Why would anyone do this? ACNP + CRNA - page 2

From Vanderbilt's Website...... Why would you need/want both? Donn C.... Read More

  1. by   dqbanrn
    The requirement for CRNA school is a year of acute care experience. It is up to the school to define what is acceptable experience. That is why some will accept ER experience or other areas besides the icu. What they are looking for is evidence the nurse understands hemodynamic monitoring, medication drips and real time management of the patient. They want to be sure the nurse can actively respond to changes in the patients status.
  2. by   coopsc1
    I have been doing some research on CRNA jobs and it seems like a lot of the management/chief CRNA spots want you to be ARNP/CRNA. This does not makes sense. I am not a CRNA (or a nurse yet for that matter) but it seems like they basically want you to be an MD. Is is common for CRNA's to also be a NP?
    Thanks
    SC
  3. by   MaleAPRN
    It is not common for a CRNA to be an NP at the same time. Most dual role APNs (NP/CRNA) are NPs first before becoming CRNAs. I should start a discussion board for dual role APNs to see how many out there are NP/CRNAs.

    Vince.
  4. by   Ventjock
    Quote from vinnysca
    It is not common for a CRNA to be an NP at the same time. Most dual role APNs (NP/CRNA) are NPs first before becoming CRNAs. I should start a discussion board for dual role APNs to see how many out there are NP/CRNAs.

    Vince.
    u should, im interested in seeing what they see as far as the pros and cons...

    especially when a CRNA/NP (or a AA/PA) may take 4 yrs to complete, excluding the 1-2yrs of experience requirement and what they see as their rationle of doing that route instead of the MD route in anesthesia.
  5. by   dfk
    i do concur about the website ragarding dual roles.. it can be rather informative and, who knows, could also promote it in other ways solely beneficial...
    i spoke with a new classmate today (srna) that was rather loquacious, and whole-heartedly warm about rather comforting things, i received a new insight about the dual role of NP-CRNA (or reverse for being unexpectedly PC) ..
    my response, albeit provocative, was solely and most respectedly, was to just graduate, then i don't give a deuce ! (as quoted so eloquently from Stewie).
  6. by   dqbanrn
    i am currently studying to become an acute care np. i intend to study anesthesia when i complete this. i chose this route becuase this degree wil basically provide me with a masters degree in the prerequisite (critical care). Acute care NPs are trained to manage people in acute settings which include critical care. Anesthesiologist are freqeuntly contracted to manage ICUs because their specialty gives them the expertise needed to manage critical patients. By having both ARNP/CRNA, i will not only be more marketable, but will have a wider scope of practice and prescriptive authority. Additionally, i just wanted the knowledge afforded by both degrees. im kind of nerd like that.
  7. by   Ventjock
    Quote from dqbanrn
    i am currently studying to become an acute care np. i intend to study anesthesia when i complete this. i chose this route becuase this degree wil basically provide me with a masters degree in the prerequisite (critical care). Acute care NPs are trained to manage people in acute settings which include critical care. Anesthesiologist are freqeuntly contracted to manage ICUs because their specialty gives them the expertise needed to manage critical patients. By having both ARNP/CRNA, i will not only be more marketable, but will have a wider scope of practice and prescriptive authority. Additionally, i just wanted the knowledge afforded by both degrees. im kind of nerd like that.
    but people here are saying only bedside critical care would suffice for CRNA schools. what schools would accept your NP cc experience?
  8. by   dqbanrn
    Quote from ramiro_ac
    but people here are saying only bedside critical care would suffice for CRNA schools. what schools would accept your NP cc experience?
    The requirement is that the nurse have a year of acute care clinical experience. That experience should show the nurse understands hemodynamic monitoring, medication drips and other types of invasive monitors. Weather the nurse gains this experience as a bedside nurse or as an np is irrelevant. the school being applied to will decide weather the nurse's experience is adequate, but it must be at least a year. in my case, i already have more than a year of bedside nursing and will also have the masters when i apply, (thats the plan at least)
  9. by   TheBrainMusher
    Just curious if anyone else is exploring this option or have any current input on this matter. This is an area of interest for me.
  10. by   dfk
    Quote from dqbanrn
    The requirement is that the nurse have a year of acute care clinical experience. That experience should show the nurse understands hemodynamic monitoring, medication drips and other types of invasive monitors. Weather the nurse gains this experience as a bedside nurse or as an np is irrelevant. the school being applied to will decide weather the nurse's experience is adequate, but it must be at least a year. in my case, i already have more than a year of bedside nursing and will also have the masters when i apply, (thats the plan at least)
    not saying that NP experience wouldn't apply, but is definitely more limiting.. not many schools "consider" NP as current acute care bed-side experience.. make sure you check with the school before going any further...
  11. by   TX_ICU_RN
    Quote from TheBrainMusher
    Just curious if anyone else is exploring this option or have any current input on this matter. This is an area of interest for me.
    I am also considering this option. I am a Pedi NP (inactive NP license) who is about to start in an adult ICU as a RN. I will start a post-master's certificate in the Fall to earn my ACNP. Snce it will only take me 4-5 courses to get my post-master's ACNP certificate, it is definately worth pursing.

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