If you have a bad left shoulder, is being a CNA an option?

  1. 0
    Good day:

    Given the physical requirements of being a CNA, if you had tendinitis / bursitis in your left arm from the top of your shoulder to your elbow with very limited range of motion in that arm as well as being weak in that arm (what you can lift, pull, push, move), could you still be a good CNA, be hired, and do a good job?

    Thank you.
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  3. 5 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    Wow that is a tough one. I'd say in a hospital setting or LTC you probably would not do well in that kind of inviroment. It is a lot of Rolling a patient over. Any type of transfer requires good shoulders and arm strength. But the one glimmer of hope I think you have is Home Health Care. It is wonderful because they can set you up with clients that are independent of tranfers and can walk on their own extra. That i can see you doing and still becoming a wonderful CNA.
  5. 1
    As a disabled vet who was medically discharged for a bad left shoulder (I tore my glenoid labrum and had to have surgery, which did not fix the issues). I could easily do my job as a CNA. However, that isn't to say it did not hurt at times and that I didn't think "why am I here?". But it can be done, don't do it if you are going to injure your self more.
    I am going to nursing school (in the fall) now and I can definitely see my self having trouble with my shoulder but working out really helps. And you should work on your technique when you turn patients and lift them. Technique goes along way.
    pmabraham likes this.
  6. 0
    If you haven't already started treating with NSAIDs and either ice or heat (depending on if this is an acute flare up or a chronic issue) I would highly encourage it. The next thing to consider is some physical therapy to help increase your ROM and strength in the affected arm and they can also provide input on how to perform your duties without aggravating the shoulder in the future.
    I had my left shoulder surgically repaired (capsular shift for chronic subluxation) in the middle of my undergrad program in athletic training and I will have flare ups of tendonitis when I over do it and dont listen to my body. My course of action is what I mentioned above plus going to the gym and performing exercises I've learned over time.

    Hope some of this helps!
  7. 0
    Quote from KAR813
    If you haven't already started treating with NSAIDs and either ice or heat (depending on if this is an acute flare up or a chronic issue) I would highly encourage it. The next thing to consider is some physical therapy to help increase your ROM and strength in the affected arm and they can also provide input on how to perform your duties without aggravating the shoulder in the future.
    I had my left shoulder surgically repaired (capsular shift for chronic subluxation) in the middle of my undergrad program in athletic training and I will have flare ups of tendonitis when I over do it and dont listen to my body. My course of action is what I mentioned above plus going to the gym and performing exercises I've learned over time.

    Hope some of this helps!
    As someone else that suffers degenerative arthritis in my shoulder secondary to injuries sustained as a tech, this is great advice. Motrin and hot packs have been great to help me get through the day to day. When my pain and mobility get really bad, physical therapy has been helpful. Occasionally when my symptoms are severe I have done steroids, but I try to avoid it.

    One thing my physical therapist did that helped me out a lot the last time I had a flare was acupuncture. I was skeptical, but my symptoms improved greatly with two sessions and I was able to avoid steroids.

    Good luck!
  8. 0
    Thank you everyone for sharing their thoughts and experiences.

    Due to taking Nexium for so many years, my liver and kidneys are damaged (my liver almost stopped producing bile) so taking NSAIDs would cause additional damage. Though, I'm taking Intenzyme Forte (20 to 30 per day on an empty stomach; 10 at a time), and Legaplex I(2 per meal; six a day) as natural supplements -- naturopathic / homeopathic -- which is doing the same end result of NAIDs without causing further damage to my digestive system. Of note, the naturopathic method takes longer; it took about 10 days before they really started helping; but the benefit is that no systems are damaged.

    Thank you for suggesting acupuncture. Also, has anyone with these or similar issues tried a chiropractor? If yes, how did that work out?

    kplp1111, thank you for your service to our country. I agree on technique (though I still need to learn that part extensively).

    Thank you all again.


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