be kind to your CNAs - page 2

I want to appologize ahead of time. This is mostly a vent really. I have worked with 2 different nurses (besides the regular nurses on my floor, the past 2 weeks. One was a traveler and one has... Read More

  1. by   chadash
    The issues of mutual respect and teamwork really are at the core of good patient care. I think if we all stay focused on our common purpose, giving the patients the best we have, we will naturally see the value of everyones contribution to this end.
    I think it is the responsibility of the management to actively encourage this attitude, and to also have no tolerance for childish and counter productive actions.
    It is not about us, it is all about our patients.
    Last edit by chadash on Sep 23, '06
  2. by   chadash
    Quote from chadash
    The issues of mutual respect and teamwork really are at the core of good patient care. I think if we all stay focused on our common purpose, giving the patients the best we have, we will naturally see the value of everyone's contribution to this end.
    I think it is the responsibility of the management to actively encourage this attitude, and to also have no tolerance for childish and counter productive actions.
    It is not about us, it is all about our patients.

    please excuse my grammar problems tonight!
  3. by   ptadvocate81
    I understand your frustration. I work nights as a nurse tech as well, and Lord willing, will be graduating nursing school in December. I have found that respect has to be earned and you have to prove that you know what you are doing. It shouldn't be that way, but that is life. I do get frustrated however, with the new graduates every year that come to work where I do. I have been working there about 3 years and know most policies & procedures, so when I take something to one of these new grads and tell them that I will help them with something and they say that it isn't necessary I just smile. Because, just like the other night, they will come to me in a few hours AFTER they read the orders and realize that I was RIGHT and they now need my help. I am glad to help and forgive them for snubbing their noses at me because they are, after all just new grads... and in a few months I will join them, hopefully not in their nose snubbing, but in their ignorance anyhow. Don't allow other people to control your emotions- you are in control and after all, some people are just convinced after a while that they were BORN RNs and the rest of us are beneath them... Congrats on your graduation, good luck on Boards, and kudos for your commitment to make the techs and CNA's lives better that will work with you in the future.
  4. by   gretchengirl
    Before I became a CNAII with med license,I went to college for 4 yrs and got a teachers cert to teach special needs children. I decided I wanted a job change and went back and became a CNA II with med license. While in class for this, some of the student nurses who were also in the same area at the college called us "WANNABES" I am what I WANNABE and dont care to go back to school for anything. I have worked for the state for 22 yrs and can retire in 3 yrs at the ripe old age of 48. so why would I wanna go back to school? My teaching degree took longer to get than what some of those nurse students had to do to get their degree.
    recently there was a write up in one of the papers here about a CNA II who saved a patients life in the er.THe reporter who wrote it stated one place in the article that the person was a CNAII and then later on he referred to them as a RN. Man let me tell you the editoral page was FULL 2 days later from RN's complaining that he referred to a CNAII as a RN. Big deal.! The whole point of the original writeup was this person saved a life. Who cares what the persons degree is. The fact was a life was saved. But it sure ruffeled alot of RN's feathers.
  5. by   pagandeva2000
    One thing to look at is even when you move up the nursing career ladder, you may find that the LPNs are mistreated by the Associate Degree RN, then there are the BSNs looking down on the Associate degree nurses and so on. It really doesn't stop as you move up...it is the character of the person, not so much the position. I recently became an LPN and some of the CNAs told me that they wished that they could be one as well because they would gain respect. However, when I told some of them that I am also being disregarded, they find it hard to believe.

    What has happened in my case at times is that I now have responsibility to give medications to many patients and that if they are not given out or if there is a mistake in the administration of the medications, then, I am accountable. A medication mistake can kill a client, and if you are a new nurse, your attention is more on assuring that you administer safely. I had a CNA ask me to help her to bathe a person, and I had to say that I could not because I knew that it may take more than a half an hour to do it and then I would have been behind in passing meds. I told her that I would come and help her to move the patient when it was time, but then, I asked another aide to assist her. The aide that I asked to assist told me that she was NOT going to help and then, the first one told me that I forgot that I was once an aide. It was not that...I had an RN that was going to mistreat me in the same way, because she felt that my job is now to medicate. Sometimes, it is the hierarcy that makes things so rough. The RN told us ALL that she was going to write the aides up for not assisting each other, and me because I was going to be late passing out the medications. Go figure....

