Cna then lvn advice pls

  1. 0
    Im a new member her and i need advice. Im currently taking CNA and my state exam will be on friday. I love to become lvn but im not lucky. Anybody can advice me what to do on my career? Pls share your ideas! Anyone?
    Last edit by VickyRN on Jan 19, '13
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  4. 0
    Go for it!! I'm an LPN in NY State and it's the best thing I ever did career-wise. Good luck!
  5. 2
    Quote from vanie29
    Im a new member her and i need advice. Im currently taking CNA and my state exam will be on friday. I love to become lvn but im not lucky. Anybody can advice me what to do on my career? Pls share your ideas! Anyone?
    I'm not sure what luck has to do with it. If you desire to become an LPN/LVN, enroll into a practical nursing program and pursue that career route. Good luck to you.
    Kandy83 and Twinkle007 like this.
  6. 0
    You could go for Lpn or take prereqs for an Rn program and do that, do what is best for you and according to your siuation hun and good luck.
  7. 0
    I have no faith in myself. Some people really pull me down. They said I couldn't do it cause its hard then I might fail it. I was thinking maybe they were right though. But my heart says I wanna be a nurse I'm a single mom and I need to support my child.
  8. 1
    *HUGS* The FIRST thing I hope you are able to do is gain confidence in yourself!!! You have real goals that are attainable, and you want to provide for your child. I hope to give some guidance to what paths are available to you, as a LPN and a new grad RN:


    If you want to be a nurse, you have a choice.

    LPN: usually a 12-13+month program (my program was 13 months)...usually no prerequisites required. Learning nursing care and theory under the scope of a Practical Nurse. After completion, sit for the NCLEX-PN. Once licensed, work with a limited scope of nursing practice-varies by state...for example as a LPN in PA, I was able to manage central lines as a IV therapy certified LPN...the only restriction was blood products, Nutrition through a central line, and chemo...the scope has broadened recently, as well...but again, depends on the state...also the facility. If you bridge or go the BSN route, prerequisites are needed.

    RN: Two year (Associate Degree Diploma/Hospital Based program) or or 4+ year (BSN) program. Encompasses prerequisites in Sciences, Mathematics, English Composition, and Arts and Humanities, including Philosophy, Ethics in 4 year program. Nursing care and Theory in the scope of a Registered Nurse, extends to Public Health, Research Nursing and Leadership Nursing in 4 year program. After completion, sit for the NCLEX-RN. After licensure scope covers LPN as well as chemo, blood products, assessment , leadership scope, etc. No nursing care limitations of practice.

    I was a LPN for 7 years. I am a new grad RN now, completed BSN program. I will say I did a lot if the nursing care that can encompass a nurse due to licensing and facility requirements of the areas I worked in...the BSN did strengthen the rationales of WHY this is essential to my practice, and helped me gain more strength in areas like critical care, leadership, Peds, public health, and helped me gain more knowledge in my assessment skills.

    I don't know your personal life path, however, I will suggest that you research the professional scopes of both LPN and RN from your states board of nursing. I also request you research you area on what NURSE they are hiring...I say this with caution, because of the current economic situation, which may change, however, the BSN will put you at an advantage for career and future prospects should you desire to further your education in the nursing field. I know LPNs in my area who are having a hard time getting a job because of the overstaturation of ADN's and BSNs, which if you have a BSN, more chances they want to talk to the person with the bachelors before ANYONE else. Just do your due diligence, choose from accredited schools from the AACN and the NLNAC (I think that's the agencies) and price shop...you may have to apply for financial aid, so be aware if tuition costs as an undergrad-there is a limit...also, shop around for post-graduate help, like volunteer programs, student loan repayment programs, if you get loans. Those programs are for RNs and up...you don't get much help with nursing scholarships and loan repayment as a LPN.
    Study hard, get help soon, join nursing groups early as a nursing student...they are a great source to help light the future's way. Make sure if available, take advantage of after school and daycare programs that will help with child care fees as well.

    So these are the suggestions that I have laid out for you...it is a process, if someone was able to do this for me 14 years ago, I may have been an RN BSN for 10 years, instead of LPN for 7, new grad for 7 months, I can't tell you if it would've made a difference...I've enjoyed the ride that my path has carved.It has made me a well rounded nurse and team member. From CNA, LPN, to RN, I really don't have ANY regrets.

    Good Luck!!
    Shay.jadore likes this.
  9. 0
    Quote from LadyFree28
    *HUGS* The FIRST thing I hope you are able to do is gain confidence in yourself!!! You have real goals that are attainable, and you want to provide for your child. I hope to give some guidance to what paths are available to you, as a LPN and a new grad RN:

    If you want to be a nurse, you have a choice.

