Tomorrow "The Big Day" - page 2

I cannot help but feel obligated to make a personal satement. Here I Stand at the threshold of the begging of the end in this long road which is academia. Like Timothy I have fought a good fight, I... Read More

  1. by   ticu
    gotosleep,

    I was simply commenting on ability of anesthesiologist to contribute to recovery of the patient after completion of OR procedure but while the patient is still in hands of the anesthesiologist. This opportunity is, in my opinion, often wasted, although there are of course anesthesiologists who care about recovery process and continuity between OR and ICU and are able to deliver patients in better, stable condition because of that.

    I was not making statements about performance of anesthesiologist doing his/her "thing" during surgery or making general comments about profession, etc. Seems to me that anesthetist who would be also an expert in ICU recovery process (hardly somebody with 1-3 year experience), would be better serving their patients, that's all...
  2. by   versatile_kat
    On a calmer note ... congratualtions on school Matt. I'm envious!!! Hopefully I'll be joining you soon as another SRNA.
    Last edit by versatile_kat on Aug 17, '03
  3. by   sweetdreams
    Matt,

    Good Luck to you. I start school on Wednesday. I too feel like I'm at the threshold of a long awaited dream. Am anxious to start but apprehensive at the same time. Sort-of like being at the top of an expert ski slope, adrenalin flowing, hoping you have the skill and talent to survive the run.

    I also echo your sentiments. "for a constant motivation I have decided that if there is ever a day I am sick of studying. I will go straight to the local ICU and remind myself of the alternative."

    Although I always enjoyed the crappy gifts during nurses week, that and the cheap pseudo-hangover I got while driving home after four or five consecutive night shifts.

    Dave
    Last edit by sweetdreams on Aug 17, '03
  4. by   sandman
    Sweetdreams

    You will be in class with 4 of my former co-workers from Via Christi. Make sure and give them all a hard time for me!
  5. by   sweetdreams
    Sandman,

    I'll do my best......lets see...... OK. (1) note to self: bring remote control fart machine to class.
  6. by   sweetdreams
    Sorry about the immaturity of my previous post... just another prime example of
    " why just a year of ICU experience is NOT enough for many people who apply for CRNA school..."
  7. by   sandman
    if you have the same chem instructor as last year, he'll be encouraging that kind of behavior!!! He's one wacky dude (I mean that in a good way)
  8. by   meandragonbrett
    Matt,
    Good luck man! Stick with it and keep us posted on how you are doing and how school is going!! Congradulations!!!!


    Brett
  9. by   Athlein
    Alansmith52,
    Your posts were funny - and true! Those who are most critical of RNs leaving the bedside are often the same ones who feel trapped in that same job description.
    I have been a nurse for a decade, and the changes I have experienced in that relatively short period of time are staggering. Pay is higher, but morale is much lower. Patients are sicker, but staffing is shorter. There is so much emphasis on following policy and procedure that critical thinking has been thrown out the window.
    Here's a great example: a seasoned nurse insisted on changing an artline tubing down to the hub of the catheter("It has been three days, you know! That is our policy") on a multiply-infected IVDU with a devastating head injury. Sure enough, as soon as she got started, the patient lurched out of bed, spraying blood everywhere, screaming his head off. Now what do you think that ICP was during this fiasco? Other families in the unit are totally freaked out (that unrestricted visitation, you know), the patient and nurse are a bloody mess, and the neurosurgeon has to be called (so much for lightening his sedation to check neuro status). But hey, that artline tubing sure looked new.
    I am eager to start in a specialty of nursing that demands critical thinking skills and innovative approaches to patient issues. And yes, it is most assuredly nursing practice.
    I take great care of my patients, and I readily acknowledge that there are some real rewards to critical care nursing. But there are not enough LornaDoones in the kitchens of the entire US healthcare system to keep me at the bedside in an ICU any longer!
    School starts in a few days...woo-hoo!
  10. by   dontae
    Congrats to all of you. I totally understand using the ICU as a motivation and reminder of why you're doing what you're doing. Let's face it, people do things for their own personal reasons and it is nobody's place to judge them for it. On a lighter note, what's a lorna doone? Again, congrats. I'm so envious. I'll be there soon though.

    Dontae
  11. by   athomas91
    ripping our own -- our professionalism apart - for what - to argue who is more suited to care for a critical patient
    all the "experience" in the world can never top "experience + further education"
    NA is the pinnacle of nursing - congrats to you on your graduation
    and shame to those who want to argue about not liking ICU
    i worked CVICU and ER - personally CVICU bores me for the most part....... but you see - i have the right to that opinion.....
    and as far as recovering patients ---- anesthesia just like all others has its "less than perfect" workers - i have worked w/ ICU nurses who didn't know atropine from lido......
  12. by   London88
    athomas91,
    Very well said!

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