Certified Medication Aide

  1. 0 Is it true that CNA's can get certified as a medication aide? If so, how does one go about doing that? I'm taking a CNA course in July and I also like to be certified in dispensing medication. Does anyone know of any programs in Chicago/South Suburbs Illinois who offer this?

    TIA
  2. Visit  DESTINED 2B NURSE profile page

    About DESTINED 2B NURSE

    40 Years Old; Joined Apr '08; Posts: 28; Likes: 3.

    24 Comments so far...

  3. Visit  TheCommuter profile page
    1
    I am in Texas, and certified medication aides are extremely common here, especially in the nursing homes and assisted living facilities. In Texas, a certified medication aide is an experienced CNA who has completed a 4 to 6 month course that covers proper medication administration.
    DESTINED 2B NURSE likes this.
  4. Visit  DESTINED 2B NURSE profile page
    0
    Quote from TheCommuter
    I am in Texas, and certified medication aides are extremely common here, especially in the nursing homes and assisted living facilities. In Texas, a certified medication aide is an experienced CNA who has completed a 4 to 6 month course that covers proper medication administration.

    Thank you for responding. I have googled "certified medication aide programs in, Chicago, Illinois and nothing turned up. I'll keep looking and asking around, until I find some answers here in Illinois. Until then, I'll focus on completing this class and gaining experience!

    Thanks again,

    D2BN
  5. Visit  MarieFutureRN profile page
    1
    I had to take a different class. It cost an extra 65 dollars. It was suppose to last 4 hours but was completed in about 30 minutes. What the instrutor goes over is common sense. Hope it goes well.
    DESTINED 2B NURSE likes this.
  6. Visit  s_le2006 profile page
    1
    try qualified medication aide (QMA). Thats what they call it indiana.
    DESTINED 2B NURSE likes this.
  7. Visit  littlebitark profile page
    1
    It's new here in my part of Arkansas- one must be a CNA at least a year- classes here are for one sememster and meets all day on Fridays-
    Most nursing homes are taking the wait and see approach before they are using them- Nurses are not at all happy about medication aids- I'm still deciding if I want to go that route or not. But good luck to you
    DESTINED 2B NURSE likes this.
  8. Visit  MarieFutureRN profile page
    2
    Wow for some reason here in florida our CNA classes are only for 1 week. Maybe its because the abundance of older people that we have. It seems like medtechs are welcomed here. Good luck to you as well.
  9. Visit  asoonernurse profile page
    1
    Hey, Commuter.

    Never heard of this before, so I Googled it. Looks to me like they are further trying to erode the role of LVNs.

    If they can pay CMAs less than they do LVNs to do essentially the bulk of what most LVNs do in LTC, then why staff LVNs?

    What's your take on this?

    Best Regards,

    Michael

    Quote from TheCommuter
    I am in Texas, and certified medication aides are extremely common here, especially in the nursing homes and assisted living facilities. In Texas, a certified medication aide is an experienced CNA who has completed a 4 to 6 month course that covers proper medication administration.
    lindarn likes this.
  10. Visit  egglady profile page
    2
    Please, do NOT ever confuse a CMA ( medication aid) with a LPN ( Licensed Practical Nurse). One is a nurse, one isnt. There really is soooo much more to passing meds than just spooning them in.
    lindarn and txspadequeenRN like this.
  11. Visit  asoonernurse profile page
    0
    True. But I wasn't confusing them.

    My question still stands. IF LTC facilities begin to use CMA's to pass meds, how will that affect LVNs.

    I'm assuming not positively. So, the question I posed to The Commuter I pose to you Egglady;

    "If they can pay CMAs less than they do LVNs to do essentially the bulk of what most LVNs do in LTC, then why staff LVNs?"

    Regards,

    Michael

    Quote from egglady
    Please, do NOT ever confuse a CMA ( medication aid) with a LPN ( Licensed Practical Nurse). One is a nurse, one isnt. There really is soooo much more to passing meds than just spooning them in.
  12. Visit  egglady profile page
    1
    Like I said before, there is SO much more to "passing meds" then just spooning them in. You have to know the meds, the possible side effects, the assessing before giving meds. This list goes on and on. Would a med aid have any idea what to do if the patient had an adverse reaction? Would they know to hold a med if vs not stable- such as a pulse at 48- would they still just spoon on in some dig? If a blood sugar was low would they still give insulin? If a B/p was low would they know to hold certain meds? Then would they know to call the doc, and to reassess? I dont think they would. I am not bashing them, I am just saying that a 4 hour course just doesnt cut it for safe med admin. I know where I am at, there are more LPN on staff than RN. It is a budget thing. As long as there is an RN in the building or on call, then they get by with all LPN's. They would not be able to do that with med aids. Plus, I dont think ( I am not positive) med aids can give narcs, or anything invasive. So, it would seem that they would need a nurse anyways....
    KimberlyRN89 likes this.
  13. Visit  joolia profile page
    2
    You might want to ask the school that is givign your CNA class. At mine, they offer the passing meds class for an extra $20. It is a 4 hour course. I am taking it Saturday, so I can let you know what it is like.

    From my understanding, becoming a med tech does not in any way replace what an LPN does. It allows you to be able to do stuff like hand-out asprin and routine rx. Assessments, and hading out more complex meds (insulin, bp, narcotics, etc.) still is the function of a nurse. I don't think it is necessarily something one would consider as a career alternative to an LPN. More like a resume padder for a CNA.
  14. Visit  pagandeva2000 profile page
    0
    I do think that having CMAs decreases the value of LPNs, or nurses. But, the issue I would have with it is that if a mistake is made, who is ultimately responsible for that error, the medication aide or the licensed nurse on duty? I used to be a certified AMAP when working in psych, and we dispensed oral medications. They taught us a bit, but nothing in comparison to my training as a nurse. And, I do remember that when we made errors, the nurses would go wild. Later, they took it away from the aides and gave it back to the nurses. If they are going to take the ultimate responsibility for their errors, meaning that they face their own board, then, I would feel more comfortable.


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