CNA TO LPN

  1. I am going to school to get my CNA soon then I want tot go to be a LPN how do you go about doing that? If you did that how was it? How long did it take?
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  2. Visit Callie Martinez profile page

    About Callie Martinez

    Joined: Nov '10; Posts: 35; Likes: 4

    5 Comments

  3. by   mamayogibear
    Hello,
    That is my plan as well! I was going to become an RN right off the bat but since I have two kids I can not spend four years in school before getting a job. I start a CNA course in January and then I hope to start a LPN program in Spring term (April) but might not start until Fall since I'm only able to get on the waitlist once I get my CNA cert.
    IT really depends on the school you want to go to. Some LPN programs only require a few prereqs like A&P, Intro to Chem, General Math, English and Psych which can be completed in one stressful term. Other programs have different prereqs so I'd check with your school if I were you. Prehaps you can complete some of your pre reqs while taking the CNA course.
    There are some schools that are competitive entry into LPN programs (I don't have any in my area but I know there out there) and others have waitlists like the two I'm planning on applying to.
    Good luck in your adventure in becoming a nurse!
  4. by   duke4470
    I currently work as a CNA...but, my plan is to go into a straight RN program...then get my BSN. Reason? In 2015, everything is going to change. LVN's (or LPN's) are going to become obsolete. They are going to require all current LPN's/LVN's to get their RN...and all RN's to get their BSN.
  5. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from duke4470
    I currently work as a CNA...but, my plan is to go into a straight RN program...then get my BSN. Reason? In 2015, everything is going to change. LVN's (or LPN's) are going to become obsolete. They are going to require all current LPN's/LVN's to get their RN...and all RN's to get their BSN.
    The American Nurses Association first proposed the phasing-out of LPNs in 1965, more than 45 years ago. It has not happened, and it will not happen anytime soon. Certain settings (hospice, LTC, home health, private duty, clinics, doctors offices, etc.). do not want to pay the money for an all-RN staff.

    North Dakota has been the only state to even attempt to force all RNs to earn their BSN degree. Guess what happened? A mass exodus of nurses left the state, and North Dakota had to quickly repeal this rule. At the present time, less than 40 percent of all RNs are educated at the BSN level or beyond, and there are not enough BSN programs in the country to get all RN/ADNs graduated with a BSN.

    Rumors are not even worth a grain of salt.
  6. by   SDALPN
    Quote from Callie Martinez
    I am going to school to get my CNA soon then I want tot go to be a LPN how do you go about doing that? If you did that how was it? How long did it take?
    Going back to the topic...
    I started as a CNA and became an LPN a few years later. I took the certification course for CNA and the LPN course at my local community college. They didn't do a waitlist. It was based on a number of things. But they gave a list of what they based it on. Each thing on the list was worth points and the ones with the highest number of points got in the program. I liked the school I went to. If I go back to school I would go back to that one. But I'm sure not all schools are the same and not everyone has the same experience. I was in school for 4 years. But I changed majors due to a health problem. Then I double majored in practical nursing and early childhood education. I knew I wanted to work in pediatrics and thought it would help. The pre-reqs took longer than I thought. It can be done in a year at the school I went to. But everything has to fall in place just perfect. Of course the classes I needed didn't always fit into a schedule that would work. Some classes overlapped etc. Then some classes were only offered once a year. I also took the pre-reqs for the RN program thinking I'd go right back in. But life didn't let me do that. So it took me a while to complete all of that. Lesson learned about pre-reqs...the school I went to makes you retake pre-reqs that are more than 5 years old. If I go back I'll have to do those over again. I think being a CNA and getting that experience really does help in school and once you get out. Go for the CNA first. When I started the program it made me less overwhelmed at first because I had the skills they were teaching first. I also had hands on patient experience which made me much more comfortable working with patients. From my experience I would also suggest trying to go for the RN program if you can. There are less opportunities as an LPN in some areas such as mine.

    Don't worry about those claiming rumors of LPN's becoming obsolete. As the other poster said, its been a rumor for many years. From my understanding there was talk of phasing out LPNs in the 70's and it still hasn't happened. It is true that Dr offices are saving money with MA's and hiring them more. Its also true that nursing homes are hiring med techs to pass meds so they won't need as many LPN's. But that doesn't mean they can go completely without LPN's. LPN's are still cheaper than RN's and money talks. Employers can hire 10 RNs @ 25/hr (random number...some make more, some make less). Or they can hire an RN at 25/hr to supervise and 9 LPNs at 20/hr and save 5/hr x 9 nurses. Thats enough money to make some employers keep LPN's around! Good luck with whatever you choose to do!
  7. by   newway
    My advice if you can swing it is to go straight for your RN. There are so many more opportunities for a RN as opposed to a LPN.

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