    LPN: usually a 12-13+month program (my program was 13 months)...usually no prerequisites required. Learning nursing care and theory under the scope of a Practical Nurse. After completion, sit for the NCLEX-PN. Once licensed, work with a limited scope of nursing practice-varies by state...for example as a LPN in PA, I was able to manage central lines as a IV therapy certified LPN...the only restriction was blood products, Nutrition through a central line, and chemo...the scope has broadened recently, as well...but again, depends on the state...also the facility. If you bridge or go the BSN route, prerequisites are needed.

    RN: Two year (Associate Degree Diploma/Hospital Based program) or or 4+ year (BSN) program. Encompasses prerequisites in Sciences, Mathematics, English Composition, and Arts and Humanities, including Philosophy, Ethics in 4 year program. Nursing care and Theory in the scope of a Registered Nurse, extends to Public Health, Research Nursing and Leadership Nursing in 4 year program. After completion, sit for the NCLEX-RN. After licensure scope covers LPN as well as chemo, blood products, assessment , leadership scope, etc. No nursing care limitations of practice.

    I was a LPN for 7 years. I am a new grad RN now, completed BSN program. I will say I did a lot if the nursing care that can encompass a nurse due to licensing and facility requirements of the areas I worked in...the BSN did strengthen the rationales of WHY this is essential to my practice, and helped me gain more strength in areas like critical care, leadership, Peds, public health, and helped me gain more knowledge in my assessment skills.

    I don't know your personal life path, however, I will suggest that you research the professional scopes of both LPN and RN from your states board of nursing. I also request you research you area on what NURSE they are hiring...I say this with caution, because of the current economic situation, which may change, however, the BSN will put you at an advantage for career and future prospects should you desire to further your education in the nursing field. I know LPNs in my area who are having a hard time getting a job because of the overstaturation of ADN's and BSNs, which if you have a BSN, more chances they want to talk to the person with the bachelors before ANYONE else. Just do your due diligence, choose from accredited schools from the AACN and the NLNAC (I think that's the agencies) and price shop...you may have to apply for financial aid, so be aware if tuition costs as an undergrad-there is a limit...also, shop around for post-graduate help, like volunteer programs, student loan repayment programs, if you get loans. Those programs are for RNs and up...you don't get much help with nursing scholarships and loan repayment as a LPN.
    Study hard, get help soon, join nursing groups early as a nursing student...they are a great source to help light the future's way. Make sure if available, take advantage of after school and daycare programs that will help with child care fees as well.

    So these are the suggestions that I have laid out for you...it is a process, if someone was able to do this for me 14 years ago, I may have been an RN BSN for 10 years, instead of LPN for 7, new grad for 7 months, I can't tell you if it would've made a difference...I've enjoyed the ride that my path has carved.It has made me a well rounded nurse and team member. From CNA, LPN, to RN, I really don't have ANY regrets.

    Good Luck!!
    Hi how I wish I could do that. I'm 28 yrs old I don't think I can still do. My brain is stock already but I really wanna do LVN that's my greatest dream but I don't think that will happen. I'm unemployed in a while I only get help with my family. I research LVN around my area but its a waiting list I guess I'm gonna get old of waiting. I have no faith in myself. Good that you do all of these things to yourself I'm happy to hear that. Thank you for writing me
  10. 0
    Quote from vanie29
    Hi how I wish I could do that. I'm 28 yrs old I don't think I can still do. My brain is stock already but I really wanna do LVN that's my greatest dream but I don't think that will happen. I'm unemployed in a while I only get help with my family. I research LVN around my area but its a waiting list I guess I'm gonna get old of waiting. I have no faith in myself. Good that you do all of these things to yourself I'm happy to hear that. Thank you for writing me
    I'm still not sure I understand? You are only 28 but you think that is too old to get onto a waiting list for an LPN school?

    You can always go the RN route as well. There's community college ADN programs that do not have waiting lists, they go by your grades and test scores. Look around at different schools, I'm sure there's LPN programs with no waiting list either. If you want to become an LPN, then go for it. Nothing is stopping you if that is what you really want to become.
  11. 0
    Quote from x_factor

    I'm still not sure I understand? You are only 28 but you think that is too old to get onto a waiting list for an LPN school?

    You can always go the RN route as well. There's community college ADN programs that do not have waiting lists, they go by your grades and test scores. Look around at different schools, I'm sure there's LPN programs with no waiting list either. If you want to become an LPN, then go for it. Nothing is stopping you if that is what you really want to become.
    ^^^Agreed!!! My classes ranges from 20+ to 50+...if this is YOUR GOAL...you can do IT!!

    And btw, I'm 31...32 in May...I started nursing school in my mid twenties...everyone has a starting point...age has NOTHING to do with it.
  12. 0
    Thank you I'm looking for LVN here I'm in the area that luck of LVN but you have to pay in your own money which I don't have it. I apply 1 school they will start on June I need to take the teas or ati test though I don't know if I could make its kinda hard. I don't know what the study methods and my brain is stuck.


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