, and at the end of the day dumping the big bag of laundry. We didn't do much else besides specific to CNA besides passing and clearing meal trays. Not too bad at all, I'm actually trying to get back into LTC just because I do miss it.

    Acute care was my last job. I worked in a major metropolitan hospital. Trauma center. WAYYY different than the other two settings. We didn't do any housekeeping besides keeping garbage off the floors and keeping the rooms tidy as much as possible. All other cleaning including emptying the trash was the environmental services' job. We were responsible only for emptying the linen plastic bags into a designated room for laundry to pick up. I liked it, but the job can be very stressful. Long term care the patients are way more stable. It's not life or death every single day.

    Having worked all three, I liked LTC the best. The nurses are right there with you if you need them, as opposed to home health, which is a lot of liability in my opinion.

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