Phasing out CNS

  1. Is it true that the CNS degree is being phased out? It is attractive to me because it is 1) one of the four established APRN roles, 2) a clinical-based MSN and 3) one can practice as an NP in certain states with additional certification. A PMHCNS that I work with in acute inpatient psych told me "CNS is being phased out, don't get that degree." If anyone can please help me learn the validity of this, I'd appreciate it. Also, am I correct in my 3 bullets above? Thanks!
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  2. 25 Comments

  3. by   marigoldey
    Or, I guess I should say the CNS credential (not degree). The degree is an MSN.
  4. by   traumaRUs
    I'm an adult and peds CNS (two post-MSN certifications) and I would NEVER advise anyone to go the CNS route.

    The reasons are multiple:

    1. CNS IS an APRN role but has lost favor to the NP

    2. CNS is NOT accepted as APRN in ALL states

    3. If you are in a CNS role that is NOT APRN, you are not bringing in $$$ to your employer and your job could easily be on the chopping block.

    I've been a CNS for 10 years.
  5. by   elkpark
    The psych CNS credentials have already been eliminated. I don't know what's happening with the med-surg CNSs. I think this is a big loss for nursing. Once we're all gone, y'all will miss us.
  6. by   marigoldey
    Why are the CNSs being eliminated? Who is eliminating them, state BONs?
  7. by   meanmaryjean
    The LARGE hospital system I used to work for got rid of 90% of them- and the ones remaining have been turned into the 'bundle police'. Very sad.
  8. by   llg
    A lot of hospitals are not using them anymore -- substituting people with other focuses. For example, they'll hire Nursing Professional Development Specialists, and Quality Improvement Specialists, and Program Coordinators, Case Managers, Discharge Planners, Infection Control Specialists, Would Care Specialists, Pain Specialists, etc. ... for the types of jobs that CNS's used to do.

    I used to be a CNS a long, long time ago. But I switched to Nursing Professional Development back in 2001.
  9. by   SHGR
    I went to a wonderful CNS program, graduated, then was told by our CNO that "We are hiring CNL's now." The couple of CNS's who remain in that hospital system will not be replaced.

    In my PhD class yesterday, we did our initial intros and two others, like me, got their MSN's in CNS and have never worked as a CNS. We're all in other MSN roles. Education's been a good fit. But those trained as NP's have been working as NP's from day one.

    My main point here, is see what is being hired in your area. MSN can be versatile (NP's can work as educators, as well) but it is disappointing to have that dream CNS job never materialize, and a AGCNS credential that I will never use.
  10. by   traumaRUs
    I'm both an adult health CNS and peds CNS and both certifications are "retired" which is an absurdly stupid term as I must cont to work another 10 years.

    Nursing is a profession that had I to repeat myself would not do...should have stayed active duty!
  11. by   carolinapooh
    This is interesting as the current push in the Air Force is to use them more. I'll file this one away and have it handy the next time someone tries to push me along that track (because that's already happening).

    The Army is already using CNLs and started that about four years ago.
  12. by   PsychGuy
    Quote from carolinapooh
    This is interesting as the current push in the Air Force is to use them more. I'll file this one away and have it handy the next time someone tries to push me along that track (because that's already happening).

    The Army is already using CNLs and started that about four years ago.
    What's USAF doing with them?
  13. by   karnicurnc
    I am a neonatal CNS who graduated in May of last year. My hospital paid for me to go to school as the state requires a CNS in a Level III or higher NICU. I am 1 of 11 CNS's in my hospital (a large teaching/tertiary regional facility) and we are well-utilized in the system. I have received offers from other centers looking for a neonatal CNS, so maybe it depends on what your focus is on. I am lucky to have quite a bit of autonomy in my role, and for that I am grateful. When I went to school I was 1 of 2 neonatal CNS students and our plan of study was a hybrid - taking classes with NNP students and adult CNS students. This year that school opened up a dedicated neonatal CNS track.
  14. by   traumaRUs
    Thanks for the info - do you function as an APRN? If so how does that work with NNPs?

    Or do you do some other type of role?

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