    I am not saying these things to make up excuses for the rude nurses that mistreat ancillary staff. I do believe that we have to respect THE TEAM and the talents and responsibilities that they carry. What I am trying to explain is that in some cases, there may be something else that is going on where the nurse may want to assist, but actually can't at times, because of his/her responsibilities can be a deterrent. And, that as one may rise up the nursing ladder, the mistreatment, (sad to say) does NOT always change...it is just that some of the behavior happens behind the closed doors between the nurses and the aides may not see it all. It can be really bad on all ends, believe me.
    Last edit by pagandeva2000 on Sep 30, '06
  6. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from gretchengirl
    Before I became a CNAII with med license,I went to college for 4 yrs and got a teachers cert to teach special needs children. I decided I wanted a job change and went back and became a CNA II with med license. While in class for this, some of the student nurses who were also in the same area at the college called us "WANNABES" I am what I WANNABE and dont care to go back to school for anything. I have worked for the state for 22 yrs and can retire in 3 yrs at the ripe old age of 48. so why would I wanna go back to school? My teaching degree took longer to get than what some of those nurse students had to do to get their degree.
    recently there was a write up in one of the papers here about a CNA II who saved a patients life in the er.THe reporter who wrote it stated one place in the article that the person was a CNAII and then later on he referred to them as a RN. Man let me tell you the editoral page was FULL 2 days later from RN's complaining that he referred to a CNAII as a RN. Big deal.! The whole point of the original writeup was this person saved a life. Who cares what the persons degree is. The fact was a life was saved. But it sure ruffeled alot of RN's feathers.
    I am curious, what is a CNAII? And do you live in the United States? I ask this because I hear that there are so many new titles under the CNA umbrella, and it is very interesting. Way to go...
  7. by   gretchengirl
    Yes I live in the u.s and a level II does alot more stuff than just level I. We do alot of caths and dressing changes where I work.
  8. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from gretchengirl
    Yes I live in the u.s and a level II does alot more stuff than just level I. We do alot of caths and dressing changes where I work.
    That is nice. Do you draw blood, also?
  9. by   AuntieRN
    I understand that sometimes the nurses are wayyyy to busy to help out and thats not a big deal...but...when you get a nurse like the one I was refering to who is sitting there reading a book and she flat out refuses to help you with one of her patients especially when the pts safety is at stake then that is absolutely unacceptable.
  10. by   gretchengirl
    When I worked at the state mental hosp. All staff took self defence classes every 6 months. I worked high control and most of the patients we had had some type of charge against them. ( murder, assalt etc) There was one nurse who worked the ward with us who was afraid of the patients. Because of her, one of the staff got hurt really bad in a fight and was left partial paralyzed. This nurse was rather big. ( 5'8 200 lbs) and would have been alot of help in a fight if she would not have went and hid in the bathroom ever time there was a fight. I am only 4'10 and weigh 110 lbs but I never ran from a fight in all the yrs I worked there. After the big fight that left the staff member injured, there was a big meeting with all the staff on the ward and this one nurse who ran said that we shouldnt worry about the injured staff member because the state would take care of her the rest of her life. Needless to say, ALL respect for this nurse went out the window after she made that statement. ( she was the less liked staff member on the ward by staff and patients) She finally transfered off High control to a less violent ward.
  11. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from gretchengirl
    When I worked at the state mental hosp. All staff took self defence classes every 6 months. I worked high control and most of the patients we had had some type of charge against them. ( murder, assalt etc) There was one nurse who worked the ward with us who was afraid of the patients. Because of her, one of the staff got hurt really bad in a fight and was left partial paralyzed. This nurse was rather big. ( 5'8 200 lbs) and would have been alot of help in a fight if she would not have went and hid in the bathroom ever time there was a fight. I am only 4'10 and weigh 110 lbs but I never ran from a fight in all the yrs I worked there. After the big fight that left the staff member injured, there was a big meeting with all the staff on the ward and this one nurse who ran said that we shouldnt worry about the injured staff member because the state would take care of her the rest of her life. Needless to say, ALL respect for this nurse went out the window after she made that statement. ( she was the less liked staff member on the ward by staff and patients) She finally transfered off High control to a less violent ward.
    She sounds like she would not be a safe nurse, anyway, and it was better that she transferred somewhere else. It is not fair to state that this partially paralyzed person because she will be taken care of...in fact, if that is how she felt, then, she should have stood in the line of fire so that she, too, could have been taken care of. What about the quality of life this staff member is currently experiencing and the loss of self esteem as well as income? What a disaster...
  12. by   melmiche
    I was going to start a thread that read something like "Nurse vs tech" and then I read this thread.. I think everyone here has valid points and I have a friend who was having a discussion with me where in nursing school she was actually told that nurses should distance themselves from their aides. She was told things like not to eat lunch with them etc.

    Now I am a CNA and a nursing student myself and actually have more expereince in the nursing field than her and my point is this. I think it creates alot if resentment when people over delegate (Yes it does happen) and it creates alot of resentment when the over delegation is brought to the forefront by the aide. Everyone here is working towards the good of the patient but I think it is terrible how because they have the RN or LPN behind their name that they should be considered better or more valuable. I have seen this happen and it is very frusterating. I understand the liability and responsibilty of the RN and their time constarints but the ratios are never as high as an aide's it would be considered unsafe.

    I did not write this to start a flame war but to gather opinions on if you have seen or heard about this situation?

    Thanks for reading!
    Last edit by melmiche on Nov 13, '06
  13. by   chadash
    I really dont mind that the nurses do not have lunch with me. I have to talk to them so much, asking questions and reporting stuff, that I am sure they need a break from interacting with me. That may be why, they just need some time to clear the ol' brain. I am an overboard extravert, but still need some quiet thought time myself.

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