UCLA Phasing Out CNS?

  1. Hi all: I wanted some perspective that I posted on a similar thread. I applied for a CNS position at UCLA and got an interesting callback from the nurse recruiter. They basically said that "I forwarded your profile onto the manager but I wanted to let you know that our chief nurse executive ordered a complete review and put all of our CNS positions on hold."

    Obviously, it's clear that CNS positions are being evaluated and likely eliminated. But, I'm wondering why not just throw my file in the trash and not give me a follow up call?

    Anyway, wondered if anyone else had any insight.

    Thanks,
    -Nick
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  2. 5 Comments

  3. by   juan de la cruz
    Where do you work now? I'm surprised a UC hospital would do that as the culture seems to be supportive of the CNS role.
  4. by   WineCountryRN
    As a Pediatric CNS, I know for a fact that PICU and Pediatric Units (and NICU too) that take CCS $ in California are required to have CNSs on staff. I was told this my the faculty member at UCSF who teaches courses for the APRN programs (this was in 2010).
    I really don't know about the role of adult CNS but I have seen job posting locally for acute care CNSs. I am sorry that you were misinformed.

    Here is a cut and paste from California Children's Services

    Regional NICU Clinical Nurse Specialist
    There shall be a minimum of one full-time equivalent clinical nurse specialist
    (CNS) for the Regional NICU.
    a.
    b. The Regional NICU CNS shall:
    1) be a R.N. licensed by the State of California;
    Issued. 111/99 Chapter 3.25.1 -11
    CALIFORNIA CHILDREN'S SERVICES MANUAL OF PROCEDURES
    Regional NICU Clinical Nurse Specialist

    There shall be a minimum of one full-time equivalent clinical nurse specialist
    (CNS) for the Regional NICU.
    a.
    b. The Regional NICU CNS shall:
    1) be a R.N. licensed by the State of California;
    Issued. 111/99 Chapter 3.25.1 -11
    CALIFORNIA CHILDREN'S SERVICES MANUAL OF PROCEDURES

    CHAPTER 3- PROVIDER STANDARDS Reaional NICU

    2) be certified by the State Board of Registered Nursing as a CNS, as per the
    California Business and Professions Code, Chapter 6, Section 2838 of the
    Nursing Practice Act;
    3) have at least three years of clinical experience in neonatal nursing care at
    least one of which shall have been in a facility with an NICU that is
    equivalent to a Regional or Community NICU;
    4) have current certification in Neonatal Intensive Care Nursing from a
    nationally recognized accrediting organization, i.e. the NCC; and
    5) have evidence of current successful completion of the Neonatal
    Resuscitation Program course of the AAP and AHA.
    Last edit by WineCountryRN on May 12 : Reason: additional information
  5. by   MurseJJ
    I'm curious, in California, CNSs don't have prescriptive/diagnostic authority right (correct me if I'm wrong)? I was reading about a UCSF CNS that works in the brain tumor center, and her bio says that she co-manages all brain tumor patients. If CNSs don't have prescriptive/diagnostic authority, I'm wondering what "co-managing" would entail?
  6. by   elkpark
    Quote from pennccrn
    Hi all: I wanted some perspective that I posted on a similar thread. I applied for a CNS position at UCLA and got an interesting callback from the nurse recruiter. They basically said that "I forwarded your profile onto the manager but I wanted to let you know that our chief nurse executive ordered a complete review and put all of our CNS positions on hold."

    Obviously, it's clear that CNS positions are being evaluated and likely eliminated. But, I'm wondering why not just throw my file in the trash and not give me a follow up call?

    Anyway, wondered if anyone else had any insight.

    Thanks,
    -Nick
    I'm just spitballing here, but I wonder if the call means that, although they are putting CNS positions on hold for now, they were impressed and interested enough by your application that they may want to try to find someplace to "fit you in," whether that might mean something other than a formal CNS position or getting clearance to hire for a CNS position. In any case, I would take it as a good sign (that they called about forwarding your profile rather than just filing it away -- hey, your application is still "alive"). Good luck!
  7. by   juan de la cruz
    Quote from MurseJJ
    I'm curious, in California, CNSs don't have prescriptive/diagnostic authority right (correct me if I'm wrong)? I was reading about a UCSF CNS that works in the brain tumor center, and her bio says that she co-manages all brain tumor patients. If CNSs don't have prescriptive/diagnostic authority, I'm wondering what "co-managing" would entail?
    CNS's don't have prescriptive authority but have an official designation that is recognized by the Board of Nursing as part of the APRN umbrella. The entire UC system of hospitals have a CNS job title with corresponding job description that is more aligned with the traditional specialty focused CNS role. While they don't prescribe (or furnish as NP's do here), they can make recommendations even in terms of medical management sometimes.

    While I'm not familiar with the particular CNS you mentioned, I can see how a role like that would work in a brain tumor program at UCSF without having a need for prescriptive authority. UCSF's Neurosurgery is highly specialized (as in various MD faculty experts for specific types of brain tumor and conditions). It's possible that a CNS is working with some of the faculty in their work as far as coordinating intake from referral sources, doing pre-op teaching, communicating with PCP's if additional tests are required, checking on post-op patients and making sure they're doing well, etc.

    These are not billable services per se but they do improve the quality of care patients receive and help improve overall outcomes for the patient making the hospital look good.

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