Phasing out CNS Phasing out CNS - pg.2 | allnurses

Phasing out CNS - page 2

Is it true that the CNS degree is being phased out? It is attractive to me because it is 1) one of the four established APRN roles, 2) a clinical-based MSN and 3) one can practice as an NP in... Read More

  1. Visit  pennccrn profile page
    #13 0
    I wonder if the institution that got rid of the CNS positions was UCLA. I received a callback after I applied for a position there that the CNO was putting all CNS positions on hold. And that a market review was taking place. Just curious
  2. Visit  imenid37 profile page
    #14 4
    Don't do a CNS program if you are on the East Coast. I have had a nightmare with the BON. It is a great role,but has lost favour. I saw on another thread a discussion about ANCC exams. I think they have had quite a hand in the downfall of the role. They retire exams,but yet there are still accredited programs with students who will graduate with NO exam to take. They retired the CNS generalist exam a brief time because not enough people took it. It was out for perhaps two years. Maybe that is because so few people even knew about it. The fact that the CNL role was created and was given a name so close to CNS is also confusing to the public and healthcare executives who often live on sound bytes. The CNL role was created by guess who???? AACN!!! (not to be confused with ANCC!!!!) I have no problem with the role or the nurses in the role, but the name is confusing. It seems a lot of what has occurred lacks common sense.
    Last edit by imenid37 on Dec 26, '16
  3. Visit  traumaRUs profile page
    #15 2
    AMEN!!!!

    Couldn't have said it better....
  4. Visit  llg profile page
    #16 4
    I totally agree with the last 2 posts. Nursing leaders made a few decision back in the 1980's, 1990's, and beyond that weakened the CNS role to a large extent. I had been a CNS, but got out of it when I saw those decisions being made. It was a great role and one that should have been more supported. Sadly, it wasn't.

    When I talk with young nurses interested in that type of work now, I recommend they explore other roles -- such as CNL, Staff Development, or roles in Quality Management -- depending on their specific interests.
  5. Visit  msufan3710 profile page
    #17 5
    I was really sad when I finally figured out that this role is being phased out in my area. I was accepted into a highly ranked Adult/Gero CNS program and decided against it in favor for AGNP due to the poor desire for the CNS role in my area. I'm not even a CNS and I think it's a huge loss to our profession?
  6. Visit  MickyB-RN profile page
    #18 2
    I would have preferred to take a Psych CNS program and it is no longer. I will be going for Psych NP if accepted in April.
  7. Visit  WestCoastSunRN profile page
    #19 0
    Quote from llg
    I totally agree with the last 2 posts. Nursing leaders made a few decision back in the 1980's, 1990's, and beyond that weakened the CNS role to a large extent. I had been a CNS, but got out of it when I saw those decisions being made. It was a great role and one that should have been more supported. Sadly, it wasn't.

    When I talk with young nurses interested in that type of work now, I recommend they explore other roles -- such as CNL, Staff Development, or roles in Quality Management -- depending on their specific interests.
    Thank, llg. I, too, am sad to see this role going away -- and am really trying to figure out which direction I should take my graduate education. I've been a nurse for 20 years and I'm not done with bedside nursing yet, but am getting to the point of actively planning for the day when it would be good to transition from bedside to something a bit physically gentler but still challenging to my neurons! I DO like the idea of staff development, but I don't want to be away from patients. I've been thinking NP -- and maybe DNP so I can teach as well as practice -- I really think I'd like that. I have a passion to see our profession make the right moves in the near and distant future (and in some instances that is going to mean correcting the course). But currently I have no weight to throw behind that passion.
  8. Visit  llg profile page
    #20 1
    Quote from WestCoastSunRN
    I DO like the idea of staff development, but I don't want to be away from patients. I've been thinking NP -- and maybe DNP so I can teach as well as practice -- I really think I'd like that. I have a passion to see our profession make the right moves in the near and distant future (and in some instances that is going to mean correcting the course). But currently I have no weight to throw behind that passion.
    A lot of unit-based staff educators still get involved with the patients. They serve as consultants to the staff on difficult cases -- and as teacher/consultants/helpers to the newer staff members who are still learning. "Staff Development" doesn't have to mean leaving the clinical unit. Just so you know.
  9. Visit  WestCoastSunRN profile page
    #21 0
    Quote from llg
    A lot of unit-based staff educators still get involved with the patients. They serve as consultants to the staff on difficult cases -- and as teacher/consultants/helpers to the newer staff members who are still learning. "Staff Development" doesn't have to mean leaving the clinical unit. Just so you know.
    Thanks, llg. I do know this and think it could be an alternative to advanced practice for me. But I am confused about how to go about pursuing a role such as a unit-based/hospital educator. There seems to be a lot of new MSN degrees -- and I have trouble understanding to what end each leads. I am not interested in managerial roles. Any insight into this is appreciated!
  10. Visit  llg profile page
    #22 1
    You just have to start looking at individual schools and programs. Ask what types of jobs the graduates of each program/path end up taking?


    I'd start by looking at CNL programs ... and going from there. A lot of our unit-based educators have MSN's in Nursing Education at schools that included some content on staff education and/or allowed students to do practicums in staff education.

    Also, seek individuals who have roles that appeal to you who work in your region. Find out about their paths to those positions so that you'll know what the common expectations are in your region. Things vary a bit around the country.

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