CNA tryin to be RN!!!

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    i am currently a cna and have been trying to get into rn school for three semesters now. i am finding it is extremely competitive! i am maxed out on the points i can get on the application and done with all my pre-requisites. so basically i am just sitting around until i am accepted! i have been thinking of applying for lpn school and then going from that to an lpn to rn program. i heard lpn school is less competitive to get into. so, after much rambling.... i am wondering, does anyone think there is an advantage or disadvantage to going the lpn route or should i just hold out for going straight into rn school? also, i hear that most teachers advise not to have a job in nursing school because it is impossible to do well because of the workload. i have the option to live at home while in school or move out, and i would prefer to move out but am worried about the stress of paying bills, affecting nursing school performance. is it too much to handle??
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    LPN to RN has advantages and disadvantages.

    If you can go straight to RN, I think that is always best, but putting your life on hold while you wait for a spot in an RN program that may not even happen for a year or two is NOT the best use of your time.

    Going the LPN to RN route will give you a sound background when you go back to get your RN, but you may develop bad habits and find RN school more difficult or you may try to answer questions based on how it works in the "real world" where as nursing school is all about the "text book" way of doing things. This may cause you to answer questions incorrectly and lead to a difficult time passing unless you learn to "rethink" your way of thinking.

    The great thing about nursing is you can "customize" your career. Some people do LPN-RN-MSN-FNP, some do LPN-RN, some do ADN-BSN, some go straingt to BSN or MSN. The choice is YOURS!! Good luck with whichever route you decide to go. Do not forget to enjoy every moment. As far as working and nursing school, some people can some people can not. It all depends on what type of student YOU are. Some people spend 8 hours a day and fail nursing school and others study 4 hours a week and make all A's.

    Sincerely,
    Jay
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    I've got a similar dilemma--and I'm finding the LPN route very appealing. Everyone keeps saying "Well be sure you don't stop, get that RN license"...or "..JUST AN LPN..." (i hate that line...LPNing IS respectable, despite what people may tell you!)...Since I want to be an L&D nurse at some point, I WILL do all I can to become an RN, since LPNs aren't generally used in L&D. And in the mean time maybe get some experience in a related area. It's alot of thinking (I currently have a million things running through my head about all the options involved with nursing!) But you will make the right decision...but personally I'm all for LPNing first! There's not a thing wrong with taking that route!
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    I can totally understand where u r coming from! I can't decide whether I shoud become an LPN or RN...I got a notice in Feb that I didn't get into RN school but can & will try again for the following year. They just don't have enough nursing school to meet all the applicant's. Try working as a CNA to get some experience & it pays decent and they will possibly pay for you to get your LPN or RN. That is what I am doing. Hope this helps you.
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    I'm going the LPN route since I want to start working right away and gain some experience..like another poster said, I don't want to put life on hold while waiting forever to get into an RN program. I will be getting certified as a nursing assistant this summer, then apply to LPN school, hopefully get in, then work on my pre-reqs for RN school. The reason I want to advance to RN is because I want to get into pediatrics. But who knows, maybe I'll change my mind and end up loving LTC!
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    I think going for your LPN is a good idea, if you can't get into RN school right away. Like the above posters have said, there are pros and cons. I certainly would not want to hang around doing nothing while waiting for an RN spot.


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