CNA or HHA

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    What is the difference between CNA and Home Health Aide? I just passed my CNA state exam but I got a job offer in home care. Need advice please
  2. 8 Comments so far...

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    I'm not sure about every other state, but here in CA it sucks. HHA and CNA are separate. HHA only takes a week, and CNA takes longer. Even though the training for the CNA is basically the same, it's a separate certification. Some schools offer the HHA as a package deal with the CNA, which is what I wish I would have done when I got my CNA. Best way to find out if you don't know, and you don't live in CA like I do is to go to the web site for your department of public health.
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    I live in Cali too. I got a job in home health though with my CNA license. I don't know if there is a specific job where you HAVE to have a HHA license, but I'd think if you have a CNA license you can get a home health job. That's how its been for me in Cali anyway.
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    Quote from cj_shima
    I live in Cali too. I got a job in home health though with my CNA license. I don't know if there is a specific job where you HAVE to have a HHA license, but I'd think if you have a CNA license you can get a home health job. That's how its been for me in Cali anyway.
    There are jobs where you have to have it. I work in home health currently as well, but have seen quite a few better-paying home health jobs that require the HHA.
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    Here in TN you don't need to be certified to be a HHA. If you have your CNA its a huge plus. They don't pay well and I personally couldn't constantly drive to all of my clients homes.. and paying for my own gas. I love being a CNA/PCT :3
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    I think the major difference is you won't be working in a facility, you will be working in a home and driving to each house to care for your patientS. One of my former classmates is an HHA now and she cooks, buys groceries/house supplies based on patient's set budget, and cleans in addition to the major duties of a CNA such as taking vitals, incontinent care, etc. My CNA program included training in long term care, acute care, and home health aide. Ask or search for a job description so you can know exactly what you will be expected to do.
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    Training is similar but not necessarily identical. The course material is approved by different State agencies. In New Jersey, CNAs receive their certification from the NJ Dept of Health, while HHAs receive their credentialing from the NJ Div of Consumer Affairs (our BON is under DCA). This happens AFTER they finish schooling and test.

    HHAs work in the home setting, that's the name HOME Health Aide. CNAs most frequently work in LTC facilities.

    NJ is a very regulated Sate and there are various education programs for CNAs & HHAs to help them cross-over the titles. Many aides have BOTH titles because that opens up more job opportunities.

    Hospitals like to hire CNAs because they already have some approved training. A lot of student nurses become CNAs so they can get some hospital work experiences AS AN AIDE, not a nurse.
    Last edit by amoLucia on Sep 24, '13
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    thank you all for your answers
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    I live in CA. I am a CNA. My advice is take to take the CNA class with the HHA included. If you wanna more job choices other than the very hard work in a nursing home. HHA cert opens you to get into Hospice care and Home care, many places require you have your HHA to do homecare from what I can tell. Best Advice I could give? go straight for RN if anyway possible. Just my 3cent!!!!


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