How do you deal with these patients/residents?

  1. 1
    I had one elderly lady that would not let me do ANYTHING for her. That included bath, vitals, eating, etc. I couldn't even tell if the woman was incontient because she demanded I not touch her or she'd slap/hit me. What do you do? I don't want to just say I couldn't check her every two hours because she refused. I feel like a horrible CNA doing that. Also, she would not eat NOTHING all day for me. She refused saying "all I want to do is sleep". When i'm unable to do these kinds of things I feel that i'm not doing my job and I feel awful about not being able to do things for her. Anyone have ANY advice? Anything would be appreciated.

    I've only been working as a part time CNA since late June and this is the first time I've ran into this situation.

    Thank you!
    Last edit by havehope on Jul 17, '12
    Joe V likes this.
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  3. 4 Comments so far...

  4. 2
    Quote from havehope
    I had one old lady that would not let me do ANYTHING for her. That included bath, vitals, eating, etc. I couldn't even tell if the woman was incontient because she demanded I not touch her or she'd slap/hit me. What do you do? I don't want to just say I couldn't check her every two hours because she refused. I feel like a horrible CNA doing that. Also, she would not eat NOTHING all day for me. She refused saying "all I want to do is sleep". When i'm unable to do these kinds of things I feel that i'm not doing my job and I feel awful about not being able to do things for her. Anyone have ANY advice? Anything would be appreciated.

    I've only been working as a part time CNA since late June and this is the first time I've ran into this situation.

    Thank you!
    Report this to the nurse, ASAP.
    Report these types of issues immediately, you don't want residents to decline due to neglect.
    Ask other CNA's what is effective in working with difficult resident(s).

    By the way, I would refrain from calling a resident an old lady.

    Good luck.
    mstearns09 and spectrabrite like this.
  5. 1
    I would bring a buddy CNA in there with you every time or the nurse if possible. Documentation is not emphasized enough. Preferrably bring a CNA in who is very familiar with the resident and how to deal with their behaviors. Sometimes they act out when they have someone new they don't know. In my experience that's usually the case, or they probably didn't get a certain med on time.
    nguyency77 likes this.
  6. 1
    i come across this frequently where i work, i would advisefinding another cna and doing care on her together and report these things asthey happen to the charge nurse so that she can come and assess the situationand advise you on what you should do and so she can document it. also make surethat it gets documented on your charts, many times these things come up becausethey need their meds adjusted and without documentation their physician willnot see any need to adjust them. this is something that we all deal with, ihave been working as a cna for over four years and to this day i feel like ihave not done my job when these things happen even though it’s out of my control.though it is tough it’s a good learning experience just hang in there .
    nicerubio likes this.
  7. 0
    Quote from mindyfromcali
    I would bring a buddy CNA in there with you every time or the nurse if possible. Documentation is not emphasized enough. Preferrably bring a CNA in who is very familiar with the resident and how to deal with their behaviors. Sometimes they act out when they have someone new they don't know. In my experience that's usually the case, or they probably didn't get a certain med on time.
    I agree; definitely try getting another person to go with you after you tell the nurse about it. Most nurses would try to convince the resident to bathe/eat/etc. But, I have worked with some nurses who will just shrug and say, "Their choice." Residents' rights are the most important but sometimes it's just best to try. Don't just give up on bathing or feeding them.

    Given the reputation of LTC's, what are you going to do when the family walks in unannounced and the resident tells them your staff has been neglecting her? First and foremost, your priority is that she gets the care she may need. Second, you have to protect yourself and your nurse. Documentation will make or break you...


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