can anyone tell me the difference?

  1. I start my CNA classes on the 23rd at a nursing home.Originally I was to start at a hospital(were I hope to be working after the test)and learn everything from there so I can work at one.But that didn't fall through and I was told I had to take it at the nursing home.What I was wanting to know was if there was a difference between them?Will I learn what I need to know to work in a hospital?If any one could please let know before I start.It would be very helpful....Thank you!!!
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  2. 5 Comments

  3. by   lovingtheunloved
    Quote from daisygal
    I start my CNA classes on the 23rd at a nursing home.Originally I was to start at a hospital(were I hope to be working after the test)and learn everything from there so I can work at one.But that didn't fall through and I was told I had to take it at the nursing home.What I was wanting to know was if there was a difference between them?Will I learn what I need to know to work in a hospital?If any one could please let know before I start.It would be very helpful....Thank you!!!


    I don't know how it works at the NH you're talking about, but the one I work at shells out more than $20,000 a month for the CNA class, so it burns me when people take the class there and immediately quit and go to the hospital. I find it wrong to use the facility like that and then not even work there. Keep in mind that unless you're paying for your training, (which you don't in most nursing homes) you have some obligation to work for said NH for at least some amount of time. As a preceptor, I don't want to waste my time training someone who has no intention of using the training to care for the residents who let you practice on them. People don't think of that when they sign up for the class.
  4. by   Gooselove
    CNA's in hospitals have totally differant routines, and duties then a Nursing Home.
  5. by   daisygal
    I understand why it would make you mad having people take CNA class at a NH and never stay.But when your told from the college for almost a year now(it was for a PCT class)there aren't enough people to do the class and THEY also tell you to go to the redcross what else can you do?The NH you work at can't be to mad with people taking their classes there and leaving if they keep giving the classes. I think as long as finish my classes and like what I do and the people I help it doesn't matter were I go to school or were I work. :wink2:
  6. by   lovingtheunloved
    Quote from daisygal
    I understand why it would make you mad having people take CNA class at a NH and never stay.But when your told from the college for almost a year now(it was for a PCT class)there aren't enough people to do the class and THEY also tell you to go to the redcross what else can you do?The NH you work at can't be to mad with people taking their classes there and leaving if they keep giving the classes. I think as long as finish my classes and like what I do and the people I help it doesn't matter were I go to school or were I work. :wink2:
    If the particular nursing home you're talking about doesn't mind, great. My facility asks, but doesn't require students to stay at least a year after the class. It certainly does matter.
  7. by   bethin
    Quote from daisygal
    I start my CNA classes on the 23rd at a nursing home.Originally I was to start at a hospital(were I hope to be working after the test)and learn everything from there so I can work at one.But that didn't fall through and I was told I had to take it at the nursing home.What I was wanting to know was if there was a difference between them?Will I learn what I need to know to work in a hospital?If any one could please let know before I start.It would be very helpful....Thank you!!!
    Completely different. Now, I don't know how your program and facility is set up. When I took my classes in a LTC facility, we checked off on bp, pulses, temps, etc. Never did I do any of them. We learned ambulation and turning pts mostly. Also, in the hospital, you will learn about checking for blood in stool, urinalysis, taking bp's with a machine, blood sugars and loads more. But don't worry, I didn't know any of this until I went to the hospital. You learn as you go. Ask if you don't know how to do something. If you've peed in a cup then you know how to explain to a pt how to do it. Blood sugars vary by facility.

    Some of my duties:

    blood sugars, prepping pts for surgery: getting bonnet and footies, removing any jewelry and dentures. I take BP every shift unless they are on a telemetry unit (heart monitor) then they get BP every 4 hours. I take specimens down to lab. I can remove IV's and catheters. Those are not hard and I did not learn that in my CNA classes. For catheters, ask a nurse for a 10cc syringe and hook it to the port and pull back. Tell the pt to relax and pull out. It doesn't hurt. You will hold down babies and children who need IV's started. I am happy working in a hospital. I see much more than if I worked in LTC. I like keeping busy.

    Don't worry, I see nurses who have been working for 15 years and ask questions.

    Blood sugars below 60 (at least in our hospital, check your future hospitals policy) need orange juice with 2 reg sugars added. You will be part of codes. Mostly running to get stuff, but I have bagged a pt before.

    You learn as you go. Don't ever ever be afraid to ask questions if you have doubts. You are there for the pt and if it incoviences a nurse, so be it. You have one priority: to keep the patients alive. If you are planning on going on and becoming a nurse this is a great place to start. I have learned so much about medications.

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