Trauma CRNA?

  1. Is there such a thing as a CRNA who works exclusively (or semi-exclusively) with the Trauma Service? Maybe serves to put in lines and intubate folks in the ICU and respond to Alerts in the ER in addition to providing intraop anesthesia?

    Looking for something that will combine Anesthesia with a little more work with Trauma patients.
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  2. 17 Comments

  3. by   CRNA, DNSc
    Quote from trauma_junkie1
    Is there such a thing as a CRNA who works exclusively (or semi-exclusively) with the Trauma Service? Maybe serves to put in lines and intubate folks in the ICU and respond to Alerts in the ER in addition to providing intraop anesthesia?

    Looking for something that will combine Anesthesia with a little more work with Trauma patients.
    Go to work at a level 1 Trauma center- you'll get trauma. You'll intubate in the ICU when others can't. Exclusively?- I am not familiar with anyone doing that but there probably is someone, somewhere!
  4. by   skipaway
    Check out R. Adams Cowley Shock Trauma hospital in Baltimore. That is all they do.
    I did a clinical there when I was at MCV/VCU. Great experience.

    their website:


    http://www.umm.edu/shocktrauma
  5. by   mwbeah
    I know of a few combat support hospitals and forward surgical teams that could use some help overseas right now............
  6. by   BigDave
    Mike,

    The Army ought to pay you extra for recruiter duty!
  7. by   SRNA2010
    I work at Detroit Receiving Hospital in the SICU. The CRNA is paged during codes and intubation requests. They work independant of the MDA during these situations. The only time I have seen an MDA on our unit was during a fiberoptic intubation that was extremely difficult, in which time the CRNA paged the MDA for assistance. The MDA watched as the CRNA performed the intubation. The CRNA's also respond to all trauma codes that enter the ER (very busy) and intubate if the resident physicians have problems. The CRNA will continue care for the patient if they are a surgical candidate, and transport the patient to the ICU.
    From the conversations with the CRNA's, they love the autonomy that DRH offers. The case load is high along with the aquity level.
  8. by   trauma_junkie1
    Quote from skipaway
    Check out R. Adams Cowley Shock Trauma hospital in Baltimore. That is all they do.
    I did a clinical there when I was at MCV/VCU. Great experience.

    their website:


    http://www.umm.edu/shocktrauma
    I wouldn't guess that there is non-stop Trauma resuscitation/operations going on there. What else do they do? The page you sent was pretty short on info about CRNAs... Do they just sit around waiting for traumas or do they participate in care of post-op patients as well?
  9. by   athomas91
    university of MD has both an ER and then there is shock trauma - and yes - shock trauma is all trauma.
  10. by   skipaway
    Quote from trauma_junkie1
    I wouldn't guess that there is non-stop Trauma resuscitation/operations going on there. What else do they do? The page you sent was pretty short on info about CRNAs... Do they just sit around waiting for traumas or do they participate in care of post-op patients as well?
    They have a regular daily schedule where they do cases. These cases are on their trauma admits from days past. For example, lots of major orthopedic procedures are done post trauma incident as well as, dressing changes, trachs, neuro procedures. CRNAs are involved with those cases as well as being the Trauma ER CRNA who waits around for traumas to occur. They usually then accompany the admit to the OR if needed.
  11. by   CRNAgirl
    Quote from trauma_junkie1
    Is there such a thing as a CRNA who works exclusively (or semi-exclusively) with the Trauma Service? Maybe serves to put in lines and intubate folks in the ICU and respond to Alerts in the ER in addition to providing intraop anesthesia?

    Looking for something that will combine Anesthesia with a little more work with Trauma patients.

    Hi,

    I live in Houston and the county hospital is a level 1 Trauma center. Baylor College of Medicine has an CRNA program and CRNA's and SRNA's, residents, and MDA's staff the General OR. The exclusive elevators connect Anesthesia, OB Anesthesia and the ER. So, several times a shift, we would grab the code box and run to the Trauma room or floor for a code. It was a lot of fun. For a serious trauma case, there are usually 5 anesthesia people: one gives the drugs, one types the computer record, one runs the rapid infuser, others put in the lines, etc. There are openings occasionally. I'm sure that there are other trauma hospitals that employ CRNA's, but I only personally know this one.

    MB CRNA
  12. by   CRNAgirl
    Hi,

    I am new to this site. I graduated from anesthesia school in 1998 and have a few years under my belt. If you have any questions to ask a crna, just email me.
  13. by   SKYSTHELIMIT
    WHERE DO U LIVE? AND HOW DO U LIKE THE PROFESSION SO FAR?
    QUOTE=mbujnoch]Hi,

    I am new to this site. I graduated from anesthesia school in 1998 and have a few years under my belt. If you have any questions to ask a crna, just email me.[/QUOTE]
  14. by   CRNAgirl
    Hi,

    I live in Houston, TX. What I like the most about anesthesia is that I feel comfortable saving lives and the knowledge that I've learned. When I was dreaming of anesthesia school years ago, I would try to read some of the AANA journals and it was total greek to me. Obviously now...it's very easy to understand...so the learning curve is huge. The money is great. I work about 20-28 hrs/wk and make what my full-time friends make.

    The downside...it is very stressful. There is a worry of getting sued especially over difficult airways. Patients are getting heavier and heavier and getting harder to pre-oxygenate and intubate. So far...I haven't had any disasters.

    There is a lot of tension between MD anesthesiologists and CRNA's. They resent how much money we make and that we don't take call usually. Other MDs (different specialities) resent how much money we make. MDAs also want to control CRNAs and we are under the nursing board. IF they could control us, then they could cut our pay drastically. A lot of MDAs are pushing for AA's..that is someone with a B.S. degree in any field that they personally train. However, the AAs have no critical bedside nursing experience. Over the past 2 years, it seems that the MDAs are trying not to be so hostile and work with the AANA...but it remains to be seen. Every group is different. Currently, I work with a nice friendly group that like CRNAs, so that is nice. There are a lot of MDAs that are not very proficient at difficult airways and take a lot of chances...that really puts me in a bad situation. At a conference this weekend, they said that if you get involved in a situation that you predict with be bad...that we are just as liable as the MDAs. THat is very tough...because if you question their judgement and they don't really like CRNAs anyway...it's not good for employment.

    So overall, it's a great job for the hours and they pay...just know that it is very stressful...especially the first 5 yrs out of school. There is no perfect job. I am building another business on the side to replace and surpass my current income. But, I will probably always work a little to keep my skills up and I enjoy the mental challenge. Hope this helps.

    MB

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