Best way to get a hospital job as CNA?

  1. 0
    I don't mind working in nursing homes but I would really like to work in hospitals to gain clinical experience (which, I don't think nursing home experience counts as clinical) and to serve a variety of patients. I was wondering if there was anything I should become certified in that could help me get into a hospital? I know about Acute CNA and CPR of coarse, but aren't there others? Also, what exactly is the difference between CPR and BLS? Aren't they the same things? If you were certified in CPR couldn't you also say you are BLS certified? I checked the list of requirements for some of the hospitals in my area and they say "BLS certified" and whenever I look up BLS classes in my area CPR classes are pretty much the only things that pop up. Could a CNA get certified in AHA, PALS, and ACLS, if they wanted too as well? I would like to try for those but I am not sure if I can if I am only a CNA.

    Also, for those of you who are CNAs working in hospitals, what did you do before you got the position? Did you work at a nursing home then transer into a hospital? Or did you go strait from certification to working in a hospital? Did you ever work through a registry or agency? Did you volunteer first and get the job that way?

    A little more details: I would like to become either a Neonatal(any level), labor and delivery, or ER nurse in the future and I was hoping my experience as a CNA could go on my resume in the future.

    Thank you!
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  3. 8 Comments so far...

  4. 2
    Quote from magichospital
    I don't mind working in nursing homes but I would really like to work in hospitals to gain clinical experience (which, I don't think nursing home experience counts as clinical) and to serve a variety of patients. I was wondering if there was anything I should become certified in that could help me get into a hospital? I know about Acute CNA and CPR of coarse, but aren't there others? Also, what exactly is the difference between CPR and BLS? Aren't they the same things? If you were certified in CPR couldn't you also say you are BLS certified? I checked the list of requirements for some of the hospitals in my area and they say "BLS certified" and whenever I look up BLS classes in my area CPR classes are pretty much the only things that pop up. Could a CNA get certified in AHA, PALS, and ACLS, if they wanted too as well? I would like to try for those but I am not sure if I can if I am only a CNA.

    Also, for those of you who are CNAs working in hospitals, what did you do before you got the position? Did you work at a nursing home then transer into a hospital? Or did you go strait from certification to working in a hospital? Did you ever work through a registry or agency? Did you volunteer first and get the job that way?

    A little more details: I would like to become either a Neonatal(any level), labor and delivery, or ER nurse in the future and I was hoping my experience as a CNA could go on my resume in the future.

    Thank you!
    I don't know about every hospital, but the one in our town will hire any qualified CNA, but there are usually very few openings. As you can imagine, those positions are not open very often! LTC experience would surely be of benefit but I really don't think you would absolutely need it to be qualified. Healthcare provider CPR is BLS (Basic Life Support). I'm not sure about the ACLS and PALS but I think anyone can take those courses. And PLEASE don't ever refer to yourself as "only a CNA"! You are a very valuable member of our team!

    Good luck getting into a hospital job and don't give up. Many hospitals use CNA's in the ER and L&D so you may get lucky and get your wish.
    gcc8 and magichospital like this.
  5. 1
    I worked in ltc for 9 months before I started my job at the hospital.I put in a application every 2 months.I was on my 4th application before I finally landed a job interview at one of the biggest hospitals in my area.I think what really made me stand out was my resume.On my 4th application I decided to upload a resume stating what I can do and I also wrote a paragrah on why I decided to become a cna.I think thats what got me the interview.I work on the pulmonary floor at my hospital and alot of people do not stay on that unit because they think its too hard.But I love a challenge.My advice to you is upload a resume and update your application every 2 months.Good Luck!!
    magichospital likes this.
  6. 1
    I recently acquired a "casual" position as a housekeeper/EVS associate, and worked in that dept for a month, to gain general hospital knowledge and get my foot in the door. I began applying for full-time CNA jobs and got an offer in my 1st interview, I start the CNA job tomorrow. There was no probationary period (ie. 3 or 6 mos) because I was "casual/on call" status. Maybe you could try something like this? or maybe sign up for a pt transport position? Best of luck!
    magichospital likes this.
  7. 1
    I started in a hospital right off the bat, I think I got lucky though as many new CNAs have a hard time getting hired in the hospital. Make sure you put on your resume that you're going for nursing, a lot of hospitals like that.

    Remember though as a CNA in a hospital you'll still have to do "dirty work". Our hospital uses CNA's in the ER but they almost always want at least a year of experience, and our hospital doesn't use CNA's in L&D. You'll most likely be working with an older population doing a lot of nursing home type stuff anyway. Not to discourage you, I love working in the hospital and you definitely learn a lot more and get to do a lot more than in a nursing home, but there is still your fair share of 'dirty' work.
    magichospital likes this.
  8. 1
    I worked in LTC care for three years before I joined a hospital. I have my BLS from the AHA. At my hospital a CNA can take ACLS or PALS but where I work it is pointless because we do not read strips during a code and are never allowed to medicate anyone. During a code where I work a CNA does compressions so a BLS class works out fine.
    magichospital likes this.
  9. 1
    The difference between CPR and BLS: CPR is through the American Red Cross and BLS is through the American Heart Association. Hospitals in my area will only accept BLS. I have taken both and CPR is generally not as in depth or as strict as BLS. If you have an area health education center they will usually offer these class or maybe you could call the local hospital to find out where their employees get certified.
    magichospital likes this.
  10. 0
    Thank you for the responses so far I have another question in that case then:Anybody know any good sites where I can look at examples of resumes? I have a few decent basic resumes but I think I would do better if I got some ideas from some really great resumes. Also, if I am applying to a hospital, do I need a cover letter or would that be too much? Thanks once again for the help!
  11. 1
    I am pretty sure that careerbuilders has a place on their site to look at resumes. The hospitals in my area use online applicaitons only and they have a copy and paste box for the resume and a cover letter but it does say that either are not required but they are recommended.
    magichospital likes this.


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