Hospital or LTC? Other options? - page 3

by supermo 4,155 Views | 27 Comments

hi e'erbody! :wavey: :w00t: cnas rule!!:w00t: i'm a cna. :rotfl: anyway, i have only been a cna since nov 05 and i don't have much experience. i was wondering if some of you wonderful people could tell me about... Read More


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    Quote from shlru0404
    i agree to some extent about acute care over ltc, but still think ltc offers stable caregiver to patient relationship and is more rewarding.

    good thing to each is own, blessings in your adventures!
    I agree. It all depends on the type of care that you want to provide. When I graduate in May, I hope to get into an ER. I still really enjoyed providing care for the residents in the nursing home I worked for, but there was just too much to do to the point that I felt that I could not give the care that I think they deserved. That's one of the reasons that I left. I also am very interested in emergency care. I am already a member of the Emergency Nurses Association.

    LTC is rewarding, Hospital is rewarding...Caring is rewarding!
  2. 0
    Supermo:
    Have you ever thought of working for a registry? It would allow you to try out different sections of a hospita as well as different positions that a CNA cna work in. I have never worked Long Term Care LTC so I don't know if it would be any different to SNF/AL. The job of CNA's is different in all the states so find out what is allowed for you to work and give it a shot. All the Best in your schooling.
  3. 0
    I have worked in LTC for the past 7 years. There's alot of ups and downs to the job, especially in a nursing home!! The upside would be that I'm trying to make each day for the resident, a good one. The downside being death. It's true, you get attached to people in LTC, and when they die it's so sad, but I try to think of the good times we had with them, making each day count:spin: . I have flip-flopped with ideas of going to a hospital setting, but when it came down to it, I have too many residents that I'm attached too. In the long run, it'll be sad when they go, but I know we had a ball while they were still with us. In LTC you work your butt off for low pay, but the rewards are there if you can see the end of the tunnel.
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    thank you, thank you, thanks you! your recommendations have pretty much sealed the idea to do hospital work vs LTC. do hospitals pay ANY basic benefits so i don't have to live off my spouse?
  5. 0
    Quote from islamujeres
    thank you, thank you, thanks you! your recommendations have pretty much sealed the idea to do hospital work vs LTC. do hospitals pay ANY basic benefits so i don't have to live off my spouse?

    Depends on the type of position (FT,PT,PRN,etc.), but yes, hospitals have benefits.
  6. 0
    Quote from Winston95Pi
    Supermo:
    Have you ever thought of working for a registry? It would allow you to try out different sections of a hospita as well as different positions that a CNA cna work in. I have never worked Long Term Care LTC so I don't know if it would be any different to SNF/AL. The job of CNA's is different in all the states so find out what is allowed for you to work and give it a shot. All the Best in your schooling.
    I truly don't even know what my options are. I thought that home health and registry type stuff required more experience than I have. (5 months) :trout:
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    I work in the ED at the local hospital. I LOVE it!!! I stock rooms, do vitals, transport patients, do EKG's, assist the nurses and doctors in procedures (I have seen some really cool things done such as lacerations sewed, boils I&D'd, intubations, I have done compressions on patients that have coded, etc). If you love the fast paced life, the ED is for you!! I work extremely hard most days, however we do get days where we are bored to death because we never know what will or won't walk in the door.

    Enjoy life, it is the only one you will ever get!!!
  8. 0
    Quote from supermo
    I truly don't even know what my options are. I thought that home health and registry type stuff required more experience than I have. (5 months) :trout:
    From what I have seen of home health is it depends on the company. It seems that most good companies look for at least a year of experience, but I've seen them require anywhere from 1-2 years depending on the company. Registry jobs all seem to want the same. This also might vary on the state and what HHAs legally can and can't do.

    Although one of the local companies claims no experience necissary. They'll train their PCA's. Their pay is absolutely horrible. Minnesota State job site allows people to post resumes and if employers are intrested they'll call. I was looking at changing jobs so I had my resume posted. Needless to say I got a call from this company. No "Would you like to come in for an interview." instead I got "Want to come in for orientation?" I was able to talk startting pay out of her and it was $8.50. I declined the offer.

    Also if you're not interested in LTC look into something like a transitional care unit or possibly subacute for those people who've just been discharged from the hospital and aren't quite ready to go home yet. There are some freestanding TCUs otherwise a lot of larger nursing homes have TCU units.
    Last edit by casi on Aug 21, '06


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