How to deal with staff who seem to not care for paitents

  1. 0
    I'm a student in school for nursing of course. But I'm taking a summer class to become a CNA so I can work during the school year. Our clinicals are at a CCU nursing home. I noticed that the CNAs that actually work there( and some nurses) are rude to the patients. Some of my classmates and I have witnessed and heard the employees saying they won't do things like help a resident off the floor because they've already done it once or they snatch call lights from patients who accidentally press the button. We notify our teacher and she says to mind our business, she'll handle it. I don't feel comfortable seeing these things take place. Is there more I could/should do??????

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  2. 15 Comments...

  3. 2
    I think it's pretty normal, sadly. You can report them and you can say something, but unless they are abusive they're probably not losing their jobs. It's hard to retain good CNAs because the job is very hard work for very tiny amounts of money, which obviously also doesn't help morale at all. At least 90% of the CNAs I worked with in the hospital when I was a CNA were burned out. Not all of them showed it to the patients - some still provided excellent care, others didn't - but it's just about impossible to stay upbeat and perky on some floors. CNA work is just too hard, too underappreciated, and undercompensated. It wears you down unbelievably fast.
    loriangel14 and mintygirl like this.
  4. 2
    I agree that there are a lot of burned out CNAs and nurses. On the other hand, I do think it's appropriate to "bend" standards of care on occasion. For example, I've had patients call and want to sit in their chair, then call five minutes later and want to get back in bed, then repeat those two steps about twenty times. At some point, you've got to set limits so you can take care of your other patients. A casual observer might think I'm being a jerk by "ignoring" the patient's 21st request, though.
    The call light issue is a tricky one, too. If a patient is repeatedly hitting the button and doesn't need anything or even realize what they're doing, it's not really functioning as it's intended to. If the patient's needs are met and the patient can be safely observed, it's not always a bad idea to put the light aside and give them a box of tissues to play with, instead. Again, it allows you to take care of the rest of your patients without the constant interruption.
    As far as people who just don't care, I wish I had a solution, but I don't.
    Missingyou and IrishErin like this.
  5. 1
    Sorry to disagree with you Pangea, but you can't remove a callbell from a pt's grasp regardless of their constant nuisance usage. It has to be avail for pt use - what if they have a legitimate need of an emergent nature and couldn't call for help???

    I've seen call bells looped over the bed headboards, on a siderail on a paralyzed pt''s bad side, or just inches out of reach of the pt. Done delilberately at times but also done absent-mindedly too. On incident reports when a fall occurs, there is usually a question that asks "was callbell in reach"? It has to be answered!!! Callbells rank right up there with siderails and proper footwear when a fall occurs! I have had to discipline staff for its absence when a pt falls.

    I have seen where State surveyors have identified lack of callbell presence when they've done surveys. Frequently some places will have spare callbells avail for emergency use replacements, or have those old ding-ding tap bells for pt use. That's how crucial some places regard callbell availability. And they must provide special alternative type alarms if nec.

    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

    To OP - it may be true that some staff may become burned out and/or seem less emotional when providing care to pts. NHs are demanding places to work for CNAs and nurses too. It's very difficult to provide the one-on-one type attention that many pts seem to need or want. You can only do your best to meet what their perceived needs are and then it's time to move on to the next pt.

    That's part of time management and priortorizing. You can't keep fluffing the pts. Kind of reminds me of toddlers having tantrums - you have to set limits and continue on. Doesn't sound pleasant but that's the reality to be firm and say no.
    Missingyou likes this.
  6. 0
    Thanks for your comments. It's really helpful getting the opinions of those who more experienced in this. Thanks again������
  7. 0
    Quote from amoLucia
    Sorry to disagree with you Pangea, but you can't remove a callbell from a pt's grasp regardless of their constant nuisance usage. It has to be avail for pt use - what if they have a legitimate need of an emergent nature and couldn't call for help???

    I've seen call bells looped over the bed headboards, on a siderail on a paralyzed pt''s bad side, or just inches out of reach of the pt. Done delilberately at times but also done absent-mindedly too. On incident reports when a fall occurs, there is usually a question that asks "was callbell in reach"? It has to be answered!!! Callbells rank right up there with siderails and proper footwear when a fall occurs! I have had to discipline staff for its absence when a pt falls.

    I have seen where State surveyors have identified lack of callbell presence when they've done surveys. Frequently some places will have spare callbells avail for emergency use replacements, or have those old ding-ding tap bells for pt use. That's how crucial some places regard callbell availability. And they must provide special alternative type alarms if nec.
    I'm not talking about "nuisance" patients who know what they're doing, I'm talking about patients who don't know what a call bell is and don't know how to use it when they need help...patients who look surprised when you show up because they don't see the connection. And yes, I know all of the rules, but I don't always follow the rules when they don't make sense.
  8. 0
    Quote from JessicaSamunique
    I'm a student in school for nursing of course. But I'm taking a summer class to become a CNA so I can work during the school year. Our clinicals are at a CCU nursing home. I noticed that the CNAs that actually work there( and some nurses) are rude to the patients. Some of my classmates and I have witnessed and heard the employees saying they won't do things like help a resident off the floor because they've already done it once or they snatch call lights from patients who accidentally press the button. We notify our teacher and she says to mind our business, she'll handle it. I don't feel comfortable seeing these things take place. Is there more I could/should do??????
    I think you're just not comfortable with CNA's being firm to patients. That's not to say that maybe your suspicions are wrong, but just wait until your a CNA. If you still see the same thing happening then I'd just do the obvious and report it, inform the pt that they can call Omnibuds for their rights and advocate patient rights.
  9. 1
    Quote from Pangea Reunited
    I'm not talking about "nuisance" patients who know what they're doing, I'm talking about patients who don't know what a call bell is and don't know how to use it when they need help...patients who look surprised when you show up because they don't see the connection. And yes, I know all of the rules, but I don't always follow the rules when they don't make sense.
    Please don't get in trouble for callbells!!! They still have to be within reach. Even with comatose pts who may have to have a halleluah (sp?) recovery in order to use it !!

    I have seen dementia pts have rare breakthrough episodes of lucidity & orientation. And it would probably be then during those periods that they would fall. I agree with you that there are some things that just don't make sense and what would be the most realistic & reasonable approach can't be done because of some silly rule.

    That's what makes our jobs so frustrating at times. And it's probably that frustration showing through when OP sees employees at their wits' end. I've dealt with those kind of pts who are 'clueless in Seattle'.
    Your idea to give them something for distraction is right on. But you may just have to grin & bear it re the callbell use.
    psu_213 likes this.
  10. 1
    They have those apron things with all the zippers and buttons for patients that need something to play with. I agree, though, that a lot of people get burned out.
    Glycerine82 likes this.
  11. 0
    This seems to be all too common at the facility where I work and it makes me sad. I understand that it's a stressful job, but the least you could do is show the residents some respect and kindness. That could be your family member, or even you later down the line. The way I try and deal with it is by not being like them; just because they don't care about the residents doesn't mean I have to be the same way. Also, I think if something is bad enough, you should report it.


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