drowning in fear and criticism

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    hey all..i am still on my practicum,less than two weeks away from finishing.i have just been informed by my instructor that i am "on the fence" as far as passing!!i was doing quite well at the other place we were at...and at this hospital[extended care]i have regressed and just can't seem to get in the groove!trust me it is being noticed.we are always reminded that this is a working"inteview" and that we are always being evaluated[.i have been told i fiddle fart with the residents,talk too much,and ask to many questions and am not just taking charge and being organized.the staff is nice but....although helpful you can tell that they are critical and our intructor has a build up/then tear down thing going down i have been complimented by my instructor on my care,listening,communication and intuition and caring...just not my time and my organization!!!!i really want this!!tips and advice please,i have to kick some but tommorow!!thank youenguin:
    Last edit by jb2u on Oct 19, '06 : Reason: fixed color
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    I'd say take your instructors advice..."I have been complimented by my instructor on my care,listening,communication and intuition and caring...just not my time and my organization!"

    It seems you already have your "must work on list." Yes, spending time with the residents is a wonderful part of the job, BUT we are there to assist the nurses first and foremost! Try to "keep the residents conversation on track." I know how they can talk for hours about their lives and yes it is amazing to hear their stories, but if this gets in the way of pt care then there is a problem. Try to tell them "I'll come back to talk with you as soon as I can, but I have to get these vital signs (etc) to the nurses" or volunteer on your days off to assist with bingo or whatever activity is going on that day. That is what my LTC facility did.

    If you really want this, you can have it, just take your instructors advice and organize your day as best you can (ie: baths at 0600, v/s at 0800, baths at 1000, etc..) and try to cut down on the talking. I wish you the best of luck.

    Sincerely,
    Jay
    Last edit by jb2u on Oct 19, '06 : Reason: spelling error
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    I think you have already answered your own question...get organized and learn to manage your time better. Without these skills, the job will eat you alive! You can't move fast, unless you are organized and if you can't keep up with the big dogs, they are going to tear you down worse than your instructor... too many of the CNA's that I have trained have ended up getting fired...why, because they can't keep up and they do sloppy work! And when my boss asks me how they are doing, I tell them the truth...they don't have what it takes to work here. The job isn't all about being liked by your residents, its a plus, but being efficient is MORE important. Once you get your first job you will realize that I'm not being snooty...CNA'a work short all the time and organization and time managment are 2 essential skills to get them through the day. Good luck!
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    ditto to all the sound advice above.
    I try to have "brains on paper" to keep me on track. Fine tune your schedule, and the people side will take care of itself.
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    Quote from followyourbliss
    hey all..i am still on my practicum,less than two weeks away from finishing.i have just been informed by my instructor that i am "on the fence" as far as passing!!i was doing quite well at the other place we were at...and at this hospital[extended care]i have regressed and just can't seem to get in the groove!trust me it is being noticed.we are always reminded that this is a working"inteview" and that we are always being evaluated[.i have been told i fiddle fart with the residents,talk too much,and ask to many questions and am not just taking charge and being organized.the staff is nice but....although helpful you can tell that they are critical and our intructor has a build up/then tear down thing going down i have been complimented by my instructor on my care,listening,communication and intuition and caring...just not my time and my organization!!!!i really want this!!tips and advice please,i have to kick some but tommorow!!thank youenguin:
    i had the same thing happen to me when i became a nursing assistant. during my clinical, i was told that i was too busy socializing with the aide i was shadowing, but what was actually happening is that i was asking him how he handled certain cases. he was really a friendly guy, making me feel at ease with jokes and made the day easier. i wound up passing everything, though. it does take organization and time management, though, because there are other patients sitting in their own poo while waiting for the cna or nurse to arrive for care. it is okay...you will learn as you do. explain to your clinical instructor that you will try and improve, and also ask her at the end of the day how you are doing.
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    Thanks for the support...I guess it is also the combination of wanting SO badly to be done and able to work and also the fear of being released "to the wild" on our own!For me personally i have never blossomed with people watching me,criticizing,knowing we are on a one month"working eval"I do much better when I have some space.To be honest I am the type that is quite nervous with new situations and my anxiety gets the better of me,I also need to ignore all the strong energy from the staff.Part of me is waiting for the "groove" to kick in.The other girls are srtuggling with the instructor as well,i have 10 days left so i keep reminding myself that getting up at 5 am is slowly ending.Anyways I hope all is going well with yourself,take care
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    Quote from chadash
    ditto to all the sound advice above.
    I try to have "brains on paper" to keep me on track. Fine tune your schedule, and the people side will take care of itself.
    I am going to try this advice as well. I know what I need to do in a shift, and then I enter a room and this resident wants to talk! This is my biggest problem, I want to sit and hear them and talk with them. I truely do. I almost feel rude moving on. I know how to end the conversation with the resident, and am working on that, just moving on when the care/need has been met. It is just, well almost heartbreaking. Some residents are sooooo forlorn, and I just want to be the one that puts a smile on their face. Some of them won't even remember me the next time I am with them, but I will remember that moment.
    As an additional thought, my nursing instructor has said that some of the nurses from her era have noticed a change in pt/resident to nurse ratio, there is less time to devote to our bedside manner.
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    My best advice to you at this point is not to get involved in conversation. Some will talk your ear off if you let them, but you can't. Whatever you do, don't sit down or stop moving to talk to them. Kepp doing your job while you carry on the conversation. When you are done, they will know its time for you to go and most of the time will get the hint to end the conversation. If you have to inch your way to the door telling them you'll be back later 10 times on the way, do it! They know you are busy and you don't mean to be rude...well, most of them do It takes some time, but you'll learn to keep the heart to hearts short and maintain your relationship with the residents at the same time. Good luck with your last few days. I'm sure you wil do great!
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    I struggle with walking out on the pts when they are talking to me. I really dont want to spend time socializing, I want to get going! But I dont want to hurt their feelings. Is there a polite way to break the discussion? any tips?
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    Quote from chadash
    I struggle with walking out on the pts when they are talking to me. I really dont want to spend time socializing, I want to get going! But I dont want to hurt their feelings. Is there a polite way to break the discussion? any tips?
    As another poster mentioned, conversate while you are working and terminate when the job is done. It may sound cold, but, I have let patients know that I also have to address the needs of other clients, and will be passing back and forth, in case they need something. They can be really needy, and this is not a criticism, just stating the facts. Facts also are that you need to build time management, or the work will never be done. The worst thing that can happen is the next shift coming behind you and seeing that things were not done. This is where the cut-throating begins. They will report it to the supervisors, and then, you may really have to worry about your job. I know that they teach compassion and to spend time with the patients, but that is the textbook. Reality does not allow such time.


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